Indiana Flag

Washington County Indiana Miller

Indiana Means:

Indiana's State Motto: The Crossroads of America - adopted in 1937

"Land of the Indians"  

Washington County History From the US Data Repository.

Site Map

  

You Are Visitor Number

 

 

Join the Millers of Washington County Mailing List
Enter your name and email address below:

Name:
Email:
Subscribe  Unsubscribe 

 

 

 

Index

Preface | Ch1 | Ch2 | Ch3 | Ch4 | Ch5 | Ch6 | Ch7 | Ch8 | Ch9 |Biographies


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF DAVIESS COUNTY

WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP.


THE AIKMAN FAMILY. The history of Daviess County, Ind., would be incomplete without a detailed sketch of the above-named family; not because they have been holders or aspirants of office, or have urged themselves upon the notice of the citizens of their county, but because from their earliest settlement in this county, in the person of John Aikman, they have been promoters of the advancement and well-being of the community in which they have resided, largely by their liberality, industry, and public enterprise, which, as a whole, are the predominant characteristics of the family. They have represented the county from its very earliest settlement, and have been identified with her in all the progress she has made, and as early pioneers and citizens of a late date, have endured their full share of hardships, and assisted in leveling the sturdy oak, and clearing and developing farms. James Aikman and his descendants constitute one branch of the family. James is the eldest of twelve children—five brothers and two sisters now living—born to the marriage of John Aikman and Mary Barr. He was born in Bourbon County, Ky., January 7, 1810. Both parents were natives of the " Bluegrass State," and when James was but a small boy, came to Daviess County, Ind., and located on a tract of land, which the father entered, two miles south of Washington. Five years later the family removed to the " sugar land " neighborhood in this township, where they resided until a few years previous to the father's death (which occurred in 1850), when they moved to Washington. John Aikman was a quiet, unassuming man, and accumulated considerable means by his frugal and industrious habits. James secured a limited education, attending in the old log schoolhouse of early times. When twenty-two years old he married Sarah Banta, a native of Nicholas County, Ky., born January 1, 1814, and began farming for himself. For fifty years he was a tiller of the soil, and succeeded in accumulating 400 acres of land, one-half of which is under cultivation, and managed by his sons, who reside Upon it. In 1874 he and his wife removed to Washington, and have since lived a retired and happy life, surrounded by the comforts their industry has secured. They became the parents of eight children, these five now living: Samuel, Henry, John, Sarah D., and Martha Anne. Mr. Aikman has been a Republican since the organization of the party, and previous to that time was a Whig. He and his wife have been members of the Presbyterian Church for over forty years. He has resided in Daviess County longer than any other living person, so far as is now known. Samuel T Aikman was born November 2, 1839. He secured a common school education, and married at the age of thirty-nine, locating on part of his father's farm. He was married to Martha Cunningham in 1878. They have two children: Claud and Maud. Henry Aikman was born January 30, 1842, and secured the same education and rearing as his brother. February 19, 1867, he was united in marriage to Laura E. Bradford, who lived to be the mother of three children, only Clara B. living, and died July 30, 1870. In September, 1873, he was married to Sarah L. Williams, who bore him six children, these five living: Willie M., Mamie, Gertie, Henry C., and Paul. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. John Aikman was born February 27, 1845, and was reared upon the same farm that Samuel and Henry were. He was married, in 1870, to Permelia Allen, who bore him six children: James, John A., Edward T., Grace, Charles, and Sicily. He served in the late war, enlisting in the Forty-second Indiana Volunteers in 1862, and remained in the service two years. The sons are all industrious and prominent farmers, and belong to the Republican party. Sarah L., the elder of the two daughters, was born August 24, 1847, and is now the wife of Simeon Coleman, a young farmer living at Topeka, gas. They were married in 1873, and have two children: James W. and Jessie A. Martha Anne, the younger daughter, was born July 25, 1849, and yet resides with her parents.


THOMAS J. AXTELL was born in Washington, Penn., February 3,1835, and is a son of Thomas and Mary (Weir) Axtel, both natives of Pennsylvania. The father removed with his family to Knox County, Ind., in 1836, where he engaged in the mercantile business in the town of Bladensburgh, and here our subject was reared. After securing the ordinary English education he began clerking in his father's dry goods store. When sixteen years of age he left home and clerked in Mount Vernon, Ohio, for four years. After taking a trip to Texas he returned to New Albany, Ind., and in the winter of 1859 came to this city and engaged in the dry goods business for himself, continuing until the war broke out, when he sold out his business, and was traveling salesman for A. L. Scoville & Co., of Cincinnati, Ohio, for four years. He then returned to this city, and he and F. M. Myers formed a partnership in the dry goods business. In 1879 he purchased Mr. Myers' interest, and has since successfully conducted the business alone. He keeps an excellent stock of goods, and is doing quite well financially. October 16, 1862, he married Edna A. Rodarmel, daughter of Samuel Rodarmel, who was a prominent man of the county. To them were born three children, all of whom are living: Edwin R., Frank F., and Ella E. Mr. Axtel is a warm Republican, and takes an active part in political affairs. He has been a member of the city council, and is now a member of the city school board. He is a Mason, Knight Templar degree, and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.


JOHN A. BAIR, sheriff of Daviess County, was born, in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, June 11, 1841, and was one of eight children born to John F. and Louisa (Keplinger) Bair, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Maryland. The subject of this sketch was brought up by his parents in his native county, and there secured an ordinary English education. He was trained to a farmer's life, and accordingly, in 1862, located on a farm in Wabash County, Ind. In 1865 he returned to his native county, and in the spring of 1866 removed with his parents to Daviess County, and farmed one season in Van Buren Township.In 1867 he married Sidney Zeigler, a native of Tuscarawas County, Ohio, whose parents removed to this county some years previously. After his marriage he resided two years in Van Buren Township, farming in summer and teaching school in winter. He then removed to Madison Township, where he lived four years, when he engaged in saw-milling, and continued in this business with good success until 1884. He was elected by the Democratic party sheriff of Daviess County, which office he is now filling. Mr. Bair has always been an unswerving Democrat. In 1862 he enlisted as a recruit for the Eighty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, but was prevented from entering into active service by the capture of the regiment at Mumfordsville, Ky. He was honorably discharged on account of physicial disability, caused by a wound in the right ankle. Mr. Bair is the father of four children, three of whom are living: Daniel W., Curtis H. and Ada P. Mr. and Mrs. Bair are both members of the United Brethren Church, and he is justly recognized as one of the enterprising and successful citizens of Daviess County.

E. A. BALDWIN, farmer, of Daviess County, Ind., was born in Vermillion County, Ill., April 28, 1850, and is one of fourteen children, all yet living, born to Jesse W. and Eleanor (Harris) Baldwin, who were born in Ohio. A number of years after marriage they moved to Vermillion County, Ill., thence to Chicago, where the father followed real estate agency, and was financially successful. He is yet residing in that city. The father is about eighty-five years of age and the mother ten years younger. Our subject was reared on a farm until nine years old, when he went with his parents to Chicago, where he secured a fair business education. He resided there until about nineteen years old, when he returned to Vermillion County, and about 1873 came to Washington, Ind., and was in the drug business for about nine years. He then went to Montgomery Station and kept a drug store for three years, and then came to his present place of residence. May 1, 1881, he was united in marriage to Mary C. Prosner, a native of Licking County, Ohio, born October 14, 1854, daughter of Thomas and Mary (Price) Prosper, who were natives of South Wales. To them were born two children, one of whom died at fourteen months old, Willie, and one now three months old, Otto C. The wife owns 165 acres of very fine land, and is a member of the Baptist Church. Mr. Baldwin is a warm Republican in politics, and is an enterprising young farmer.

JAMES M. BARR, attorney at law, Washington, Ind., was born in Reeve Township, Daviess County, October 27, 1841, and is one of a family of three sons and four daughters born to John and Julie (Burriss) Barr, both natives of Kentucky. The father came to this county with his father, James Barr, when he was a lad of eight years, in about 1816, and located in what is now Barr Township, where the father and grandfather of the subject of this sketch spent the greater part of their lives. James M. Barr was raised on the farm with his parents, securing a fair education in the common branches. In 1862 he enlisted in Company D., Eightieth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served in the civil war three years as private and non-commissioned officer. At the close of the war he returned home and followed the life of a farmer until 1880, in Reeve Township, in the meantime studying law. In the year last named he moved to Washington, and being admitted to the Daviess County bar in 1881, has since been engaged in the practice of the law, meeting with very encouraging success. Mr. Barr is a stanch Republican, and served in Reeve Township as justice of the peace four years. He is a member of the G. A. K He was married in December, 1866, to Martha Allen, a native of Daviess County. They have four children: Ora May, Minnie, Allen and Eva. Both Mr. and Mrs. Barr are members of the Presbyterian Church. John Barr, the father of the subject of this sketch, became a resident of Reeve Township, where he bought a tract of land, which he cleared and improved, undergoing all kinds of hardships in the meantime. He led a long, useful and honorable life, dying in February, 1885. Mrs. Barr died when James M. was a mere child, and John Barr subsequently married Lucy Gillick, who died about six years since, leaving one child—a son.

GAYLORD G. BARTON, attorney at law of Washington, Ind., and native of the county, was born April 11, 1844, son of Gaylord G. and Ann (Murphy) Barton, natives respectively of New York and Ireland. The father came to this city in May,18-34, where he married and began practicing medicine. His death occurred February 12, 1884. He was an active politician in his day, and was at one time State senator for this district. He was a Democrat in politics, and took an active interest in all public and private enterprises to promote the welfare of the county. He was trustee of the Wabash & Erie Canal a number of years, and was prominently identified with the county medical societies, and was a member of the city school board a number of years. He died in the Catholic faith, after having spent a life of usefulness in the county. The mother died when our subject was a small lad, and the father afterward married Ellen M. Murphy, a sister of his first wife, who still survives him. Our subject was raised in this city, and secured a good literary education. At the age of nineteen he ,began teaching school, and continued this occupation irregularly until 1867, when he accepted a position as deputy in the clerk's office of this county, serving until the fall of 1875, when he entered the law department of the State University at Bloomington, Ind., from which he graduated in 1877. After a trip to Europe be returned to this city the same year and entered upon his professional career, in which he has met with good success. He is a Democrat and was reared in the Catholic faith. He is a reliable practitioner and an upright citizen of the county.

STEPHEN BELDING, editor and proprietor of the Daviess County Democrat, was born in Washington, Ind., November 21. 1841, the youngest of ten children born to Stephen and Elizabeth (Clenny) Belding. His father was a shoe-maker by trade, and later in life was a boot and shoe merchant. His grandfather (Clenny) was a Revolutionary war soldier. At twelve years of age Stephen began the printer's trade in his native town, and after serving his apprenticeship continued the trade until 1859, when he entered the Indiana State University, where he continued two years. In 1861 he purchased the Martin County Herald, which he published at Dover Hill until 1863; then was employed in the Evansville Journal for a time. Until the fall of 1867 he was employed on the Cincinnati Commercial, but after that returned to Washington, Ind., and in connection with J. H. Palmer, organized the joint stock company that established the Daviess County Democrat. Mr. Belding has ever since been connected with this enterprise, and through his individuality has won a place of distinction in southern Indiana journalism. Six months after the paper's establishment, Mr. Belding bought the entire stock, and has since been sole proprietor. He is a Democrat, and one of Washington's foremost citizens. January 22, 1872, was the celebration of his nuptials with Miss Cora White, of this city.

JOHN C. BILLHEIMER, attorney at law, was born in Wayne County, Ind., March 3, 1857, being one of five children born to Solomon and Margaret (Gephat) Billheimer, both of German descent. The father was a native of Virginia, and the mother of Pennsylvania. The immediate subject of this sketch was raised in the county of his birth, and secured a good education, attending the Northern Indiana Normal School and Business College at Valparaiso, Ind., one and a half years. In his native county he had taught one term of school before attending the Normal College, and afterward he followed that profession for a time. When in his eighteenth year he began the study of law, and at the age of nineteen entered the law office of Brown & Brown, Newcastle, Ind., completing his studies in 1879. In October of that year he located at Washington, Ind., in the practice of his profession, in which he has continued ever since, meeting with good success. His wife, Susan Kimball, was also a native of Wayne County, Ind. Their marriage was solemnized in 1879, and has been blessed with three children: John Leroy, Irving and Charles. Politically he is a Republican. Although he has never aspired to any office of note he has taken some interest in political affairs of the county. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., K. of H., and A. 0. of R. M. Both himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. At present he is chairman of the Daviess County Republican Central Committee.

R. & E. BEITMAN constitute one of the oldest and most prominent business firms of southwestern Indiana, and the leading clothiers of Washington. Raphael Beitman, the senior member of the firm, was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 22, 1833, son of Isaac and Fredo (Goodman) Beitman, born in 1796 and 1801, and died in 1861 and 1862, respectively. The family are Germans by birth, and can be traced back at least five generations. Our subject's boyhood was spent in his native country, and there he received his early education. In 1854 he came to America,and landed at New York, and then came to Indiana and settled at Petersburg, Pike County, and there remained one year. He then went to Vincennes, and for two years clerked in a store, and then came to Washington and engaged in the clothing business. In 1859 Emanuel Beitman, a younger brother of our subject, came to Washington from Germany, having been born in that country June 3, 1838. On coming to Washington he engaged in business with his brother, and until 1861 they sold goods throughout the country, traveling all the time. They then purchased the stock of goods of James Neal, who was a soldier in the Rebellion, and engaged in the family grocery business, being the only house of the kind in Washington. They continued until 1863, when they purchased the stock of clothing of G. Beitman, and have since very successfully continued in that business. They do an extensive business, and have the almost unlimited confidence of the people. The senior member of the firm was married, in December, 1865, to Miss Amelia Joseph, a native of Germany. They have four children, as follows: Flora, Jacob, Julia and Bertha.. The junior member of the firm was married in the city of "Brotherly Love," March 17, 1869, to Miss Amelia Sternberger, born in Bavaria, Germany. They have five children: Lillie, Jennie, Bertha, Blanche A. and Stella. The firm are Democratic in their political views. Raphael is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and Emanuel of the Masons.

JESSE BILLINGS was born in Lawrence County, Ind., August 19, 1831, of English and Welsh descent, and son of William and Mary (Davis) Billings, natives of Tennessee and Wales, respectively. They were married in Tennessee in 1820, and two years later moved to Lawrence County, Ind., where they purchased 200 acres of land near Mitchell. When Jesse was about eight years old his mother died, and he remained with his father, assisting him on the farm until nineteen years of age. February 7, 1850, he was married to Sarah Miller, born November 22, 1833, daughter of John and Susannah (Tyre) Miller, and moved to Illinois, where he purchased land and lived for about four years. He then came to Daviess County, Ind., and bought 135 acres of land, which he has since increased to 560 acres, 460 acres being under cultivation.. His land is all underlaid with a good quality of coal. At a depth of 190 feet they found a six-foot vein, and at fifty feet an eighteen-inch vein, and at ninety feet a four-foot vein, all of which was analyzed and found to be first-class. He and wife are the parents of these children: John W., Abram R., Mary S., George W., Annie A., Airnetta B., Morton E., Charles S., Lillie M., Louis S. and Jesse F. Mr. Billings is a Republican and cast his first vote for Fillmore. He has been a member of the Masonic lodge twenty-seven years, and a member of the Christian Church twenty years. Mr. Billings was not in the late war, but his sympathies were with the Union soldiers. He had three brothers who served, and all were wounded, but returned home in safety.

E. G. BON DURANT, freight and ticket agent of the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad at Washington, Ind., was born near Frankfort, Ky., July 10, 1836, and is the second of a family of three children born to Thomas L. and Elizabeth (Woodfill) Bon Durant. natives. respectively, of Virginia and Kentucky. The father was of French descent, and was supply agent for the Madison & Indianapolis Railroad. He was killed by an accident in 1844. The mother lived until 1882. Our subject was reared to the age of eight years in Kentucky, when he and his parents came to Indiana. He secured a very limited education in the schools of Madison, never attending more than three months. He remained with his mother until 1850, having engaged at telegraphy on the Madison & Indianapolis Railroad, and has ever since been employed in different capacities on that and the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad. He was division superintendent of the east division of the last-named road for about four years, beginning in 1869. He was assistant general superintendent of the Jeffersonville, Madison & Indianapolis Railroad for four years. He then returned to the Ohio & Mississippi as master of transportation of the whole line several years, but resigned the position and came to Washington and engaged in the railroad and coal business, acting as railroad agent. He was married, in July, 1860, to Susan C. McGannon, a native of Jennings County, Ind. To them were born seven children; one died in infancy. Those living are Ella (wife of George Walters, Jr.), Oliver E., Elva, Fannie, William H. and Daisy C. Mrs. Bon Durant is a member of the Baptist Church, and he is a Mason—Knight Templar degree. Politically he is a Republican.

BONHAM & GILL, undertakers, and manufacturers of and dealers in furniture, Washington, Ind., is a firm composed of M. L. Bonham and Joseph H. Gill.• Martin Luther Bonham was born in Dearborn County, Ind., March 4, 1827, and is a son of Zedekiah and Amelia (Cullom) Bonham, natives, respectively, of Virginia and Ohio. The subject of this sketch was brought up on a farm by his parents and received a limited common school education. At the age of seventeen he learned the cabinet-maker's trade in Hamilton County, Ohio. He continued working at his trade and at the furniture business in that county until 1862, when he removed to Washington and entered the employ of John Mattingly, who had established the present business some years previously. Six months later he entered into partnership with his employer, and the firm enjoyed a prosperous business until Mr. Mattingly's death in 1872. Mr. Bonham then conducted the business alone until 1874, when he accepted as a partner Joseph H. Gill. This firm has continued ever since and enjoys a large share of the trade in this line. They are the leading undertakers in the city, and carry a full stock of furniture. Mr.Bonham is a Republican and a Royal Arch Mason. He was married, in 1847, to Selana Lincoln, who died, leaving four children: George H., Mary (the wife of John Cretz, of Harrison, Ohio), Zedekiah A. and Clifford L. In 1864 he was married to his present wife, Mrs. Sarah A. Sowers.

WILLIAM H. BOONE, farmer, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, December 2, 1847 ; son of Isaac and Mary (Holderman) Boone, and is of German descent. His father was born in Rockingham County, Va., in 1815, and his mother in Montgomery County, Ohio. In 1825 the Boone family removed from Virginia to Montgomery County, Ohio, and there the grandfather of our subject died. In 1858 the father of subject removed from Montgomery County to Miami County, Ohio, and there still resides. Our subject was raised on the farm and attended the public schools of his neighborhood. He began for himself at eighteen years of age, and came to Daviess County in 1883 and settled where he now lives, on what was known as the Bruner farm. He has 110 acres of well-improved land one mile from Washington. He was married, in 1869, to Miss Frances V. Malcom, a native of Shelby County, Ohio, born in 1849, daughter of Nathan and Deborah Malcom. They have four children, viz - Maggie 31., Mary B., Blanche D. and Hazel E. He is a Republican and a most enterprising gentleman.

SAMUEL B. BOYD, superintendent of the schools of Daviess County, was born at Yorkville, Dearborn Co., Ind., March 14, 1858, being a son of John and Elizabeth (Miller) Boyd (both deceased), who were natives of Ireland and Ohio, respectively. He was reared on a farm in his native county by his parents, receiving a good literary education. He completed his schooling with a course at the Central Normal College at Danville, Ind., and at the age of nineteen began his career as a public teacher. In 1871 he removed with his parents to this county, teaching four years in the county schools, and since acting as principal of the Odon schools and as an instructor in the city schools of Washington. June 1, 1883, he was elected county superintendent, a position he has since filled with satisfaction. He is an Odd Fellow, a Democrat and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HON. MATTHEW L. BRETT, born January 5, 1823, in South Carolina, is the eldest of seven children born to Patrick M. and Mary Brett, who were born in the "Emerald Isle," and came to this country immediately after marriage, about 1820, and lived in South Carolina about ten years and then came to Daviess County, Ind. The father was a lawyer and teacher, and a very prominent man of the county, having held several very important offices. His death occurred in 1844 and the mother's in 1868. Matthew Brett was reared on the farm where he now lives. His early education was very limited, as his help was much needed at home. After his father's death he remained on the home farm and has assisted his mother ever since. At the age of twenty-one he succeeded his father in the auditor's office in 1844, and held the position fifteen years successively. He also carried on farming, milling and merchandising to some extent. In 1860 he was elected to the State Legislature, and served the regular and special sessions. He served two years on a committee appointed by the Legislature to audit the expenses incurred by the State on account of the war. In 1862 he was elected treasurer of State and held the position two years. In 1872 he was elected from Daviess County to the Legislature and served two sessions. Shortly afterward he unfortunately became a cripple, and has ever since given his time and attention to his farm and has been very prosperous. He owns 250 acres of land, part near Washington and part in Warren County. He was married, June 1, 1858, to Miss Alice Hayes, of Vincennes. To them were born two children, both of whom are now deceased: Anna (who lived to be the wife of Austin F. Cabel, and the mother of one child, named Brett Cabel, the only descendant of our subject) and William (who died when young). The family are members of the Catholic Church, and our subject has always been a Democrat, politically. The different positions of honor and trust he has filled so efficiently and satisfactorily indicate the high regard in which he is held by all.

ROBERT A. BROWN was born on the farm where he now lives September 10, 1850. He was the fifth of eight children born to Benjamin F. and Jane (Wallace) Brown. The father was born on the same farm. He was a farmer all his life, and was quite prosperous. The mother was probably a native of Tennessee. Our subject was reared on a farm and secured a common school education. He made his home with his parents until twenty-one years of age. In 1871 he, with his four other brothers, began making brick, and in 1875 added a tile factory to their brickyard and now do perhaps the most extensive and paying business of the kind in the county. Our subject also farmed quite extensively, and the brothers now own 150 acres of very fine land. December 25, 1879, he was united in marriage to Emma Lynch, a native of the county, born and reared on an adjoining farm. One child, named Pearl, has blessed their union. Robert is a Republican politically, and is one of the prominent business men of the county. John F. Brown, brother of Robert A. Brown, was born February 8, 1846. He received much the same rearing as his brother and remained with his parents until their respective deaths. When our subject was but fourteen years old his father died, and the mother lived until 1873. He is a joint owner of the farm of 150 acres, and also has an interest in the tile and brick manufactory with his four brothers. They have devised a patent on the Eureka Tile Kiln which is proving very favorable and promises a success financially. They have the most extensive factory in the county and are doing a big business. March 21, 1873, he was married to Belle F. Dudley, a native of eastern Ohio. They have three children: William T., Benjamin F. and Libbie M. Mr. Brown is a stanch Republican in politics.

JESSE W. BURTON, attorney at law, Washington, Ind., was born in Garrard County, Ky., October 2, 1828, and is a son of Robert A. and Sarah (Williams) Burton, both natives of Kentucky, living and dying in their native State. Jesse W. Burton was brought up on a farm by his parents in Kentucky until he was fourteen years old, when he entered Bradley Institute in Garrard County, remaining there several years, after which he entered Cumberland Academy at Monticello, Ky., of which his brother, William M. Burton, was the principal. By this time he was eighteen years of age and had obtained a good literary education_ He then taught country school some years. At the age of twenty he began reading law at the capital of his native county, and received a license to practice August 14, 1850. He read law with his brother, Allan A. Burton, afterward appointed by President Lincoln Minister to the United States of Colombia, South America. He then spent a year traveling and prospecting for a location in northwestern Missouri. He then came to .Washington, but soon located at Petersburg, Pike County, where he practiced law less than a year, returning then to and locating in Washington, opening his office May 16, 1853. With the exception of the years 1875 and 1876, when he resided in Lawrenceburg, Ind., he has continually resided in Washington since that time, and has earned for himself a high place in the legal fraternity of Daviess County. Judge Burton, before the war of the Rebellion, was an old time Whig, casting his first presidential vote for Gen. Winfield Scott. At the formation of the Republican party he became a Republican, and at the breaking out of the war was one of the first to espouse the cause of the Union, making the first Union speech made in the county. He assisted to raise the first company sent from Daviess County, under Capt. Charles Childs, and during the entire continuance of that terrible conflict was active in giving financial and moral support to the Union. During 1856 and 1857 he was prosecuting attorney for the district composed of Knox, Daviess, Pike and Martin Counties. He was a candidate for judge of common pleas, and also for judge of the circuit court, but defeated in each instance owing to the hopeless minority of the republican party. On the 23d of November, 1869, he was admitted to practice in the United States Courts. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and is P.N.G. of the local lodge; he is also a Master Mason. He was married November 22, 1860, to Sarah M. Jackson, a native of Elizabethtown, Hamilton Co., Ohio, by whom he has five children: Ada J. (wife of Frank A. Collier), Emma S. (wife of Clinton K. Tharp), Mary H., Robert W. and Nellie.

ALEXANDER CHOMEL, editor of the Washington Advertiser, was born in France in 1826, and is a son of Dennis and Lucy (Collason) Chomel. He was reared in a city and had good educational advantages. At the age of twenty-three he came to America and located in New Albany, Ind., where he followed merchandising three years. He went to Loogootee, Ind., in 1860, and engaged in the same business. He edited the Loogootee Times for some time and then moved to Shoals and edited the Martin County Herald. In September, 1884, he came to Washington and has since edited the Advertiser and Enterprise. In December, 1850, he took for his companion through life Sabina Carrico, a native of Kentucky, to whom were born nine children, eight now living: Lucy, Thomas, Catharine, Julius, Alexander, William, Mary and Anselm. As an editor he wields much influence in the political affairs of the county, and with all the zeal and energy of which he is capable furthers the interests of the Democratic party. He is a member of the Catholic Church.


A. D. COLBERT was born in Daviess County, Ind., in March, 1837. He is a son of L. D. and Jane (Birch) Colbert, who were born in 1818 and 1819, respectively. The mother died when our subject was quite young, and he made his home with his father until twenty-one years of age, when he was married to Sarah Walker, daughter of Solomon and Martha Jane Walker, natives of East Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs. Colbert are the parents of the following children: George, Emma, Minnie (deceased), Herbert, Edgar, Benjamin, Mildred, Maggie, John, Seth, Charles and William. After his marriage he lived two years in Veal Township, and August 1, 1863 enlisted in Company I, Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteers and served two years, when he was transferred to the One Hundred and Twentieth Indiana Regiment. He was in the East Tennessee campaign and in several engagements, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea. He was with Thomas at Nashville and Schofield at Franklin. He was at the capture of Wilmington. On the 19th of January, 1866, he was mustered out at Raleigh, N. C. He is a Republican and cast his first vote for Lincoln. He has been a member of the Christian Church thirty years and his wife of the same for forty years.

PHILLIP CRUSE, dec'd, was born Aug. 4, 1795, in North Carolina. His parents, Henry C. and Susan Cruse, were native Germans. They moved to Hamilton, Ohio, at an early period, where the father followed farming. Phillip assisted his father for eight years and then was apprenticed to a man in Cincinnati to learn the tailor's trade. After mastering his trade he tramped to Lexington, Ky., with only one half dollar in his pocket. He soon saved $100, and then walked to Louisville, Ky., where he worked at his trade. He and a friend then went to New Orleans on flat-boats. Our subject worked there four months and then returned to Ohio via boat to Philadelphia; thence to Baltimore, Washington, D. C., Alexandria and Uniontown., Va. ; thence by boat to Pittsburgh; thence to Portsmouth, Ohio, and finally reached Maysville, Ky., where he remained one month and then went to Terre Haute, Ind., and in the spring went to Vincennes. Later be came to Washington, Daviess County, where he worked at his trade for several years, and then kept a general merchandise store about the same length of time. He then began keeping hotel where the present Presbyterian Church stands, and after working at that for several years engaged in the hardware business on a small scale, and soon had an extensive trade. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics was a Federalist, Whig, Abolitionist and Republican. He was married three times; the first time to Sarah Rodick, who bore him these children: Seth H., Minerva, John R., Joseph W. and Elizabeth. Only John is now living. His second wife was Elizabeth Bruce, who became the mother of one child, Martha (deceased). His third marriage was to Sarah Carnahan, born May 21, 1813, in Kentucky, daughter of Jane and Elizabeth (Aikman) Carnahan, born in Virginia and Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Cruse were married March 5, 1837, and became the parents of these children: James P., who was a soldier in the war and died at Washington of typhoid fever, and Charles F. who died in infancy. The sons were all Masons. Mr. Cruse died June 16, 1885, in the ninetieth year of his age. He was respected by all and was a thoroughly self-made man. He owned eighty acres of land, and property to the amount of $6,500. He was a valuable citizen and was noted for his kindness and charity to the poor. Mrs. Cruse is an active and intellectual old lady of seventy years. She presented a flag to the first company of Daviess County soldiers that left for the war, and delivered the memorial oration, which was noted for its eloquence.

NELSON CUNNINGHAM. dec'd, was a native of Clark County, where he was born June 17, 1821. His parents, Thomas and Martha (Mathews) Cunningham, were natives of Virginia and South Carolina, respectively. Our subject attended the common schools, and remained with his parents until twenty-one years old. In 1844 he was married to Mary M. Little, to whom were born three children: Sarah A., Nancy I. and Martha E., all now deceased. His wife died in 1851, and he was married to Elizabeth Johnson, January 18, 1854. She is a daughter of James and Mary (Miller) Johnson, and was born in Pennsylvania and reared in Kentucky. Mr. Cunningham settled near Odon, Daviess County, soon after marriage, where he remained nine years, and then removed to the place where Mrs. Cunningham now lives. These five children were born to them: James, Mary E., Charles A., Maggie A. and Bluford (deceased). After settling in this county they engaged in farming and stock raising. Mr. Cunningham died May 26, 1870, of pneumonia. He was not a member of any secret society, but was a member of the Christian Church a number of years. He owned 140 acres of land. The wife was also a member of the Christian Church.

ELIAS L. DAGLEY, M. D., of Washington, Ind., was born in Scotland, Greene Co., Ind., May 4, 1815, and was one of eight children born to James A. Dagley and Martha A., his wife, formerly Barker, natives respectively of England and .Greene County, Ind. The father came from England with his parents when he was an infant, they locating in Greene County. There he grew up, married and practiced medicine until his death, about twelve years ago. The subject of our sketch remained at home with his parents until sixteen years of age, obtaining such an. education as was then afforded by the common schools. He then left home and engaged in the drug business in Tipton, Mo., where he remained four years. He then returned home and studied medicine with his father eighteen months, when, on account of failing health, he spent the next two years in traveling in the West. In 1868 he returned home and married his present wife, Caturah E. Odell, a native of Greene County, Ind. After marriage he engaged as clerk in the drug business at home and in Missouri. In 1872 he attended a course of lectures at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Indianapolis, and during the four subsequent years practiced his profession in Greene County. He attended Miami Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, graduating thence in 1875, and then came to Daviess County and practiced at Odon until 1883, when he removed to Washington, where he has since resided, engaged in the practice of his profession and meeting with very flattering success. In 1863 he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Seventeenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving as a private during his term of enlistment—six months. In politics he is a Republican, and is an Odd Fellow. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, while Mrs. Dagley is a Baptist. Mr. and Mrs. Dagley have had five children, four of whom are living: Martha C., Susan E., Ella May and Craggy.

JOHN DOWNEY, attorney at law, Washington, Ind., was born in Martin County, Ind., January 10, 1855. He is one of a family of twelve children (eleven of whom are now living) born to Michael and Julia (Doyle) Downey. The father was born in Queens County, Ireland, and the mother being also of Irish descent, though born in New Jersey. Michael Downey came to the United States in 1845, and for some years followed coal mining in Pennsylvania. About the year 1850 he came to Martin County, Ind., and entered a tract of land where he has since resided, engaged in farming. The subject of this sketch was raised on the farm with his parents, securing a good literary education and preparing himself to teach school, which profession he followed from the time he was nineteen years of age until he was twenty-two. His services were rendered in district schools, in the normal school at Dover Hill, and in Loogootee public schools. In the intervals of teaching he was improving his education by attendance upon the public schools of Loogootee, the normal school at Valparaiso, Ind., and the Notre Dame University at South Bend. While teaching he also began reading law, with the view of making that his profession. In 1880 he entered the law office of Gardiner & Taylor, of Washington, and continued reading with them until the close of that year, when he entered the office of Bynum & Padgett, becoming the latter's partner after the former's removal. He has since been engaged in the practice of his profession in Washington, meeting with well-deserved success. On the 1st of July, 1885, he dissolved partnership with Mr. Padgett and entered into partnership with J. C. Billheimer. In politics Mr. Downey is a Democrat, and has been deputy prosecuting attorney at Washington three years. He has been attorney for the city of Washington for the past two years, and is attorney for the Industrial Savings and Loan Association, of Washington. He was married, May, 1, 1882, to Miss Bose A. Hughes, a native of Daviess County, by whom he has one child, George A. Downey.

JOHN W. DOYLE, reverend father of St. Simon's Church, Washington, Ind., was born in Madison, Ind., August 1, 1851, and is a son of John and Ellen Doyle, both natives of Ireland. Father Doyle was raised with his parents in his native place, and obtained a fair education at the local parish school. At the age of sixteen he entered St. Meinrad's College, in Spencer County, Ind., where he began his studies for the priesthood. Two years-later he attended St. Thomas' and St. Joseph's Colleges, at Bards town, Ky. He began his theological studies at the Grand Seminary of Montreal, Canada, and completed them at Indianapolis, Ind., where he was ordained priest by Bishop St. Palais, May 25, 1875. He then took charge of St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum, near Vincennes, Ind., remaining there, however, only a short time, when he took charge of St. Mary's Church, in Barr Township, Daviess County. In 1879 he was transferred to Washington as priest in charge of St. Simon's Church of that city, where he still remains the efficient and popular priest.

JEREMIAH EGAN. The Egan family are the descendants of Irish ancestors, and the older ones of the family now living were natives of Ireland. In the fall of 1837 Patrick Egan and his family came to the United States. They landed in New Orleans, but came on to Indiana and settled in Daviess County. The entire family did not come at first, but after selecting a location they sent back for the rest of the family, who came in 1838. Patrick was born in 1792. In Ireland he was a merchant, but after coming to America he became a tiller of the soil. The mother's, Bridget (Louregan) Egan, death occurred in February, 1873. They were the parents of twelve children, three of whom are now living: Catherine, Martin and Jeremiah. Martin was born probably in 1820, although no record of his birth has been preserved. He was about eighteen when he came to the United States, and was reared on a farm, securing a limited education. He has been afflicted ever since a small boy with "white swelling." He has never married, but makes his home with his brother Jeremiah, who was born in the " Emerald Isle " June 5, 1827, being the seventh of the family. Like his brother he secured a limited education, and his father died when he was young. He remained with his mother until his marriage, when she made her home principally with him, and died at his residence. At the age of thirty-one he married and settled where he now lives. He has developed his farm of 280 acres from a wilderness to one of the best farms in the county. September 13, 1858, he married Jane E. Juigley, a native of the county, born February 21, 1838. They became the parents of nine children, six now living: Bridget, Patrick, Joseph, Martin, Catherine and Anna. The family are Catholics, and our subject has always been a Democrat politically, and is one of the prosperous farmers of the county.

E. R. ESKRIDGE, harness and saddle-maker of Washington, Ind., was born in Kentucky January 17, 1829. He was the third of ten children born to Joseph W. and Fannie (Robinson) Eskridge, who were natives of Virginia, but were raised in Kentucky. Our subject worked on the farm and at the tanner's trade until he was eighteen years old. His father died about this time and he remained with his mother until twenty-three years of age, and aided and supported the family during that time. He then learned the saddler's trade, but was not devoted to any particular business for about three years. In 1855 he came to Washington, Ind., where he worked at his trade or any labor that presented itself. December 7, 1856, the nuptials of his marriage to Sarah M. Smyth were celebrated, and some time later he opened a shop of his own at Edwardsport, but remained there but a short time. In December, 1858, he began working at his trade in Washington, where he continued until January, 1865, when he sold his stock and residence and went to Burlington, Iowa, and thence to Oregon. He was absent about sixteen months looking for a location, but at last returned to Washington, Ind., where he continued the harness and saddlery trade. He keeps a fine stock of goods and has been very successful in his business enterprises. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and politically has been a Democrat since the extinction of the Whig party. He cast his first presidential vote for Winfield Scott. He is one of the prominent men of the county and is highly respected as an honorable and upright citizen. To his marriage five children were born, three of whom are living: Fannie M. (wife of J. T. Neale), Samuel C. and Lulu.

S. CICERO ESKRIDGE, of the firm of Neal & Eskridge, of Washington, Ind., was born in this city January 29, 1861, and is a son of Elijah R. and Sarah Matilda (Smyth) Eskridge. He was raised with his parents and graduated from the high school at this city. At the age of seventeen he began clerking in the grocery business in this city, continuing until 1882, when he engaged in the business for himself, and carried a fine line of dry goods, with John T. Neal as partner. He has continued in the business to the present time and has met with good success. October 12, 1882, he married Ida M. Mills, a native of Sandusky, Ohio, daughter of John R. Mills (deceased), who was a prominent stock dealer of this city. They have one child, named Harry M. Mr. Eskridge is a Democrat in his political views, and is recognized as one of the rising and successful business men of the city. He is a member of the K. of P.


JUDGE WILLIAM R. GARDINER, a prominent attorney of Daviess County, was born January 18, 1837, in central New York, being the youngest of a family of thirteen children born to David N. and Susanna C. (Andrews) Gardiner, both of whom were natives of Rhode Island. He was reared to the age of seventeen on a farm in his native State and then went to Ross County, Ohio, and studied medicine two years, attending medical lectures at Cincinnati and Cleveland, Ohio. He had not completed his medical course when he came to Indiana, where he worked in the employ of the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad Company as carpenter, telegraph operator and ticket agent at different times, and also taught school in the meantime. In the fall of 1862 he entered the law office of J. W. Burton, in Washington, and read law one year, having read two years before under direction of M. F. Burke. In fall of 1863 he opened a law office at Dover Hill, Martin Co., Ind., and practiced there one year, at end of which time he located in the practice of his profession in connection with William Thompson, at Washington, for a few months. In 1865 he was married to Laura A. Gibson, of Martin County, daughter of Thomas M. Gibson, a very prominent merchant of Loogootee, and for three years was at Loogootee ill his profession. He then formed a law partnership with Col. C. M. Allen and Hon. Nathaniel P. Usher, in Vincennes, where he remained till June, 1872, when he located at Washington, where he has ever since practiced law; with S. H. Taylor, one year; with Judge J. T. Pierce, two years; with William Armstrong, two years, and then with his former partner, S. H. Taylor, with whom he has been connected ever since. Mr. Gardiner's married life has been blessed with six. children, but three of whom are now living: Charles G., William R. and Susanna A. (the two sons are now in the State University at Bloomington). He has, since the summer of 1864, been a very zealous Republican in politics, unless his vote for Mr. Greeley in 1872 is an exception. He has represented Daviess County for several years in Republican State conventions. In 1884 he was a delegate from this congressional district to the National Republican Convention at Chicago, and is distinguished as being the only Indianian who addressed the convention. He was attorney for the town of Washington in 1864 and 1865. Was appointed prosecuting attorney for the district then including Knox, Gibson, Pike, Dubois, Martin and Daviess Counties, by Gov. 0. P. Morton in 1866, to fill vacancy caused by the resignation of R. A. Clements, who was then elected judge of common pleas district court. On the death of R. A. Clements Mr. Gardiner was appointed. by Gov. Baker to fill his unexpired term of judge. He made a race for judge of Knox and Daviess Circuit Court in 1882, carrying Daviess County, whose regular majority was about 200 Democratic by 270 majority, Newton F. Malott, a Democrat, being his opponent in the candidacy. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity. He is a sell-made man and has met with well deserved success.

R. E. GEETING & BRO., watch-makers and jewelers, Washington, Ind. This firm consists of Royal E. and George C. W. Geeting. They bought their present business of J. C. Farron in 1880, starting at that time with small stock and limited capital, but by strict attention to business, economy and integrity, they have succeeded in building up a flourishing business. They carry a full line of watches, clocks, jewelry and silverware, and control a large share of the trade in this line in Daviess County. Royal E. Geeting was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, September, 1856, and is a son of Isaac and Caroline (Watson) Geeting, natives, respectively, of Maryland and Hamilton County, Ohio. Isaac Geeting removed to this city with his family in 1868, and he has since resided here, engaged in contracting and building, being a carpenter by trade. The subject of this sketch worked with his father at the carpenter's trade until he was twenty-one years old, when he entered the jewelry store of N. H. Jepson, of Washing
' ton, where he learned the watch-maker's and jeweler's trade, and continued with Mr. Jepson over three years. He then worked at his trade four months in Sullivan, Ind., when he returned to Washington and established his present business. Mr. Geeting is a Republican in politics, and is justly recognized as one of the enterprising and successful business men of Daviess County, and as a moral, upright man. In November, 1881, he was married to Maggie Wright, a native of this county, by whom he has one son, named Otis K. Geeting.

GEORGE C. W. GEETING was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, May 26, 1853, and is a son of Isaac and Caroline Geeting. He was reared on a farm in his native county by his parents, and secured the usual common school education of the time. He came to Washington with his parents, and was for ten years engaged as clerk in the grocery and dry goods business. In 1880 he took an interest in his present jewelry business with his brother, and since 1882 has been actively engaged in connection therewith. He is a member of the K of P., and is a Republican in politics.

JOSEPH H. GILL, of the firm of Bonham & Gill, was born in Bond County, Ill., July 30, 1840, being a son of Joseph and Elizabeth Gill, who died in Illinois when our subject was ten years old. Immediately after their death he left the home farm, and at that tender age began life's battle for himself. He worked at manual labor in that State until he was sixteen years of age, when he came to Indiana and began learning the cabinet-maker's trade, at Princeton. Having mastered his trade he came to Washington in 1858, and entered the employ of Mattingly & Mulholland, remaining with them until 1861, when he enlisted as a private soldier in Company H, Twenty-fourth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving in the army until the close of the war, and being in all the battles in which his division, under Gen. A. P. Hovey, was engaged. After being discharged, at Galveston, Tex., he returned to Washington and entered the employ of Mattingly & Bonham, working for them until 1872, when Mr. Mattingly died. He continued with Mr Bonham until 1874, when he purchased one-half interest in the business, and has since been a partner in the firm of Bonham & Gill. Mr. Gill is a Republican in politics; is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., of K. of H., and of the G. A. R., and is an enterprising, successful business man. In 1868 he was married to Mary E. Carnahan, a native of Daviess County, by whom he has six children, named Jennie, James, Charles H., Laura, Helen and Joseph.

JOHN J. GLENDENING, book-keeper for Cabel, Wilson & Co., Washington, Ind., was born in Allegheny County, Penn., October 13, 1845, being one of a family of six children, three of whom only are living, born to Joseph and Martha (Strauss) Glendening, natives of Pennsylvania. In 1853 they removed from Pennsylvania to Jefferson County, Ind., where the father died, and where the mother still resides. The subject of this sketch was reared by his parents in Pennsylvania and in Jefferson County, Ind., and obtained a good literary education. He was engaged in teaching school from 1865 to 1870, when he came to Washington and entered the employ of Cabel, Wilson & Co., in the capacity of book-keeper, which position he has ever since filled in a faithful and efficient manner. He was married, October 13, 1875, to Miss Harriet E. Wright, of Daviess County, by whom he has three children: Harriet E., Pearl and John. Mr. Glendening is a stanch Republican, and has served one term as member of the city council. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and W. M. of Charity Lodge, No. 30, of Washington. He is also a member of the Odd Fellows Lodge, and is universally recognized as a moral and upright citizen of Daviess County.

THOMAS B. GRAHAM, SR., deceased, a prominent citizen of Daviess County, was a Kentuckian by birth, and was one of eight children born to James and Jane (Mitchell) Graham, who were natives of Delaware and Pennsylvania, respectively. James Graham was born about 1772. He moved to Kentucky after attaining his majority, and there married the mother, who was about two years younger than himself. They came to Daviess County, Ind., in 1826. They both died in September, 1838, within four days of each other. Thomas B., Sr., was born December 1, 1806, and was reared in Nicholas and Bourbon Counties, Ky., and there learned the saddler's trade. After coming to Indiana he remained a resident of Daviess County up to the time of his death. His early business life was in the retail general merchandising, and was marked by that success which characterized his whole business life. At different times he was associated in business with Elisha Hyatt, Col. John Van Trees and John Fairchild. He was first married to Lydia McCormick, and after her death to Charlotte Foote, who also died. No children survive these wives. In 1847 he was married to Margaret Hyatt, daughter of Thomas Hyatt, an early pioneer of the county. To his last marriage seven children were born, five of whom are living: Laura, Edith (wife of Dr. J. N. Jones), Ziba, a prominent farmer residing in the city, Lillie (wife of Warren Sherman, of Rossville, K as.), and Thomas B. In politics Mr. Graham was a zealous Republican, but did not mingle in political schemes. He was a self-made and successful man, and has aided much in the progress of the county. Ziba F. Graham. son of Thomas and Margaret (Hyatt) Graham, was born August 30, 1853, and remained with his parents until twenty-four years of age. He then married Margaret A. Cabel, daughter of Joseph Cabel, of Washington, Ind. They have two children: Joseph B. and Robert C. Politically Mr. Graham is a Republican, and is a farmer and stock dealer by occupation. He owns 1,440 acres of fine farming land, about 1,000 acres of which are under cultivation. He is a prosperous and wide-awake young farmer.

RICHARD HENRY GREENWOOD, treasurer of Daviess County, was born in Madison Township December 20, 1836. In 1846 his parents moved to Greene County, where they remained five years, and then returned to Daviess County, and lived in Elmore Township two years. They then settled in Washington Township, four miles southwest of Washington. where they still reside. The subject of this sketch was married February 2. 1860, and during that and the following year was engaged in farming —one year in Veal Township and the next in Reeve. On the 25th of August, 1862, he enlisted in the Twenty-seventh Regiment, Company D, under Capt. John Cassidy. He remained in the service until June, 1865, when he was mustered out, the war having come to a close. He participated in several of the hard-fought battles of the Rebellion, notably at Chancellorsville, Antietam and Gettysburg, and through the Atlanta campaign and Sherman's march to the sea. At Antietam he received a bullet wound, which disabled him for active service for about six weeks. Upon his return from the war he became an employe of Elisha Hyatt, acting for a number of years as a kind of general overseer of Mr. Hyatt's business at Tom's Hill and vicinity. He then returned to his early occupation of farming, in Steele Township,and in 1880 was elected trustee of the township. Having filled this position creditably for two years, the Democratic party in 1882 nominated him for the office of county treasurer, and elected him over the candidate of the Republican party by a majority of 229. In 1884 he was re-elected to the same office, over Martin Nugent, a prominent and wealthy farmer of Elmore Township, by a plurality of 367. Mr. Greenwood is an honest and upright man, and an excellent public servant. He is a good. citizen, and a representative of the laboring classes. He has a family of six children—five sons and one daughter—the latter of whom has been of much service to her father in the office of county treasurer.

ALEXANDER M. HARDY, attorney at law of Washington, Ind., was born in Ontario, Canada, in December, 1847, son of William and Sarah (Merrill) Hardy, who were natives of the same place. Alexander was reared with his parents, and secured a good literary education, attending the Victoria College of Coburg, Canada, and graduating from that institution. At the age of eighteen he began reading law, graduating from the University of Toronto, Canada, in 1866. He then came to the United States and located at Natchez, Miss., where he practiced his profession, and also engaged in the newspaper business. He was appointed collector of customs at that place in 1875, under Grant. He left that city in 1877 and went to Washington, D. C., where he was employed in the law department of the pension bureau until 1881. He then located in Paducah, where he was employed by the United States authorities as superintendent in building the Government Post office and Custom House. In 1885 he removed to this city, and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession. He is a stanch Republican, and has taken an active part in national politics since his residence in the States. He stumped Mississippi with Hon. John A. Lynch, in 1876 (for Hayes), and was in the campaign of 1880 in Indiana and New York, and during the campaign of 1884 was in Ohio. He was married to Elizabeth Lee. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. and K. of H.

A. J. HART was born near Washington, in Daviess County, Ind., and is one of eleven children born to the marriage of James Hart and Sarah King. The father was born on the Atlantic Ocean in 1793, coming from Ireland to America. His parents settled first in Tennessee, and then in. North Carolina, where the father was married. They came from there to Indiana, and here our subject was born November 15, 1831. His mother was a native of middle Tennessee, died when he was about twelve years of age, and he lived with his father until eighteen years of age, when he began doing for himself. He first began working on the Wabash & Erie Canal, and in six months' time was promoted to superintendent, and was given a force of seventy-five or one hundred men. Two years later he with sixteen men came to Daviess County, Ind., and commenced working on the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad. In the fall of 1853 he quit this work and commenced farming on some of the land. where he now lives. February 8, 1854, he was married to Mary, daughter of Matthew and Margaret (Hopkins) Arthur. She was born November 5, 1827. He cast his first vote for Buchanan, but since that time has been a Republican. He has been a member of the Masonic Lodge for sixteen years, and his wife a member of the Christian Church for twenty years. Mr. Hart owns 160 acres of land, 120 of which are in a good state of cultivation. In 1868 he gave up his farm life and kept a general merchandise store in Washington for three years, and then moved to Montgomery, where he followed the same occupation, and also operated a coal mine. In 1876 he returned to the farm, where he has since lived.

CHARMER HAWKINS, African, was born near Washington, Daviess Co., Ind., March 29, 1831, and is the fourth of a family of eleven children born to Jacob and Ellen (Embrey) Hawkins, who were natives of Charleston, S. C., where they were slaves. They came with their owners to Indiana when it was a Territory, and at its admittance into the Union as a State they obtained their freedom. The father was at this time sixteen years of age, and by his own energy and perseverance became the owner of over 1,000 acres of excellent farming land. His master's name was Hawkins, and he accordingly took that name after securing his freedom. He and wife were for some time members of the Presbyterian Church, and afterward of the African Methodist Church. The father died in 1864, and the mother in 1870. Our subject was reared on a farm, and received very limited educational advantages. He remained with his parents to the age of twenty-two years, when he married and settled on his present farm. He has been very prosperous in his undertakings, and is at the present time the owner of 260 acres of land in one tract, and thirty acres near Washington. His farm is well improved, and he has a fine two-story residence well furnished. In 1853 he was married to Malinda Grier. They have two children: Sylvester and Sarah E. This wife died January 17, 1873, and September 15, 1875, he was married to Millie Blakey, who has borne him four children: Dora, Clergain, Helen, and Charner. Both Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins are members of the African Methodist Church, and he is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and politically is a very zealous Republican. He is one of the prominent men of the county, and is recognized as a -highly honorable and upright citizen. His father was the first African in the county, and in his younger days often made trips to Vincennes, protected from the Indians by a number of armed men, to get barrels of salt for the neighbors.

FRANCIS M. HAYNES, attorney at law, of Washington, Ind.. was born in Lawrence County, this State, November 27, 1845, and is a son of John and Lavina (Sapp) Haynes, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Maryland, and of Irish and German descent. John Haynes removed to Daviess County with his family in 1849, and located on a farm in Bogard Township, where he resided until his death July 22, 1875. Francis M. was reared on a farm, and secured a good literary education, preparing himself for teaching, which profession he followed for two years. At the age of twenty he began studying Blackstone, and in 1872 came to this city and read law in the office of Judge James T. Perce. He was admitted to the Daviess County bar in 1878, and formed a partnership with his preceptor (Perce) and practiced law with him until his removal from the city in 1880. He then practiced with Levi Reeves until 1883, when he continued by himself until 1885, and then formed a partnership with A. M. Hardy, and the firm stands among the foremost ranks in the legal profession to-day. January 31, 1865, he married Matilda J. Burkett, a native of the county. Mr. Haynes is a Republican in politics, and takes an active interest in the local campaigns in the county. In September, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company G, Forty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving in this and Company I, Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry in the war of the Rebellion until July 13, 1865. He is a member of the Encampment of I. 0. 0. F. and G. A. R. He was wounded by the concussion of a shell at the battle of Resaca, Ga., producing spinal meningitis, from which he is still disabled. He receives a pension from the Government.

JUDGE DAVID J. HEFRON was born in Jennings County, Ind., February 18, 1842, and removed with his parents to Daviess County, Ind., and located on a farm in Barr Township, where he remained until about twenty years of age. He attended the township schools, and later was a student in the Mitchell High School. He taught for some time during the winter seasons and farmed during the summer, and afterward attended the literary department of the State University at Bloomington in 1866, and remained during the following year. He attended the law department of the same institution the winter of 1868-69, and came to Washington in February of the latter year, and entered the law office of Hon. John H. O'Neal. He was admitted to the bar and became a partner of Mr. O'Neal in 1870, and began practicing in 1871. This partnership was dissolved in 1872, but was resumed in 1874, and continued until the appointment of Mr. Hefron as judge of this circuit. The firm of O'Neal & Hefron was one of the most successful and prominent of law firms in the Second Congressional District, both gentlemen being attorneys of more than ordinary ability. Mr. Hefron was elected mayor of Washington in May, 1871, and re-elected in 1873. In 1876 he was chosen to represent Green and Daviess Counties in the State Legislature to fill an unexpired term of Hon. Andrew Humphrey, who had been elected to Congress. In 1878 he was re-elected to the State Senate for a term of four years, and was one of the most active members and the acknowledged leader of the Democratic senators. When the Forty-ninth Judicial Circuit was created, Gov. Gray immediately appointed Mr. Hefron judge of the new circuit, an appointment that met with universal approval. Politically Mr. Hefron is a Democrat, but a very liberal one. He is of Irish lineage, and was married, September 10, 1873, to Florence A. Barton, who died December 18, 1884, leaving four children. She was a daughter of Dr. G. G. Barton, of Washington, Ind. Our subject is essentially a self-made man.

HERMAN HIMBURG, was born in Prussia, Germany, October 19, 1832. He is the sixth of twelve children born to the marriage of Jacob Himburg and Mary Schram, who were also native Germans, and lived and died in their native land. Our subject was reared in a city of Germany, and obtained a good education in his native language, but never attended English schools. At the age of seventeen he left home and traveled as a barber over Europe until twenty-two years of age. He then came to America and located in Buffalo, N. Y., where he worked at his trade. At the end of six months he went to Canada, and after residing there four years he went to Louisville, Ky., where he remained about six months, and in 1858 moved to Washington, Ind., and worked at his trade about seven years, and also kept barroom. In 1872 or 1873 he moved to Lettsville, where he kept a store until October 17, 1884, when he was burned out with considerable loss. Since then he has followed farming exclusively, and now owns 333 acres of land well improved. He was united in marriage, January 22, 1855, to Mary Gento, a native of Germany, who came to America at the same time our subject did. Mr. Himburg is not a member of any church, but is a Lutheran in belief. Politically he has always been a Democrat, and has been postmaster of Lettsville for twelve years. He is a wide-awake business man and has the respect and esteem of all.

HIRAM HOGSHEAD was born in Daviess County, Ind., February 10, 1824, and is the third of ten children born to David and Mary (Logan) Hogshead, natives, respectively, of North Carolina and Kentucky. They were • married in Kentucky, and came to Martin County, Ind., where the father followed agricultural pursuits. After a short residence in that county they came to Daviess County, and there spent the remainder of their lives. They both died in 1879. Subject was reared on a farm near Washington, Ind., but received limited educational advantages. At the age of twenty-seven he married, and began farming and working at the cooper's trade, and continued that until 1863,when he came to Washington, and in connection with David Solomon worked very successfully at the cooper's trade for a short time. He then took a trip to California and Oregon, but soon returned to "Hoosierdom" and operated a saw-mill until about 1878, when he began the manufacture of tile, and still carries on that business. November 4, 1852, he wedded Martha Johnson, who died in 1861, having borne two children, one now living, Glenn (wife of William Frickie). October 1, 1862, Mr. Hogshead married his present wife, Susan Juvenall, a native of this county, born in 1834. These three children have blessed their union: Emma, Ephraim, and Mary. Mr. Hogshead is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and a Knight Templar of the Vincennes Commandery. In politics he has always been a Whig and Republican, and cast his first presidential vote for Taylor. He is a highly respected citizen, and an enterprising business man of the county.

ALBION HORRALL, postmaster, Washington, was born in Daviess County February 24, 1854, being the eldest of a family of seven children, five of whom are still living, born to Spillard F. and Jane (Crabb) Horrall, both natives of Daviess County, subject's grandfather having come to Daviess County by wagon from South Carolina in 1816, where he resided until his death in 1878. The father of our subject was prominent, and was for a number of years engaged in the newspaper business before the war. In September, 1861, he enlisted as second lieutenant of Company G, Forty-second Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving until the close of the war, and being promoted to first lieutenant and captain, and later was made an officer on Gen. John Beatty's staff. After the close of the war he was local editor of the Evansville Journal six years, and of the Evansville Courier one year. He was then local editor of the Terre Haute Gazette one year, when he returned to Washington and bought the Washington Gazette, which he conducted five or six years. He then removed to Vincennes and started the Vincennes Commercial, which he conducted three or four years, when he again returned to Washington and started the Weekly Commercial, which he ran, however, only a short time. Since then he has resided in Washington, retired from active labor. The subject of this sketch was brought up in the newspaper business with his father, his education having been obtained in the public schools and completed at Evansville. When he was seventeen years old he worked one year as mailing clerk on the Evansville Courier, and then one year on the Terre Haute Evening Gazette. Coming then to Washington he worked at the case in the office of the Washington Gazette until he was twenty-one years old, when he entered into partnership with his father on that paper, and later in the Vincennes Commercial, continuing thus until his appointment as postmaster at Washington in 1877. This position he filled faithfully and efficiently until 1886. In politics he has always been a stanch Republican and an active worker for his party. He is a Mason and a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He was married February 22, 1878, to Miss Mamie Harris, daughter of William P. Harris, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Horrall have three children: Pearl, Laura, and Pansy. Mr. Horrall attends the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which his family are members.

ELISHA HYATT (deceased) may be mentioned as one of the men who figured conspicuously in the financial affairs of the county. He was born in Mason County, Ky., October 4, 1809, and died December 31, 1885, at his home in Washington, Ind. He was a son of Thomas and Margaret Hyatt, and has been a resident of Daviess County since 1823. He remained on the farm and aided his parents until twenty-four years of age. After making several trips to New Orleans by boat, he engaged in the mercantile business with Thomas B. Graham, but the partnership was dissolved in 1842. He afterward operated a distillery for two years, and later was a partner with William Helpenstein in merchandising. Since 1875 he has been engaged in farming, steam-boating, pork-packing, timber traffic, and was president of the Hyatt, Leving & Co.'s Bank of Washington, Ind., which failed in 1884, causing him to lose his valuable estates and property. He was married in December, 1839, to Martha Beazley, a native of the county, born in 1817. To their union eight children were born, these five now living: Elizabeth (wife of Isaac Parsons, of Vincennes), Hiram, Lydia (wife of Hugh Rogers), Richard, and Elisha. Politically Mr. Hyatt was a Whig and Republican, and has been a zealous member of his party.. His credit was almost unlimited, and he was recognized by all as one who did much to benefit Daviess County and the city of Washington.

HON. JOHN HYATT, a prominent citizen of Daviess County, was born in Mason County, Ky., September 4, 1814. He is one of the four surviving members of a family of three sons and four daughters born to Thomas and Margaret (McPherson) Hyatt. The father, who was of German descent, was born in Hyattstown, Md. ; removed to Kentucky when he was a young man, married there and in 1823 moved to Daviess County, Ind. Here, he purchased what has since been known as the -Hyatt" farm, one-half mile north of Washington, upon which he resided until his death a short time before the breaking out of the war of the Rebellion. He was well and favorably known throughout the county as one of its most enterprising and successful farmers, and as a moral, upright man. The mother of John Hyatt was of Irish descent, of Pennsylvania birth, and died on the homestead five years after the death of her husband. John Hyatt was brought up on the farm with his parents, and secured a limited education in the primitive schools of Daviess County, but he greatly improved upon this rudimentary education in later life by actual and continued contact with business life. After attaining his majority he engaged as clerk with the firm of Graham & Hyatt, and continued with them four or five years. In 1839 he engaged. in the grocery business in Washington on his own account, continuing in that business exclusively two years, at the end of which time he added dry goods to his stock, and conducted these two kinds of business until 1875 without interruption. By thirty-five years' experience and attention to business he succeeded in establishing a large and lucrative trade and a comfortable competency. Unfortunately, however, in later years, he became crippled financially by security, which illustrates the generous nature of Mr. Hyatt, and at the same time the folly of becoming surety for a friend. Mr. Hyatt was originally an old-time Whig, but is now a Green-backer. In 1840 he was elected recorder of Daviess County, serving seven years. In 1868 he was elected by the Democratic party to represent them in the Indiana State Legislature, serving in the session of 1869, and resigning with others on account of the trouble occasioned by the introduction of the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States. He was re-elected to the called session of 1869.
He has always taken an active interest in public and private enterprises in the county, and has especially devoted his attention and means to educational advancement. He has been a member of the school board a number of times and also of the city council. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and while he is not a member of any sectarian church, yet he believes mainly in the teachings of the Bible and extends a helping hand to the church. Mr. Hyatt has been married four times, and has lost three wives by death. By his first wife, who was Miss Elizabeth J. Gastings, he was the father of seven children, four of whom are now living: Henry H., Fielding A., Samuel and Anna A., the latter now Mrs. William Gibson, of Salina, Kas. By his second wife, who was Mary Burns, he had one child, Charles, who is still living. By his marriage with Elizabeth Bruner he had three children, two of whom are now living: Cora (Mrs. E. R. Tuttle, of St. Louis), and Anna (Mrs. Charles Ohmer, of Indianapolis). He was married to his present wife, formerly Bertha Brayfield, May 12, 1874. By her he has two children: Francis and Edgar.


GEORGE HYATT was the second of five children born to William and Rebecca (Read) Hyatt, both natives of the county, and grandson of Thomas Hyatt, who was born in Kentucky and came to Indiana in 1823, and settled on the farm where our subject now lives. He was a prominent man of the county, and all the Hyatts of the county are his descendants. He died September 22, 1848. His wife, Margaret (McFerran) Hyatt, died May 17, 1858. Our subject's father was born in 1823 on a farm, and there lived until about forty-five years of age, when he moved to town and was engaged in the merchandise business for six or seven years. He then retired from that business and dealt in stock, and at his death, June 2, 1885, owned 300 acres of fine land adjoining town. He was twice married. By his first wife, Rebecca A. Read, whom he married November 23, 1847, he became the father of these children: Mary, George, Margaret, Helen and Rebecca. This wife died April 2, 1858, and he then married Margaret McClure, who bore him one child—Thomas. His last marriage was September 11, 1884, to Mrs. Ella A. Coup, who survives him. Our immediate subject was born July 10, 1850, and was reared on the farm and secured a good education in the graded schools. At the age of twenty-eight he went to California, but remained there but six months, when he returned and engaged in the general merchandise business in Epsom. At the end of three years he purchased an interest in the Washington Mills and Foundry, which was afterward destroyed by fire. In August, 1885, he began farming on the old place and now owns 270 acres of land, part of which is adjacent to town and very valuable. September 4, 1881, he was married to Florence R. Carter, a native of the county. They have these three children: William, Alice and Mary. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and a Republican in politics.

HENRY H. HYATT was born in Washington, Ind., June 22, 1842, and is the second of six children born to John and Elizabeth J. (Geetings) Hyatt. He was raised in the city and secured a common school education. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in Company D, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers July 2, 1861, and served his country three years, but remained uninjured. After his return home he engaged with his father and brother in the dry goods business, continuing very successfully until 1883. He then took charge of the Hyatt House until 1885, when he abandoned that work, and is not now actively engaged in business. He owns 780 acres of land, a portion of which is the finest in the county in regard to fertility and location. He was married September 5, 1864, to Mary E. Hoffmeister, a native of the county and daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Hoffraeister, of this city. To them were born six children, two of whom died in infancy. Those living are Clara, Hattie, Elizabeth and Robert C. Mr. Hyatt is a Knight Templar Mason, Encampment of Odd Fellows and Uniform Degree of G. A. R., K. of H. and K. of P. He and family are members of the Presbyterian Church, and in politics he is a very zealous Republican. He has been connected with the business interests of the city since attaining his majority, and is one of the first citizens of the county.

JOHN JACKSON, farmer and stock raiser, is a native of the " Sucker State," born February 15, 1830, son of Daniel and Alice (Colbert) Jackson, and is of Irish descent, and the seventh of thirteen children. His father was born in N. Y. in 1797, and his mother in Ohio in 1804. The grandfather was born in Ireland, but came to America and died in Pennsylvania. The Jackson family came to Daviess County, Ind., about 1830 and settled in Washington Township for a few years and then moved to Harrison Township, where the father died in 1879, and his mother in 1880. Our subject spent his boyhood days on a farm, and received but little schooling. At the age of twenty-one he began for himself and worked by the month for two years, and then began farming on his own responsibility. In 1880 he moved on his present farm, and now owns 713 acres of land, nearly all of which is well improved. He was married, in November, 1856, to Miss Melinda Chapman, born in Harrison Township in 1837, daughter of R. S. Chapman. They have six children, viz.: Eli M., Milton M., Charles M., Anna M., Stella M. and Harlie M. Mr. Jackson is a Republican in his political views, and is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He takes great interest in the advancement of agriculture, and is noted as a breeder of short-horn cattle and fine hogs. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is one of the leading farmers of the county.

NATHAN H. JEPSON, watch-maker and jeweler of Washington, Ind., was born in Belmont County, Ohio, January, 28, 1835, and is a son of John and Hannah (Hunt) Jepson, both natives of Lancastershire, England. The former came to the United States as early as 1825, locating first in Troy, N. Y., and seven years later removed to Belmont County, Ohio. Here he followed farming until late in life, when he devoted his attention to mercantile pursuits, in which he remained engaged until disqualified for business by old age. He died in Belmont County in February, 1884, in his ninetieth year. The subject of this sketch was brought up by his parents in St. Clairsville, Ohio, where he obtained a fair literary education. He clerked in his father's store until he was nineteen years old, when he went to Cadiz, Harrison Co., Ohio, to learn the watch-maker's and jeweler's trade. Remaining there one and a half years he engaged in the business for himself at Steubenville, Ohio. In 1864 he enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Fifty-seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served in that regiment four months as orderly sergeant. At the close of the war he established himself in business at Urbana, Ohio, where he remained until 1870, when he came to Washington, Ind., where he has continued at the same business ever since. He carries a full and select line of watches, clocks, jewelry and silverware, and enjoys a large trade both in the city and county. Mr. Jepson is a sound Republican in politics, and has taken an active interest in the welfare of his party since his residence in the county. He was a member of the Republican State Central Committee during the campaign of 1882, but declined the position in 1884, as he was a candidate for nomination to the office of secretary of State before the Republican convention. He has been chairman of the city Republican committee a number of years, was a member of city council two years, and has on several occasions declined the nomination for mayor. He is a member of the U. S. Grant Post, No. 72, G. A. R., of Washington. In 1863 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Black, a native of Columbiana County, Ohio. They have three children: John S., Lucy T, and Jessie Hunt. Both Mr. and Mrs. Jepson are members of the Presbyterian Church, he himself being one of the deacons, and he is universally and justly recognized as one of the leading, enterprising and successful business men of the community.

JAMES JOHNSON, the subject of this sketch, was born in Pennsylvania in the year 1752, was of Scotch parentage, and at the age of about thirty-eight, immigrated to what was then the Territory of Indiana. He, with nine other families, ran down the Ohio River, on what was known as keel-boats, until the Wabash was reached. Then those few pioneers poled, pulled, and rowed up the river until the little French town of Vincennes was reached, where they disembarked, and for a time mingled with the French and Indians. These were the first Americans that made a permanent residence in Knox County, if not the first in the State. These people had moved to the New World with the hope of bettering their condition in life, and they, being farmers by occupation, were satisfied with the outlook near Vincennes, and soon became settled on Government land, cleared the forests and were rewarded by successfully reaping largely of their growing crops. This colony was composed of brave and daring spirits, and most of that company lived to a green old age Mr. Johnson was blessed with a family of thirteen children ; the greater number of them lived to settle in life before their father's death, which occurred about 1833, being buried with the honors of war, he having for three years been a soldier in the Revolutionary war. So fell this man of toil, who was willing to leave home, nativity, and all that he held dear, that in the wilds of the far West, he might rear a home and leave a competency for his family. His ashes lie in an almost forgotten and neglected family burying ground in Knox County, and according to his religious belief will rest until he shall " meet the Lord in the air." He has many descendants yet living.

JOHN L. JOHNSON, the eldest son of the above sketch, was born in 1782, and when a small youth with his father, shared the wilds of a Western life; he could at the age of ninety years, name each one of the ten families, who together, in 1790, came to the "territory of Knox:" he retained to a remarkable degree his memory to the day of his death. He died to the advanced age of ninety-two years ; for sixty-five years he lived continuously in the same home in Daviess County; his companion during all this time, sharing his trials and joys, died two months later. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and participated in a number of important engagements, and at the time of his death was a pensioner on the Government, because of services rendered in that war. His politics were those of his father, Whig, and later Republican; his religious sympathies were with the Methodist Episcopal Church, he having been identified with that denomination from boyhood. " He now rests from his labors." One of his brothers, Friend, moved West with the retreating Indians; he was a silversmith by trade. He died near Muscatine, Iowa. Another brother, Elijah, who was born in 1796, met his death by a falling tree in 1848, in Daviess County, Ind. His religion and politics were the same as his elder brother's. He left a family of nine children, eight of whom are still living, and whose average age is fifty-four years. William Johnson, a brother, was said to be the first American child born in the State of Indiana; in politics he differed from the rest, as he died a Democrat. George, the youngest, is at this writing alive, being the only one left of the large family. His seventy-seven years sit lightly upon him; he now lives near Sumner, Ill.

ALFRED E. JOHNSON, farmer, was born in Washington Township, March 2, 1840, son of Elijah and Mildred (Horrell) Johnson. The family is of Scotch origin, and the fathei was born in what is now Knox County, Ind., in 1796, and the mother in South Carolina, in 1802. The grandfather was Peter Johnson, a Pennsylvanian, born in 1758, and immigrated to what is now Indiana in 1790. He was a Revolutionary soldier and died in Daviess County at a ripe old age. The mother died in 1855. Alfred E. grew to manhood on the old Johnson homestead, and secured a common school education. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Twenty-fourth Indiana" Volunteer Infantry, for three years or during the war. He was at the siege of Vicksburg, Champion Hills, Edwards' Ferry, Jackson, Miss., and Mobile. He was wounded at Champion Hills, and received his discharge in 1865. He has since farmed and owns seventy-four acres of well-improved land. He was married, October 13, 1870, to Miss F. E. Bachelor, a native of Washington Township, born in 1824. They have four children, viz.: Hugh C., Elva M., Edie L. and Grant C. He is a Republican, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has been a member of the I. 0. 0. F. since 1864.

NELSON JOHNSON, a representative of one of the first Indiana families, farmer, and one of the leading stockmen of this county, vice-president of the Daviess County Agricultural Society, was born in Veal Township, this county, January 3, 1835, son of Elijah and Mildred (Horrell) Johnson, and of Scotch descent. Of eight children he is the sixth. At one year of age he was, by his parents, removed to where he now lives, on what is known as the old Johnson homestead, which consisted of eighty acres. He came into possession of the homestead in 1855. He engaged in farming in early life, and has since continued, and now owns 285 acres of good land. For fifteen years he has been paying attention to stock and stock raising, and has made several trips to Canada in stock interests. He has many fine Cotswold sheep and Clydesdale horses. He was married, in 1854, to Miss Martha E. Hummer, a native of Knox County. They have five children: Theodore, William S., Hayden H., Emmons and Dovie. He is a Republican, and joined the Methodist Episcopal Church at fourteen years of age. His wife is a member of the same church. He has been very successful and is one of the representative farmers of the county.

CAPT. ZACHARIAH JONES, a highly respected citizen of Daviess County, was born in Pottsville, Penn., September 28, 1841, and is one of five living children of Renna and Louisa (Madara) Jones, natives, respectively, of South Carolina and Pennsylvania. His father came to Daviess County with his parents at an early day and lived here until he had arrived at the age of manhood, when he returned to Pennsylvania, married and lived in that State until 1861. He then returned to Daviess County, and has since resided. here on a farm. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and secured a common school education in his youthful days. At the age of ten he began learning the cigar-maker's trade, which he followed until 1861, when he enlisted in the Sixth Pennsylvania Infantry, serving out the time of his enlistment—three months. He then came to Daviess County and enlisted in Company H, Fifty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving until the close of the war. He was promoted from orderly sergeant to second and first lieutenant, and was brevetted captain at the close of the war. After the battle of Stone River he was appointed. to the staff of Gen. Buell, and was serving on Gen. Hooker's staff when mustered out of service. He returned to Washington and engaged in the cigar and tobacco business, which he continued with good success until 1873. This business he resumed in 1876 and conducted until 1885, when he engaged in the general grocery business, which he is now conducting with a fair measure of success. He carries a full and select stock of goods and enjoys a large share of trade. He has always been a stanch Republican, and in 1878 was elected by his party sheriff of Daviess County, serving one term faithfully and efficiently. He is a Mason and a member of the I. 0. 0. F. In 1865 he was married to Eliza A. Eads, by whom he had four children, three of whom are now living: Alfred C., Cora C. and Lucy May.

WILLIAM H. JONES, a prominent farmer of Daviess County, Ind., was the second of eight children, whose parents were Thomas H., and Ruth L. (Freeland) Jones, who were natives of this county. The father was born in Reeve Township, in 1824; and followed the occupation of farming all his life, and proved very successful in that calling. At the time of his marriage he was $50 in debt and at his death, in 1876, was worth probably $20,000. The mother was born in 1832, and died in 1882. They were married in 1849. The paternal grandfather, William Jones, was one of the early pioneer settlers of Daviess County, Ind., and was a native of North Carolina. The immediate subject of this sketch was born in Reeve Township, September 18, 1852. He secured a common school education, and attended a six months' term at Washington. He remained with his parents until twenty-two years of age, when he married and located on the farm where he now lives, which was then part of the father's farm. He has been exceptionally prosperous as a farmer, and his farm is under excellent cultivation. October 25, 1874, he was married to Mary Jane Isnogle, a native of the county, born September 17, 1852. Five children were born to them: Oscar (deceased), Ophia, Gertrude, Florence (deceased) and Jacob. Mr. Jones and wife are church members, and he has always been a Republican politically, and is one of the first men of the county.


JARIT KEITH, a very prominent farmer and native of Daviess County, Ind., was born January 22, 1821. He is the fourth of eleven children born to the marriage of George H. Keith and Abbariller Perkins. The father was born in Georgia in 1790, and died in 1858, and the mother born in Kentucky in 1795, and died in 1879. The father was a farmer, and came to this county as early as 1819, and was one of the first men of the county. Jarit was reared on the home farm, but only secured such education as could be obtained in the schoolhouses of pioneer times. At the age of twenty-three he began farming for himself, and two years later located near Edwardsport, where he remained. one year, and then purchased land in Knox County, where he remained until the spring of 1860, and then moved to his present place—the old homestead farm. He has been very prosperous in his enterprises, and now owns over 1,600 acres, nearly all of which is very fine land. He has large barns and a commodious two-story frame residence with convenient surroundings. December 25, 1844, he was united in marriage to Rhoda Jane Lester, a native of the county. To them were born ten children, seven now living: William H., George, Isaac H., Julia A., Louis, Martha and Mary J. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Keith is and always has been a zealous Republican, but has never aspired to office. He is a good example of the self-made man, as he started in life a poor boy, and now is one of the wealthiest land holders in the county. Besides this he has the good will and respect of all who know him.

JOHN H KIDWELL, recorder of Daviess County, was born in Washington County, Ky., June 12, 1844. In 1848 his parents removed to Daviess County, Ind., and settled on a farm near St. Mary's Church, Barr Township. On this farm the subject of this sketch lived until he was twelve years old, when he went to Montgomery Station and clerked in a store about eleven years. In 1868 he was elected trustee of Barr Township, and served two terms. In 1878 he removed to Washington and became a candidate for the nomination to the office of recorder, and stood second on the list of about a dozen candidates, being defeated by John Whitesides. After this defeat he clerked four years in the boot and shoe store of John Reinsel in Washington. In November, 1882, he was elected by the Democratic party recorder of the county, over Solomon Williams, by a majority of 389. Mr. Kidwell was married, in 1865, to Miss Barbara E. Dant, by whom he has six children—four sons and two daughters. Mr. Kidwell is a good officer, polite and obliging to all. He is an excellent gentleman and a member of the Catholic Church.

THOMAS J. LAVELLE, a prominent citizen and native of Daviess County, Ind., was born March 28, 1845, and is a son of Michael Lavelle, of this county. He was reared on a farm with his parents, and secured a good literary education. At the age of seventeen he began teaching in this county, and followed that occupation until thirty years of age, and met with good and well deserved success in this profession. In 1874 he was elected to the office of auditor of Daviess County, by the Democratic party, and removed to Washington, where he filled the office in a very commendable way. He was re-elected in 1878, being the only candidate on the Democratic ticket elected to office that year. In 1883 his brother, James C., was elected to the office, and since that time he has served as deputy under him. Mr. Lavelle is an unswerving Democrat in politics, and has taken an active interest in the political affairs of the county for the past two years. He is a member of the Catholic Church, and is recognized as one of the enterprising and successful citizens of the county. He is quite well-to-do, financially, and owns a one-half interest in the dry goods store of Menzel & Co., of Washington.

JAMES CALLISTUS LAVELLE, auditor of DaviPss County, was born in Barr Township October 14, 1848. He worked upon his father's farm and attended the district schools of the township until he was qualified to enter the Washington High School. After spending one term at this school, he spent a year at the State University at Bloomington, and a year at Notre Dame University, a Catholic institution in the northern part of the State. He taught school six terms in Barr Township and learned telegraphy in the Ohio & Mississippi office at Montgomery. For some time he had charge of the telegraph offices at Eldorado, Shawneetown and Enfield, in Illinois, on the line of railroad then called the St. Louis & Southeastern. During the time he worked at telegraphy he studied medicine and acquired a knowledge of the profession, but never practiced except to attend a few cases with Dr. Campbell at Loogootee, where he spent a year. In 1876 he became deputy auditor, under his brother, Thomas J. Lavelle, who had been elected to the office in 1874. He has been continuously in the auditor's office since that time, his brother having been re-elected in 1878. In 1882 he was nominated by the Democratic party as their candidate for county auditor, and after a hard-fought battle was elected over the Republican candidate, Milton Haynes, by a majority of 582, showing that he drew a large number of Republican votes. While he has been in the auditor's office he has invented and constructed several valuable forms for simplifying the office work, among them a record for school fund bonds and an apportionment record, the latter showing the settlement made by the auditor with the treasurer. This record has been largely adopted by auditors throughout the State. He has also invented a form of record for the use of assessors, a book containing both the assessments and statistical reports. This record has been patented and its general use would save thousands of dollars annually to the State. Mr. Lavelle was married, February 18, 1879, to Miss Mattie Thompson, only daughter of Ephriam Thompson. They have one child, a daughter. Mr. Lavelle is a member of the ancient order of Hibernians and of the Catholic Church.

H. L. LOORBIDGE, proprietor of the principal livery barn of the city, was born in Franklin, Tenn., March 24, 1857, and was. the eldest of five children born to the marriage of William Lochridge and Elizabeth Horton, who were natives of South Carolina and Virginia, and born in 1819 and 1822, respectively.. They were married in Tennessee and have since made their home in Franklin, where the father dealt in general merchandise until recently, when he retired from active business life. Our subject was reared in his native town, where he obtained a fair education, and afterward attended college at Nashville for four years. At the age of seventeen he left home and began the agency business and later was a traveling agent for a clothing house. In December, 1884, he located at Washington, Ind., and engaged in the livery business, in which he has done well financially. He has the best stock in the city and the leading trade.. August 23, 1882, he was married to Leanore Smith, a native of West Virginia. They have one child, a daughter, named Leo, born November 27, 1883. In politics he is a Democrat, and is a highly respected business man of the city.

REV. T. A. LONG was born in Hawkins County, East Tennessee, November 15, 1832, son of William and Mary (Ball) Long, who were born in Tennessee in 1804 and 1799, respectively. His paternal grandfather was from Virginia, and his maternal ancestors were natives of Pennsylvania. He removed with his parents to Indiana when about ten years, old and settled in Daviess County, about three miles from Washington. Here our subject was, reared until of age. He received a common school education and afterward attended college at South Hanover, Ind., where he prepared himself for the ministry. After completing his studies he came home and entered the conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. September 15, 1855, he was appointed pastor of a circuit in Pike County, and was for thirty years a minister in Pike, Green, Daviess, Lawrence, Harrison and Washington Counties. September 14, 1854, he was married to Sarah J. Bachelor, a native of Daviess County, who died April 6, 1864, having borne these five children: Frank C., Martha A., Ida P. (deceased), John B. and Inda R (deceased). Mr. Long married Mary Batchelor September 18, 1864, who bore him these children: Laura A., Enoch E., Ezra H. and Lillie M. Subject gave up the ministerial work in 1875, having broken down in voice, and returned to the farm. He was the means of bringing 1,000 souls into the church, and married 262 couples and preached 350 funeral sermons. He is a Republican and is an ancient member of the Odd Fellows. He has eighty-two acres of land, under which lie beds of coal. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and both are beloved and respected by all.

JOSEPH C. LORD, superintendent Washington Gas Works, was born in Manchester, England, January 17, 1853, and is a son of Charles and Sarah (Ashton) Lord, both natives of England, where the former died and where the latter still resides. The subject of this sketch was brought up and educated in England by his parents. At the age of ten years he became engaged with his father in his present line of business, and remained thus engaged until 1873, when he came to the United States. At first he took charge of the gas works at Warren, Penn., and then in 1874 superintended the building of the gas works at Ashtabula, Ohio, and for a short time afterward had charge of them. He then took charge of the gas-fitting department of the Shelbyville, Ind., Gas Works; then held the same position at Crawfordsville, Ind. ; next at Anderson, Ind., and finally, in 1876, came to Washington and took charge of the gas-fitting in the construction of the Washington Gas Works, and upon their completion was made superintendent of them, which office he has ever since continued to fill in a faithful and efficient manner. Mr. Lord also conducted the Meredith Hotel during the years 1882-83, but was compelled to relinquish the duties of this position in order to attend more closely to the duties of superintendent of the gas works. In 1875 he was marrried to Mrs. Esther Bonner, of Anderson, Ind., by whom he has two children: Charles P. and Esther. In politics Mr. Lord is a Democrat.

THOMAS LYNCH may be mentioned as one of the prominent farmers of Daviess County, Lid. He is a son of Jesse and Martha (Bradford) Lynch, who were born and reared in North Carolina, and about 1814 came to Daviess County, Ind., with their parents. Here they married, lived and died. The father was a blacksmith, and had one of the leading shops in the city. He died when Thomas was quite a small boy. The mother lived until about 1870. Our subject was born and reared in Washington, his birth occurring in 1824, but obtained a limited education. At the age of fourteen he began making his home with his uncle, and remained with him until his death. He then rented his uncle's land, and now owns 150 acres of the best farming land in the county. In 1855 he was united in marriage to Minerva Samples, a native of the county. To them were born these children: Emma (wife of Robert Brown), Della (wife of Andrew Palmer), Grace (wife of Dickson Carroll), George and William. All are doing welL Politically he has been a Republican all his life, and is a prominent man of the county.

MRS. J. L. MARMADUKE is the widow of Milton Marmaduke, who was born in Mason County, Ky. His parents were natives of Virginia and Kentucky, and he was born April 31, 1823, and when nine months old was brought to Indiana by his parents and located near Washington. When Milton was about sixteen years old his father died, and he was left to assist his mother and care for his brothers and sisters, and was given the homestead farm of forty acres, on which he lived until his death. A few years previous to his death he took an interest in the furniture business with his brother Silas, in Washington, continuing two years, when he sold out to John Cruse. His death occurred November 22, 1877. February 10, 1853, he was married to Sallie Arthur, daughter of John and Nancy Arthur, who bore one child: Frank, now living in Kansas. His wife died in August, 1864, and he took for his second wife Jane L. Feagans, daughter of Derostos and Maria (Robinson) Feagans, of Kentucky. She was born August 10, 1836, and bore these five children: William W., Jesse D., James L., Carrie L. (deceased) and one who died in infancy. In politics Mr. Marmaduke was a Republican, and was a member of the Baptist Church from early life. At the time of his death he owned 200 acres of land, and bad other valuable property. His widow and her three children now reside in Washington, and she owns seventy-six acres of the old homestead, besides her town property.

FREDERICK A. MENZEL, druggist, of Washington, Ind., was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 1, 1854. His parents were Gustavus A. and Caroline Menzel, who were Germans by descent, but natives, respectively, of England and Germany. Our subject was raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he secured a good literary and business education. At the age of thirteen he engaged in the drug business in that city, acquiring a thorough knowledge of the business, and graduating from the Cincinnati College of Pharmacy in 1874. In March, 1875, he came to this city, and was engaged as clerk for S. T. Baldwin & Co. until 1883, when he purchased a one-half interest in the business, and has since conducted it very successfully under the firm name of Menzel & Co., .Thomas J. Lavelle being his partner. They carry a full and choice line of drugs, oils and paints, in which they do an extensive wholesale and retail business. They also keep a full line of fancy and toilet articles, books and stationery, and control a large share of the trade in city and county. Their goods occupy the first and second stories, besides a small warehouse near the depot. Mr. Menzel is a member of the Democratic party, and belongs to the Lutheran Church.

THOMAS MEREDITH was born in South Carolina in the year 1789. He served in the war of 1812, in a regiment from South Carolina. He immigrated. to Daviess County, Ind., in 1815, and was married to Elizabeth Ruggles, who at the age of eleven years came to the same county with her parents and grandparents from Maysville, Mason Co., Ky. The country was so sparsely settled, and the Indians so troublesome, they were compelled to seek safety in Purcell's Fort. Thomas Meredith continued to live in Daviess County till his death in 1859, aged seventy years. Thomas Meredith was the father of ten children, all of whom lived to manhood and womanhood except one. The house of Thomas Meredith was used for a place of worship until the Methodist Society could afford better accommodation. Grandma Meredith, who is still living at the age of eighty-seven, has the honor of having made the first carpet for the Methodist Episcopal Church in Washington. Of Thomas Meredith there are twenty-three living grandchildren, and eighteen dead, and of great-grandchildren seventeen are living, and eighteen are dead. The children of Thomas Meredith are William S. Meredith, born February 3, 1818; Burrill T. Meredith, born December 23, 1819; James H. Meredith, born January 28, 1822; Thomas A. Meredith, born July 17, 1825, died March 30, 1885; Rachel J. (Tate) Meredith, born December 3, 1857; Mary A. (Cloud) Meredith, born July 4, 1830; Elizabeth (Haynes) Meredith, born February 28, 1832, died February 24, 1884; Martha M. Meredith, born June 4, 1835, died July 15, 1835; Aaron H. Meredith, born September 18, 1836, died March 16, 1871; and Elisha A. Meredith, born July 1, 1839. Of the grandsons is W. R. Meredith, born February 28, 1845. Young Meredith began his business career by selling newspapers. He afterward engaged in the mercantile trade for a short time, and when the clash of arms came he volunteered into the service, and served through the war. After his return from the war he began trading in horses, mules, and selling carriages, and soon after engaged in the livery business, which he still follows. Mr. W. R. Meredith is now the owner of a good stable and several farms. and is considered one of the best financiers of the county.

CAPT. SAMUEL H. MULHOLLAND, of Washington, was born in Wyandotte County, Ohio, February 25, 1836, being one of a family of seven children born to Richard and Margaret (Harmon) Mulholland, natives, respectively, of Pennsylvania and Virginia. Samuel H. was brought up by his parents in his native county, and there secured a fair English education. At the age of seventeen he learned the cabinet-making business, and worked at the trade until he was twenty years of age. He then left the parental roof and came to Washington, where he started a cabinet-maker's shop. One year later he took in as partner John Mattingly, and they continued in the business with a fair measure of success until the breaking out of the war, when Mr Mulholland organized Company I, Sixty-fifth Indiana -Volunteer Infantry, and served as captain of the company during the entire period of the war. After the close of the war he returned to Washington Township and engaged in farming until 1878, when he removed to Washington, and assisted in organizing the Washington Furniture Company, and managed its business one year. He then opened a sales-room for furniture, and has conducted this business successfully ever since. Capt. Mulholland is a sound, consistent Republican, and has taken an active part in politics. He was elected trustee of Washington Township in 1870, and was re-elected in 1872. He was again elected in 1878, and served one more term in a faithful and efficient manner. He served as member of city council during 1883 and 1884. He is a Royal Arch Mason, is a member of the K. of H., and of the G. A. R., and is justly regarded as an enterprising and successful business man, and as a moral and upright citizen. Mr. Mulholland was married, in November, 1868, to Ellen Kidwell, a 'native of Daviess County, by whom he has three children, named Martha A., Sarah J., and Stella.

FRANK A. MYERS, editor and manager of the Washington Gazelle, was born near Strasburg, Tuscarawas Co., Ohio, December 28, 1848, being a son of the Rev. Absalom and Nancy (Gorsage) Myers, both natives of Ohio. His parents removed to Daviess County in 1861, the father locating first in Van Buren Township, and soon after in Barr Township, where he purchased a farm upon which he still resides. The subject of this sketch was reared with his parents, secured a good literary education, and graduated from the Hartsville (Indiana) University in 1875. During his attendance at this University he started a newspaper called the Literary Ensign, conducting it until he left college, and selling it at that time. He also taught school in this county in order to secure means to enable him to finish his education. He made teaching his profession from 1875 to 1878, when, on account of failing health, he relinquished the profession of teaching, and became city editor of the Columbus (Indiana) Daily Republican, a position which he retained one year. Then in order to recuperate his health he acted one year as traveling salesman. In February, 1882, he came to Washington, Daviess County, and purchased an interest in the Gazette, assuming the position of editor and manager, and has since performed the duties of these positions in an able and satisfactory manner. Mr. Myers is a stanch Republican, and his paper is devoted to the interests of that party, advocating its principles in an able and fearless manner. He was married, December 28, 1882, to Miss Ella Elliot, a native of Knox County, Ind. Mr. Myers is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He is of German descent on his father's side, and of English and German on his mother's side.

JOHN T. NEAL, of the firm of Neal & Eskridge, dry goods and grocery merchants, of Washington, Ind., was born in Lawrence County, Ill., April 2, 1857, and is a son of Francis and Lucinda M. (Staugner) Neal, natives of Missouri and Kentucky, respectively. John T. was raised in his native county until he was nine years old, when his father was killed in the war of the Rebellion. He then moved with his mother to Grayson County, Ky., and remained there until his mother's death in 1869. He was then adopted by Julius N. Eskridge, a citizen of Grayson County, Ky., and secured a good education in the common schools. He clerked in the mercantile business for his guardian for three years, and then clerked for other firms until 1880, when he engaged in the grocery business for himself in Caneyville, Ky., continuing there until the summer of 1882, when he removed to this city and engaged in his present business, with S. C. Eskridge as partner. They have met with well deserved success, and carry a full and select line of goods. October 14, 1880, Mr. Neal was united in matrimony to Fannie M. Eskridge, a daughter of Elijah R. Eskridge, of this city. They have one child, a daughter, named Sadie L. Mr. Neal is a Democrat, and a member of the K. of P., and a successful and enterprising young business man of this city.

JOSIAH C. PALMER, a very prominent farmer of Daviess County, Ind., is the eldest of Andrew C. and Margaret (Ennis) Palmer's children. Our subject's grandfather, Richard Palmer, was one of the three men who first settled in the forks of White River. He came from South Carolina, and settled about two. miles west of Washington, on the State road. He was the first sheriff of Daviess County. The father was reared on a farm, and followed the occupation of farming for himself about six years, when he moved to Maysville, and was nine years at work building a water-mill, the first in the county. This mill ground grain for five counties for a number of years. He was very prosperous financially, and was a Democrat in his political views. He died in June, 1855. The mother, also a native of the county, survived him until August, 1869. The immediate subject of this sketch was born December 18, 1830. He was reared by his parents until nineteen years of age, and secured a limited education. At that age he took a western trip, traveling to California, where he was engaged in mining about two years. He then returned home and purchased his present farm, where he has continued very successfully ever since. He owns over 800 acres of very fine and well-improved land, nearly all under cultivation, also an elegant two-story residence. May 18, 1852, he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Ann Williman, born in Ohio in 1836, and coming to Indiana when but one year old. She is a daughter of Hiram and Margery (Crawford) Williman, pioneers of the county. They became the parents of fourteen children; two died in infancy, and one at the age of fourteen years. Those living are Laura A., Andrew C., Hiram L., Elizabeth A., Glenn D., Charles M., William H., Mary M., Walter F., Franklin and Seth. Since 1860 Mr. Palmer has been a Republican; previous to that time a Democrat. He is a good citizen, and one who has the respect of all. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

ABRAHAM PERKINS, farmer, was born in Daviess County,. Ind., August 31, 1842, and was the seventh of ten children born to Alfred and Rebecca (Ellison) Perkins, who were born in the " Blue-grass State," and came to Indiana during its very early settlement. Here they married and lived the remainder of their lives, following the independent lives of farmers. They became quite well to do, and were influential citizens of the county. Our subject had limited educational advantages, and at the age of fourteen began working about as a farm hand. July 3, 1861„ when he was nearly nineteen years old, he enlisted in Company I, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, and was mustered out in October, 1864. He was slightly wounded in each arm, but was never off duty a day while in the service.. After his return from the army he began farming in Knox County, continuing until 1869, when he purchased the land he now lives upon (120 acres). August 9, 1866, he was united in marriage to Amanda McDonald, born in the county March 6, 1844, daughter of Francis and Asenath McDonald, early settlers of the county. The wife is a member of the Christian Church, and Mr. Perkins is a warm Republican in politics, and is one of the successful and enterprising farmers of the county.

NATHAN G. READ, a well-known citizen of Daviess County, was born in this county March 30, 1842, and is the youngest of a family of three sons and four daughters born to Nathan and Martha (Weaver) Read, natives, respectively, of Massachusetts and Pennsylvania. The former came to Daviess County at an early day, and led a long, useful, and honorable life upon his farm to the time of his death in March, 1859. The latter died in 1848. The subject of this sketch was reared on his father's farm, and secured an ordinary education. At the age of twenty-one he accepted the position of deputy county auditor under his brother, Richard N., serving in that capacity until November, 1867, when he was elected to the position of auditor, and served two terms. In 1876 he was elected sheriff of the county, and served one term of two years. After retiring from the office of sheriff he was engaged for three years in the general merchandising business in Washington. Mr Read is an unswerving Democrat in politics, and has always been true to the interests of his party, as his repeated election to office shows. In October, 1884, he accepted the position of deputy treasurer of Daviess County under Richard H. Greenwood, and has almost entire charge of the office. He is a member of the city school board, and is generally recognized as one ©f the most enterprising citizens of the county. He was married, January 21, 1878, to Mrs. Fannie McCullough, by whom he has two sons: Robert Nathan and Lewis I. Read.

J. H. RIGHT was born in Daviess County February 6, 1820, and is one of four children born to James C. and Sarah (Hawkins) Right. His father was born in South Carolina, and immigrated to Indiana in 1809 and the mother several years later. They settled in Daviess County, where the subject of this sketch now lives, and were among the very early settlers, and were obliged to protect themselves from the Indians by taking refuge in forts. When our subject was twenty-three years of age his father died, and he then resided with his mother until twenty-seven years old. April 28, 1846, he was married to Caroline Walker, daughter of George and Catherine Walker, natives of Kentucky. Mr Right rented ground until 1858, when he settled on his present farm. To them were born these children: James F., G. W., John W., Thomas E., Francis B., Mary E., A. E., Carrie and Ella. Five are deceased. Mr. Right has always been a farmer and now owns eighty-three acres of land. He and wife have been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church for thirty-one years. He is a Republican and cast his first vote for Buchanan. He is self-educated and is an excellent citizen of the county.

JOHN A. RODARMEL; of Washington, Daviess County, was born in Washington, December 2, 1848, being one of a family of seven children born to Samuel A. and Lucinda (Ball) Rodarmel, natives, respectively, of Pennsylvania and Ohio. Samuel A. Rodarmel was born June 10, 1810, and was married to Miss Lucinda Ball February 22, 1832. Miss Ball was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, February 22, 1812. The former was of German parentage, the latter of Scotch. Samuel A. Rodarmel came to Daviess County in 1825 or 1826 from Pennsylvania, locating in Washington Township with his father, John Rodarmel. After his marriage he removed to Washington and engaged in the cabinet-making and undertaking business, which he continued until 1863, when he was appointed postmaster of Washington. This position he retained until his death from small-pox April 14, 1864. The subject of this sketch was brought up in Washington with his parents and secured a limited education. At the age of ten he began learning the printer's trade with S. F. Horrall, of Washington, in the old Telegraph office. He mastered his trade in that office and in those of other local papers, and also in the office of the Evansville Journal. In 1865 he accepted a position with the Gazelle and in 1868 bought an interest in the paper, which he held until 1870, when he sold out, still however, remaining with the paper. In 1882 he purchased an interest in the paper, which he still retains, and has charge of the composing-room and job 50 room of the company. In politics Mr. Rodarmel is a Republican, and is a member of the Encampment of the I. 0. R. M. He was married, in 1875, to Miss Frances Meredith, daughter of Squire B. T. Meredith, by whom he has five children—three sons and two daughters.

FRANCIS RUGGLESS is the eldest of seven children born to Jacob Ruggless, who was born in Kentucky in 1803, and of Welsh parentage. The mother was also born in Kentucky. They moved to Indiana in 1811 and were among the very early settlers of that unbroken country. Our subject was born February 1, 1824, and was reared on the place where he was born. He secured such education as could then be obtained, and at the age of eighteen began working for himself at milling at the old Palmer Mill, he having helped build the same in 1844. He continued' in the milling business thirty-four years. September 12, 1847, he was united in matrimony to Miss A. Martin, daughter of A. and Nancy Martin. To them were born these children: Nancy, Jacob, Elizabeth, Sarah and Clay. All are deceased except Nancy and Jacob. Mrs. Ruggless died December 1, 1854, and February 3, 1859, he was married to Nancy J. Fraim, daughter of George and Nancy (Haskins) Fraim. To them were born these children: Alice, Eva, Henrietta (are deceased), John M., James L., Francis, William D., Nathan, Laura, Edith. In 1881 Mr. Ruggless removed to the farm where he now lives. In January, 1865, he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Forty-third Indiana Volunteers, and served nine months. He was discharged at Nashville and mustered out at Indianapolis. He is a Republican and cast his first vote for Harrison. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOHN A. SCUDDER, M. D., Washington, Ind., was born in Daviess County November 1, 1832, and is the eldest of a family of five children born to Jacob F. and Matilda (Arrell) Scudder, natives, respectively, of New Jersey and Pennsylvania. His father came to Daviess County with his father, John A. Scudder, in 1819. The latter named was a physician and surgeon in the Revolutionary war, and was among the first of any note to follow the profession in Daviess County. Jacob F. Scudder was raised in this county, and was engaged in farming and in flat-boating to New Orleans at an early day. He was one of the enterprising and successful farmers of his time, was a Whig in politics, and died on his farm in Veal Township, May 31, 1844. His widow subsequently married William F. Wood, and they both still live in the county. The subject of this sketch was brought up on the farm, and secured the same kind of education obtained by other young men of that day. At the age of twenty-two he began the study of medicine with Dr. S. W. Peck, now a practicing physician of Washington, attended lectures, and graduated at the Miami Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1857. He then returned to Washington and began here the practice of medicine, which he has ever since continued with more than ordinary success. He served as surgeon in the Sixty-fifth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry two years during the war of the Rebellion. In politics he is a Republican, is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., of the K. of H. and of the G. A. R. Dr. Scudder was married, in 1859, to Helen S.Van Trees, daughter of Col. John Van Trees, by whom he has had seven children, five of whom are still living, as follows: Charles P., a practicing physician; Tillie F., Laura G., Anna and David.

WILLIAM SHANKS, ex-county surveyor and farmer, is a native of Fayette County, Penn., born June 29, 1827, son of John and Sarah (Jordan) Shanks, and is of German-Irish extraction. Of four children, he is the third. His father was born in north Pennsylvania in 1801, and the mother in 1802, in the same State. His grandfather was William Shanks, also a Pennsylvanian, and died in his native State in 1842 The father of our subject came to Daviess County in 1837, and entered 160 acres of land. He also followed the tanner's trade. He returned to Pennsylvania in 1838, and there remained until 1846, when he removed with his family to Daviess County, Ind., and settled in Washington Township, and here died in the fall of 1852. The mother of our subject died in 1883. Our subject remained at home and worked for his father until he was twenty-three years of age, when he taught school three terms. In 1849 he was appointed deputy surveyor, and served two years. In 1852 he went to California and engaged in mining, but returned in the spring of 1856 and began farming. In 1858 he settled where he now lives. He owns 326 acres of land, of which 226 acres are in a fine state of cultivation. In 1868 he was elected county surveyor of Daviess County, and re-elected in 1872. He was married, in 1857, to Miss Catherine Graham, a native of Pike County, Ind., born October 31, 1827, daughter of John and Ann M. Graham. Her father was born in Scotland in 1779, and her mother in Maryland in 1801. They haVe three children: Anna M. and Sarah E. (twins),born February, 1861, and John G., born 1862. Mr. Shanks is a Republican, and owns one of the best farms in Washington Township.

FRANKLIN SMEAD is a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was born December 18, 1832. His parents were Wesley and Cornelia Smead. The father was born in Whitehall, New York State, and was reared there and in Poughkeepsie. He was born in 1800, and at the age of eighteen went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and engaged in the drug business, accumulating wealth rapidly, and eventually became one of the prominent men of the city, and a wealthy banker. In 1857 the bank suspended, and he went back to Poughkeepsie, and at one time was worth. $500,000, but lost nearly all his property in 1857. The mother was born in Connecticut, and in early life went to Cincinnati, Ohio. She died in 1838, and the father in 1871. Our subject was reared in Cincinnati, Ohio, and received. a good. education, both mercantile and classicaL After attaining his majority he began farming in Illinois, and continued. in that State until 1872, when he moved onto his present farm. He devotes the most of his time to the culture of bees and fruits, .and the rearing of cattle. He owns 120 acres of exceptionally fine land. near Washington, on which is erected a fine two-story residence. In 1864 he was married to Sarah E. Sneath, a native of New Jersey, who immigrated to Illinois before the war. To them were born eleven children, two of whom died in infancy: Stella, Ida M., Minnie, Pearl, Llewellyn, Clarence, Harry, Daniel and Mabel. Those deceased were Alexander and Edith. Mr. Smead has always been a Republican, and is a prominent farmer. Mrs. Smead is a member of the church.

HORACE A. SMITH is the second of a family of five children born to Thomas and Laura (McJunkin) Smith. The father was born in Daviess County, Ind., July 13, 1825, and spent the most of his life in agricultural pursuits. He died in 1863. The mother was born February 4, 1832, and died April 14, 1860. Horace A. was born November 9, 1853. His mother died when he was but seven years of age, and his father kept house until 1863, when he too died, and our subject then made his home with an uncle, with whom he remained until eighteen years of age. When twenty-one years old he began farming on rented land, but by economy and industry he now owns 120 acres of well-improved and fine farming land, with good residence and barns. March 13, 1879, he took for his companion through life Miss Laura McCleskey, born in Daviess County March 10, 1859. Three children have blessed their union: Mary M., born December 25, 1879; Caroline, born October 4, 1881, and Ira T., born March 2, 1884. Mrs. Smith is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. and our subject is a Republican politically. He is one of the wide-awake men of the county, and takes an active interest in all enterprises for the public good.

DAVID SOLOMAN, commonly known as " Uncle," was born twelve miles from Bean's Station (which was a trading post during the war of the Revolution), near the Holston River, in Granger County, Tenn., April 3, 1809, son of Henry and Mary Soloman, whose maiden name was Brown, and is of German-English descent. He is the fifth in a family of six children. His father was born in Culpeper County, Va., in 1773, and his mother in South Carolina in 1778. In 1820 the Soloman family came to Indiana, and settled in Jackson County, and there remained two years, then removed to Orange County, where they remained three years, and then removed to Spencer County, Ky., and lived near Taylorsville, the county seat, until 1832, when, on the 5th of March, they arrived in this county, and settled on a farm four miles southeast of Washington. By occupation the father of Uncle David was a farmer and shoe-maker, and was also a soldier in the war of 1812. He remained in Daviess County about fifteen years, and then removed to Wisconsin, where he died about 1858. The mother also died in that State in 1853. Mr.Soloman lived with his parents until he arrived at manhood's years, and then learned the wagon-maker's trade, at which he is very skillful, and has since continued in that business. He has been a resident of this county fifty:three years. Mr. Soloman was married, in 1832, to Miss Sarah Carnahan, by whom he had seven children, one of whom survives, viz. : John. Mrs. Soloman died in 1843, and Mr. Solomln was married again the same year to Miss Elizabeth Logan. To this marriage were born two children—one still lives, viz. : Samuel D. Mrs. Soloman died February 27, 1881, and Mr. Soloman was married the same year to Mrs. Sophia J. Sumpter, a native of Dayton, Ohio, born in 1830, daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth Wood. Her father was boil] in Connecticut in 1805, and her mother in South Carolina in 1800. Mrs. Soloman was first married, in 1851, to Hudson Burrows, a native of Louisville, Ky. He was a Mexican soldier, and died at Leavenworth, Kas., in 1858. She was again married, in 1862, to Dr. W. H. Sumpter, a native of Kentucky, born in 1838, and died in 1876. She married her present husband in 1881. Mr. Soloman was formerly a Whig, and is now a Republican. He had two sons in the late war. In 1841 he joined the Christian Church, of which he was a member seventeen years, and then united with the Presbyterian Church. He was elected county commissioner in 1860, and served three years. Subsequently he was elected trustee of Washington Township, and served one year. Physically he yet seems in the prime of life, and " though he is passing into the sere and yellow leaf, his years sit lightly upon him." He is a man with many friends, few enemies, and in whom every one has the most implicit confidence. His word is as good as his note. The history of Daviess County would be incomplete without the sketch of this eminent Christian gentleman.

JOHN V. SPALDING, superintendent of the Poor Asylum of Daviess County, Ind., was born in Martin County, Ind., October 13, 1836. He was the eldest of a family of six children born to Hillary and Mary (Strange) Spalding, who were natives- of Washington County, Ky. They were married in Daviess County, Ind., and lived two years in Martin County, when they returned to Daviess County, and are yet residing there. The father and mother were born about 1816 and 1814, respectively. John V. was reared on his father's farm, and secured such education as could be obtained in the subscription schools of early times. He remained with his parents until twenty-three years of age, when he married and located in his native township, where he continued farming eight years. He then took charge of the County Poor Asylum, and had control of it for eight years. He then returned to the farm, where he remained two years. He was again urged to take the superintendency of the asylum, and has now had control of it for about seven years. He has been very successful, and the farm is in excellent condition, and is self-supporting in keeping up all the expense of paupers and salaries of men. November 13, 1859, he was united in marriage to Mary E. Mc A.tee, a native of this county, whose parents moved from Kentucky to Daviess County, Ind. To their union eight children have been born, seven now living: James L. (now employed on the farm), Julia A.. Martha A., Amanda L., William A., John F. and Leo. The family are members of the Catholic Church, and Mr. Spalding is a member of the Democratic party.

JOHN H. SPENCER, attorney at law and deputy prosecuting attorney of the Forty-ninth Judicial District, of Washington, Ind., was born at Greenville, Tenn., December 28, 1860, and is a son of William M. and Elizabeth (Jones) Spencer, both natives of North Carolina. They came with their children to Indiana in 1865 or 1866, locating at Rushville. Two years later they moved to Washington, where the subject of this sketch was raised and where he secured a liberal education in the public schools, and graduated from the high school in 1880. At the age of nineteen he began reading law with J. W. Ogdon, continuing a student in Mr. Ogdon's office until 1881, when he was admitted to the Daviess County bar. He then formed a law partnership with William H. Myers, and continued to practice with him until his removal from the city, since which time he has practiced alone with encouraging success. Mr. Spencer is a Democrat, and has taken an active part in the political affairs of his county and district. He has been a candidate for nomination to the State Legislature, but withdrew in favor of a friend before the meeting of the convention. In the spring of 1885 he was appointed deputy prosecutor for this district, under Hiram McCormick, the duties of which office he is now performing in a faithful and efficient manner. He was clerk of the judiciary committee in the House of Representatives during regular and special sessions of Legislature in 1885, and he takes an active part in local campaigns by stumping the county as chairman of executive committee, or in any way called upon to act.

HON. SAMUEL H. TAYLOR, citizen of Washington and attorney at law, was born January 25, 1837, in Cumberland, Md., where he was reared and educated. Here, too, he read law and entered upon the practice of his profession, but soon after was appointed postmaster, by President Buchanan, of his native city, serving as such during that administration. In 1864 Mr. Taylor moved to Washington, Ind., and has successfully practiced his profession ever since. He was one of the organizers of the Washington National Bank in 1872, and of which he was vice-president, cashier and director. He was twice elected district attorney, and in 1872 was elected prosecuting attorney of the Vincennes Circuit. He has thrice been chosen as delegate to Democratic National Conventions, viz.: Baltimore in 1872, when Horace Greeley was nominated; in 1876 when Samuel J. Tilden was the nominee, and at Chicago in 1884, when Grover Cleveland was the chosen leader and victor in the memorable campaign of that year. In 1878 he was elected representative of Daviess County, after one of the hottest contests ever made in the county, and was again elected representative in 1884, and Was chairman of the committee on judiciary, and was also on many other important committees. Mr. Taylor is a recognized leader of his party in his section of the State, and, although a strict partisan, is liberal in his views, and a stanch defender of the rights of the people. He is dignified in his bearing, courteous in manner, agreeable as a friend, and forcible and earnest as a speaker. He married Miss Josette E. Johnson. in his native city of Cumberland., Md., and has six children: Edith, the wife of Thomas F. Candler, of Waco, Tex. ; Ella B., wife of Thomas H. Walker, of Cincinnati, Ohio; Fred H., Norwood, Alice and Josette Taylor. Mr. Taylor has always been a friend of education, and for many years was one of the school board of Washington. He is now national bank examiner for the State of Indiana, having been appointed by Mr. Manning, Secretary of the Treasury, in June, 1885.

ELI THOMAS, a prominent citizen of Washington, Ind., is a native of the county, born August 20, 1826, and is one of a family of two sons and four daughters born to the marriage of Grandison and Mary (Hughes) Thomas. The father was a Virginian by birth. He was raised in that State, where he married his first wife, and came to Daviess County, Ind., in 1820, locating cm a farm near Washington, where his wife died. He then married our subject's mother. Their deaths occurred within seven days of each other, in 1863. The father was eighty-one years of age and the mother seventy-one. Eli was raised on a farm with his parents, and secured a limited education, such as could be obtained by a few months' attendance each year in the primitive log schoolhouse of his boyhood days. In 1859 he married Winifred Rott and purchased a farm adjoining the homestead, where he followed farming successfully until 1869, when he removed to this city and engaged in the general merchandise business six and one-half years. He then purchased a one-half interest in William Buck's livery stable, and at the end of two years purchased the entire stock and conducted the business alone until 1883. He then bought his present stable, and commands the leading livery business in the city. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas became the parents of one child, which died in infancy. He is an Independent in politics, though formerly a Republican. He is a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.


ANDERSON VEALE, farmer, was born in Veal Township March 8, 1831, son of James C. and Eleanor (Aikman) Veale, and is of German-English descent. He is the eighth in a family of nine children. His father was born in South Carolina and his mother in Pennsylvania. They came to what is now Indiana in 1807 and settled in what is now known as Veal Township, and here his father died. His mother died in Kansas. His Grandfather Veale built the first mill on Veal Creek and in Veal Township, and in honor of whom this township was named. Our subject settled where he now lives in 1864. He hag 117 acres of well-improved land and one of the finest farms in the county.. He was married, December, 1856, to Miss May J. Allen, born in Washington Township in 1835, daughter of Moses and Catharine Allen. They have four children living, viz.: Lydia, James C.,Denie and John A. He is a Republican and for eighteen years has been a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He is a representative of one of the first families of the county. His grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier.

GEORGE A. WALLER, SR., of the firm Waller & Prentiss, dealers in saddlery, harness, buggies, wagons, etc., etc., is a native of Daviess County, Ind., where he was born December 13, 1828, and is one of two surviving members of a family of nine children born to George A. and Katherine (McDonald) Waller, who were born in Kentucky, the father in 1793. He came to Indiana about 1816. Here he married and settled near Washington. He was a farmer until about 1851 or 1852, when he removed to this city, where he died. in 1867. He was originally an old time Whig in politics, and was sheriff of the county when that officer collected United States revenues. He was assessor of the entire county and was census enumerator previous to his removal to Washington. He clerked in the mercantile business as clerk and bookkeeper of Elisha Hyatt. He was also in the same business with Col. John Van Trees and afterward by himself until he became involved. by security debts, when he returned to the farm, and was also justice of the peace a number of years previous to his death. He was well and favorably known throughout the county and died in the Christian faith. Our subject was raised on a farm and at the age of twenty-one began learning the carpenter's trade, which he mastered and followed successfully until 1869, when his health failed him and he engaged in the saddlery and harness business with George T. Barr, who afterward. sold out and Henry S. Prentiss became a partner in the business. They do an excellent and extensive business in their line, and command a large trade in town and county. January 2, 1855, Mr. Waller married Mary Aikman, born in the county, and daughter of Hugh and Ada Aikman. To them were born six sons, four now living: Francis A., James E., Archie A. and Charles H. Mr. Waller is a stanch RepUblican and a warm advocate for the principles of his party. He is a member of the Encampment of I. 0. 0. F. His wife died November 16, 1867, and he has since remained unmarried.

THOMAS WILSON, Sr., was born in Manchester, England, January 20, 1819, and is a son of John and Sarah (Glover). Wilson. They were both natives of England, but the mother was of Welsh parentage. The father was a miner and our subject was reared near the mines. His early educational advantages were very imperfect, but since attaining his majority he has improved his education very much. His mother died when he was very young and he remained with his father to the age of twenty. His father died about this time and Thomas came to America about 1855 and worked in mines in Pennsylvania for about three years. He came to Washington in the fall of 1857 and in connection with other parties opened a mine, which soon became exhausted. He then became connected with Cabel Sr Kauffman and the firm took the name of Cabel, Wilson Sr Co., doing a very extensive business. Mr. Wilson and a friend were instrumental in introducing coal burning on the Ohio Sr Mississippi Railroad He remained a partner of Messrs. Cabel Sr Co. until November 7, 1885, when he retired from the firm and now has an interest in the Cannelburg mines. He was married about 1839 to Mary Wrigley, born in Manchester, England, in 1818. To them were born eight children, six now living: William, Sarah, Elizabeth, John, Thomas, James, Harriet and Joseph. Mr. Wilson is a Republican and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.


THOMAS WILSON, JR., is the son of Thomas and Mary Wilson (see sketch), and was born January 4, 1849, near Manchester, England. He came with his parents to America and remained two years in Pennsylvania, and then came to Daviess County, Ind., where he was reared to manhood and has lived ever since. He secured a graded school education, and at the age of twenty-nine married, and has ever since lived in this city. He has been superintendent and boss of his father's mines, and was State Mine Inspector for four years ending January 1, 1885. He is now superintendent of the Wilson Coal Company's mines, of Montgomery, in which he has an interest. He has been very successful as a business man, and is a member of the Masonic fraternity (Knight Templar). His political views are Democratic. October 8, 1879, he was married to Ida Clark, daughter of Lewis and Laura Clark, now of Daviess County. The father died during the late war, and the mother now lives with our subject. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are the parents of one child—Bessie B.—born June 19, 1882.

JOSEPH WILSON, book-keeper for the firm of Cabel, Wilson & Co., was born near Manchester, England, April 14, 1853, being the youngest of eight children, six of whom are now living, born to Thomas and Mary Wilson. In 1855 the subject of this sketch was brought to the United States by his parents, and in 1857 to Daviess County. Here he was brought up and given a good education. He completed a scientific course in the Union Christian College at Merom, Sullivan Co., Ind. From his eleventh to his nineteenth year he worked in the coal mines owned by the firm of which his father was a member, and after completing his educatiOn and returning home from college, at the age of twenty-four, he accepted the position of book-keeper for the firm of Cabel, Wilson & Co. He remained in this position until 1878,. when he was elected by the Republican party clerk of the Daviess County Circuit Court, and served faithfully in that office four years, when he returned to his old position of book-keeper. Mr. Wilson has always been a consistent and earnest Republican. He is a Mason, and has received the Knight Templar degree, and he is also a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He was married, June 1. 1876, to Miss Eunice Humphrey, a native of Ohio. They have two children: William H. and Mary Edna. Both Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are members of the Christian Church.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS is the first of three children born to Watson and Cynthia (Sinks) Williams. The father was born in Mason County, Ky., February 8, 1810, and the mother in Virginia in 1809. The paternal grandfather was a native of Kentucky: moved to Indiana in 1825. The mother's people came in 1809, and the grandfather of our subject participated in the war of 1812. The parents were married in 1835. Mr. Williams, the subject of this sketch, was reared on the farm where he was born, and secured a common school education. October 1, 1859, he was married to Tabith a Stephenson, daughter of Peter and Jane (Crabb) Stephenson, who were natives of the "Buckeye State." She was the seventh of eleven children, and was born May 31, 1840. They became the parents of these children: Thomas A., born in 1860; Sarah J., born in 1862; William G., born in 1864; Cynthia A., born in 1867; Ella M., born in 1870; Carrie B., born in 1873; John P., born in 1876, and Mattie M., born in 1878. Ella May died in August, 1875. Mr. Williams has always been a stanch Republican in his political views, and cast his first presidential vate for Abraham Lincoln, in 1860. He has never held any public office, and has never had his name before the public for patronage. He has been quite prosperous in his undertakings, and owns 200 acres of land, 140 of which. are under cultivation.

MARION WRIGHT, a well-to-do farmer of Daviess County, Ind., was born on the farm where he now lives September 17, 1853, and is the eldest of four living children born to Roderick R. and Anne (McJunkin) Wright, who are natives of this county. The father was born and reared near Washington, and was a skillful and prosperous farmer. He was born about 1823, and died October 3, 1868. The mother was born about 1830, and died August 30, 1884. Our subject spent his boyhood days on a farm and in attending the district schools, where he secured a common school education. He remained with his parents until their death, and then still continued to farm on the old place. In 1878 he was married to Lodena Taylor, daughter of Joseph M. Taylor, a farmer of the county. They have three children, viz.: Lucilla T., Mary C. and Josephine. Mr. Wright has been quite prosperous in his agricultural pursuits, and now owns 200 acres of very fine farming land, on which are erected good buildings. He is a very zealous Republican, and always has been, and ranks among the first, and one of the public-spirited men of the county. His wifie is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

FRANCIS ZINKANS was born near Washington, Daviess Co., Ind., and is the seventh of ten children born to Philip and Anna B. (Husfeld) Zinkans, born in Germany and died in this country in 1875 and 1884, at the age of seventy-two and seventy years respectively. Our subject was reared near Washington, and resided with his parents until twenty-one years of age, when he married Mary, daughter of John and Mary Corcoran. She was born November 8, 1845. After his marriage, which occurred November 21, 1864, Mr. Zinkans resumed farming, having previously purchased eighty acres of land in Harrison Township. He lived there about five years, and then traded his land for forty acres, a portion of his present farm of 260 acres. To him and his wife were born these children: Genevieve, born in 1865; Maggie, born in 1867; John, born in 1869; Thomas, born in 1871; Rosa, born in 1873; Catherine, born in 1875; Maurice (deceased), born in 1877; Nettie (deceased), born in 1880; Esther, born in 1882, and Austin, born in 1884. Mr. Zinkans cast his first vote for Gen. George B. MacClellan, and has always been a Democrat. In November, 1882, he was elected to the office of county commissioner, and held that office a term of three years; was re-elected in 1884, and is now serving in that capacity. He belongs to no secret society, is a Catholic, and has reared his children in that faith.


BARR TOWNSHIP.

MILTON L. ALLEN is a son of Hiram and Keziah (Cook) Allen, natives of North Carolina, the former born in 1788, and the latter in 1812. They came to this county in early life, when the father followed farming as an occupation, and eventually became one of the largest land holders in the community. He was at one time county commissioner, and at another represented Daviess County in the State Legislature. His death occurred in 1844. The mother still lives at the age of seventy-three. Milton L. was born in 1843, and at the age of sixteen began the battle of life for himself. When nearly seventeen years old he married Amanda Lytton, who was born in 1839, daughter of Hosea and Elizabeth (Patterson) Lytton. Mr. and Mrs. Allen became the parents of six children: Lucetta, Gordon, Mason A., Walter I., Florence and Susan. Mr. Allen was one of the "boys in blue," and served in Company B, Twenty-seventh Indiana Infantry, enlisting in 1861. He was in the battles of Winchester, South Mountain, Ball's Bluff, Cedar Mountain, Resaca, Antietam, and many lesser engagements. At the last-named battle he was severely wounded by a minie-ball, and for several weeks lay at the point of death. As a partial compensation he received a pension of $6 per month. He served for over three years, and after returning home gave his entire attention to farming, and now owns 141 acres of land. He is a member of the Christian Church, and was constable of Van Buren Township for two years.

ABRAM T. BANTA, one of the early settlers of Daviess County, Ind., is a son of Henry and Jane (Fulton) Banta, and was born in the county where he now resides in 1823. The parents were natives of Kentucky, the father born in 1786. The mother was an own cousin of Robert Fulton, the inventor of the steamboat. They came to Indiana in 1823 and located in Daviess County, where they purchased 160 acres of timber land. The father died in 1872, and the mother in 1833. Abram obtained his education in the subscription schools of early days, and when twenty-two years old began working for himself on rented farms. Ten years later he went in debt for the greater part of eighty acres of land. By hard work and good management he not only paid for this, but added eighty acres more, making a good farm of 160 acres, 120 of which are under cultivation. In 1845 he was married to Eliza A. Stephens, born in 1830, daughter of William and Elizabeth (McCracken) Stephens. To their union the following children were born: Elizabeth J.. William W., Susan D., Martha A., Glen D., Mary E., Henry D., Sarah E., Charley A. and Thomas S. Mr. Banta served nine months in the late war in Company F, Forty-fourth Indiana Infantry. He is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

WILLIAM BECKETT is a-son of Samuel and Mary (Thorn-ley) Beckett. The father, who was born in Virginia in 1789, came with his parents to Kentucky when an infant, and there grew to manhood. In 1818 he and family moved to Daviess County, Ind., where he afterward became the possessor of 700 acres of excellent farming land. His death occurred during the war. The mother was born in Kentucky and died in 1839. Our subject was born in Bourbon County, Ky., in 1817. After reaching his majority he began working for himself, and after laboring several months as a farm hand, began hauling goods from the river towns to Daviess County, Later he located on eighty acres of land given him by his father, which he has increased to 560 acres. In 1842 he wedded Mary A. Graves, born in 1825. They have these seven children: Charles T., James R., Angeline, William A., Robert, John E. and Eliza A. His wife, who was a member of the Catholic Church, died in 1876, and two years later he married Caroline Graves, who bore him_ two children: Mary J. and Matilda C. Mr. Beckett is a member of the Catholic Church, and a Democrat in politics.

ROBERT R. BELL, farmer, is a son of George and Margaret (Buchanan) Bell, who were natives of the Emerald Isle, born in. 1776 and 1783, respectively. They were married in 1802, and in 1812 bade adieu to home and native land and embarked for the United States. While they were en route they were captured by a British man-of-war, because found on an American vessel, and retained within British territory for three years. They then came to America and passed the remainder of their lives in New York. The father died in 1840 and the mother in 1866. Robert R. was born in New York in 1823, and after completing his common school education he took a course of instruction in a higher institution of learning For six years he taught school and followed the mercantile business, but becoming dissatisfied, he soon turned his attention to farming. Receiving some aid from his father he purchased a farm, and after making several changes .sold out and came to Daviess County, Ind., in 1868. In 1846 he married Sarah J. Seeber, born in New York in 1825. They have three children: Robert H., Sarah J. and Willis B. Mrs Bell died in 1863, and the same year he married Mary A. Gunn, born in 1823. Mr. Bell was one of the " boys in blue," and served in Company B, Tenth New York Artillery. Six months later he was discharged on account of sickness. He is a Republican and cast his first vote for Clay.

JOSEPH F. BRANDON, son of- Moses R. and Mahala (Gray) Brandon, was born in Switzerland County, Ind., in 1839. His father died when he was a small lad, and his mother married again. He was left to the care of his stepfather and was sent to school but very little. At the age of fourteen he ran away from home and worked at the blacksmith trade for about six years,when he left the man for whom he worked. In 1863 he enlisted in the Fourth Indiana Battery and was with Gen. Sherman during the entire service. After serving nearly two years he received an honorable discharge. He then blacksmithed in Howard County, Ind. Here he married Harriet Bunnell in 1866. She was born in 1847, and is a daughter of Ezra and Susan (Ellis) Bunnell. They have six children: Omar, Susan, Nelson, James, Alfred and Mary. They also raised a boy by the name of Alfred Ingalls, and when twenty-one years old started him in life with a good team of horses. Some time after his marriage Mr. Brandon lived about eight years in Kansas. In 1877 he came to Daviess County, where he owns a farm of 200 acres. His parents were natives of Kentucky. The father was a farmer. He died in 1848, and the mother in 1854.

JAMES T. BREWER is the eldest of nine children born to George and Anne (Carrico) Brewer, and was born in Marion County, Ky., in 1828. His educational advantages in boyhood were very limited, he attending the subscription schools only a few weeks during the year. He remained with his father until twenty-five years of age, when he married Rosellen O'Brien, born in 1833, daughter of John J. and Louisa (Montgomery) O'Brien. To Mr. and Mrs. Brewer were born these four children: Josephine, Christopher C., Rosellen and Francis. Mr. Brewer is a stanch Democrat, and cast his first vote for Franklin Pearce. As a farmer he has met with good success. He began life for himself with eighty acres of timber land, which he began to clear and on which he built his first log house in 1854, which forms part of his present residence. His farm now amounts to 140 acres. Mrs. Brewer died in 1863, and the following year he married Jane E. Walker, born in 1838, daughter of James and Belinda (Mattingly) Walker. To this marriage these four children were born: George, James, Albert and Louis. All the family are members of the Catholic Church.

GEORGE W. BREWER is a son of George and Anne (Carrico) Brewer. The father was born in Maryland, in 1802, and when a lad moved with his father to Kentucky, where he grew to manhood. In 1827 he married our subject's mother, who was born in Kentucky, in 1807. Three years later they came to Indiana, and located in Daviess County in 1831, where they spent the remainder of their lives in agricultural pursuits. The father died in 1867, and the mother in 1869. Subject was born in 1832. He attended the old-time subscription schools, and on reaching manhood his father gave him eighty acres of timber land, which he began to clear. By hard work and good management he has increased his farm to 140 acres, 100 acres being under cultivation. In 1857 he was married to Josephine L. Montgomery, born in 1827. She is a daughter of James and Julia (Howard) Mont s gomery. To them were born these children: Julia A., Joseph Mathew, Mary A. and Annie E. All the family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Brewer is a Democrat and has been very successful in his business enterprises.

GEORGE H. CARRICO is a son of George G. and Elizabeth (Cissell) Carrico, who were born in Kentucky and there grew to maturity, married, and lived till 1818, when they came to Daviess County, Ind., and there spent the remainder of their days in agricultural pursuits. The father died in 1858, and the mother in 1,845. George H. was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1827, and at the age of twenty-one he began to battle his own way in the world. After farming for about one year, he purchased 200 acres of land, mostly on credit, and soon paid for that and 170 acres more. In 1850 he was married to Elizabeth Burris, born in 1834. About one year after marriage she died, leaving one child —David. In 1859 Mr. Carrico was married to Mary A. Summers, born in 1841, daughter of Thomas and Susan E. (O'Brien) Summers. Mr. and Mrs. Carrico became the parents of these seventeen children: Sarah, Susan, Charles, Martha, Mary, George, Richard, William, Josephine, Anna A., John, James, Anna J., Vincent, Cecelia and infant twins. The family are Catholics and Mr. Carrico is a stanch Democrat.

MICHAEL CUNNINGHAM, the leading farmer of Barr Township, Daviess Co., Ind., is a native of the " Emerald Isle," where he was born in 1814 or 15. He is a son of B. and Margaret (Coyle) Cunningham. His mother died in 1820, leaving two children—him and a sister about two years younger than himself. His father died in 1830, and he and his sister lived for some time with their mother's brother. At the age of sixteen he began working for himself, receiving the munificent sum of $5 a year foi his services. By 1836 he and his sister had saved enough money to enable them to take passage for the United States. They embarked on the ship " Southerner," and landed in New York with less than $5 in money between them. They soon obtained work, and Mr. Cunningham began digging cellars, and by his faithfulness and energy won the respect and approbation of his employers. From New York he worked his way to Providence, R. I., and for several months worked for the railroad. He then returned to New York and carried the hod for 75 cents per day; but in a few weeks he and his sister embarked on board the ship " Havre " for Mobile, Ala., and reached that city when the yellow' fever was raging. He succeeded in obtaining employment, and in 1838 took a trip up the Mississippi, and going as far northward as Chicago. He then worked on the river at Louisville, Ky., for some time, and for about seven years worked on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. In 1840 he came to Daviess County, Ind., to visit friends, who prevailed upon him to invest some of his money in land. He purchased 160 acres of timber land, which he rented. He then returned to the river, but visited his farm every year and added improvements. In 1843 he moved on. his place, where he kept house for himself for some time. That same year he married Julianna Shircliff, born in 1826, daughter of John and Mary (Gough) Shircliff. Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham became the parents of these children: Mary, Patrick, Andrew, Aliza, Louis, Michael, John and Joseph. Michael is one of the rising young teachers of the county, and the rest of the boys are farmers. All the family are members of the Catholic Church, and Mr. Cunningham is a Democrat in politics, although he votes for the man rather than the party. He has been quite a successful business man and is one of the first taxpayers of the county.

MICHAEL DISSER was born in France in 1826, and is the son of Michael and Catherine (Ansteatt) Disser, who were born in the same province as our subject, in 1800 and 1808, respectively. In 1836 they embarked for the United States, coming via New Orleans to Evansville, Ind., and then by means of wagons. to Daviess County, settling among the dense woods of Harrison Township. Here his father devoted his time to blacksmithing and farming, owning at his death, in 1862, 160 acres of land. The mother died in 1879. In boyhood he learned to read. German and French, and after coming to this country attended the common schools, and later spent some time at Notre Dame. In 1850 he packed his belongings and went to California to dig gold. His outfit consisted of goods amounting to about $175. He reached his destination with only $10, the most of which he spent for a pick and pan. After remaining there about three years he returned home with a surplus of $5,000. In 1854 he purchased the farm of 160 acres where he now lives, and which he has since increased to 320 acres. In 1854 he was married to Mary Grinon, born about 1834 in the Emerald Isle. Their union was blessed. with eight children: Joseph M., Rose, Lizzie, James, John, Bridget, Mary and Patrick. Both husband and wife are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Disser is a stanch Democrat and cast his first vote for Cass. He has been a successful farmer, and is one of the men who has the interest and welfare of the county at heart.

WILLIAM L. EVANS, retired physician of Barr Township, Daviess Co., Ind., is a son of Harmon and Mary (Lamb) Evans. The father was born in Kentucky in 1803, and the mother in Ohio in 1807. They were married in Harrison County, Ind., in 1821, and there spent their lives. The father, who was a farmer, died in 1874, and the mother in 1848. William L. was born in Indiana in 1830, and after attending the common schools he was a student in the academy at New Albany, Ind., for some time. In 1851 he began the study of medicine under A. M. Jones, of Corydon, with whom he staid three years. Two years later he attended the medical college of Louisville, Ky., but a short time before graduation was compelled to go home on account of sickness. In 1854 be began practicing his profession in Mt. Pleasant, and six years later went to Loogootee, and then moved to Montgomery, where he continued to reside until 1876, when he retired to the farm of 220 acres on which he now lives, but is often called upon to do duty as a physician by his many friends. In 1858 he was married to Mary A. Logan, born in Ohio in 1834. They have three children: Eugene H., William L. and Logan W. Mrs. Evans died in 1868, and five years later Mr. Evans was married to Mary E. Hottell, born in 1845. They have three children: Walter A., John W. and Francis 0. Mr. Evans is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and his wife of the United Brethren Church.

JAMES H. FANNING, the leading merchant of Montgomery, Ind., is the son of Thomas and Bridget (O'Reilly) Fanning, born in the Emerald Isle in 1812 and 1809, respectively. The father was educated for the Catholic priesthood, but owing to defective eye-sight was rejected. His father not wishing him to come to America, he concluded to take French leave, and accordingly came to the United States without his parents' knowledge. He was married, and after living in various places finally settled in Daviess County, where he purchased 200 acres of land. He died in 1871. The mother is still living. James H. was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and after completing the course of the common schools, he attended the normal school at Washington, Ind., and followed the life of a teacher for five years. In 1876 he married Margaret Farrell, born in 1853, and died in 1877, leaving one child, John J. In 1878 Mr. Fanning took charge of a bankrupt store in Alfordsville, but soon after started another store of general merchandise in Montgomery with John Robinson as partner. Later he purchased the entire stock and has since carried on the business very successfully alone. He owns eighty acres of good land besides his house and lot and store room and stock in the village. He has held a number of offices in the township, and is a man ever ready to support worthy enterprises.

JOHN H. GRAVES was born in Barr Township, Daviess Co., Ind., in 1823, and received the education of the average farmer boy of his time. On reaching man's estate he paid his own way in school, thus acquiring a good education for that time. After raising a crop of corn and selling it he worked on the Ohio River on a flat-boat, but on returning he was taken very ill, and spent all his accumulated means to pay his physician. For three winters he cut cord-wood in the South for 50 cents a cord, and in time accumulated enough money to purchase forty acres of the farm on which he now lives. He now owns 400 acres of land and is well fixed financially. In 1849 he married Elizabeth Morgan, born in Daviess County in 1829. She is a daughter of Charles and Mary (Burris) Morgan, and has borne her husband these children: Valentine, Charles, Mary, Matilda, Jame, William, Rebecca, Jennie, Gertrude, Catharine, Julia and John H. Charles was a teacher by profession for about four years. All the family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Graves is a warm Democrat, and cast his first vote for Polk. His enterprises have met with abundant success and he may be mentioned as one of the prominent men of the township in which he lives. His parents, John and Mary Graves, were born in Kentucky in 1793 and 1790, and died in Indiana in 1865 and 1866, respectively.

JOSIAH C. HARRIS, miller, of Montgomery, Ind., is the son of James and Nancy (Johnson) Harris, natives of Kentucky and Tennessee, respectively. They were married in Kentucky in 1818, and a year later moved to Indiana, locating on a farm in Sullivan County. The father's - death occurred in 1854, and the mother's in 1842. Josiah was born in Sullivan County, in 1826. He had poor educational advantages, owing to the scarcity of schools and the demand for his services at home. At the age of seventeen he began doing for himself, working in flouring-mills in this and several other States, thereby obtaining a thorough knowledge of the trade. About 1850 he purchased a mill in his native county, operating it for two years, and then began saw-milling in connection. In 1876 he began erecting his present large five-story mill, and in 1884 put in the necessary machinery for the roller process. The mill turns off about thirty-five barrels of flour per day, and was erected at a cost of about $30,000. Besides this property he owns 440 acres of land in his native county. Mr. Harris has been married three times. His first wife, Leanna Riggs, born in 1835 and died in 1865, bore him seven children: Martin L., Julia A., Mary P., William W., Davis J., Clement L. and one unnamed. In 1866 he married Mary K Beard, born in 1840. To them were born three children: James B., Ernest C. and Florence J. This wife died in 1878, and for his third wife he took Mary J. (Feagan) Beckett, who bore him one child, Helen L. For six years Mr. Harris filled the position of township trustee with ability, and to the satisfaction of the people.

GEORGE T. HAYS, one of the first settlers of Barr Township, Daviess Co., Ind., was born in Maryland, in 1809; son of George and Terresa (Langley) Hays, natives of the same State as our subject. In 1814 they moved to Kentucky, and three years later came to Indiana, locating in Daviess County. After suffering many of the privations incident to pioneer life, they enjoyed a good degree of prosperity, and owned about 600 acres of land at the father's death, which occurred about 1858. When the stage coach began to run between New Albany and Vincennes he was one of the first to build a stage stand. His death occurred while in Texas looking for a large body of land to purchase for his sons. The mother died in 1861. The sum total of George T.'s schooling was about six months. When twenty years old he began working on the canal at Ohio Falls, and later helped saw the lumber for three flat-boats, load them, and take them to New Orleans. Later he began working for a man for $8 per month. His first real estate was forty acres of timber land, which he afterward increased to 640 acres. In 1830 he married Mary A. McClelland, born in 1812, in Kentucky. To them were born these children: William, Terresa, John, George, Sarah, Louisa, Martha, Mary, Laura, Thomas and James. In 1874 Mrs Hays died. Mr Hays is an enterprising citizen of the county and is well fixed financially. His son, Thomas J., was born in 1851. He obtained a good education and was married, in 1877, to Emily Morgan, born in 1853. They have three children: George T., James E. and John. They live on the old homestead and have sole charge of it.

JOHN H. HAYS was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1833, and is the eldest son of GeOrge T. and Mary (McClelland) Hays (mention of whom is made in this work). John H. attended the old time subscription schools, and at the age of twenty began earning his own living, and worked for some time in the pineries of Wisconsin. After his return he engaged in the fur trade during the winter, and followed agriculture during the summer. His first purchase of land was thirty acres, which he has since increased, acre by acre, until he now owns 265 acres—nearly all under cultivation. Besides farming he also engages in shipping cattle, sheep and hogs. He has been very successful in all his enterprises, and the secret of his success lies in the fact that he was industrious and prudent, and misfortunes and losses only,made him the more determined to succeed. In 1862 he was married to Phoebe Brown, born in 1846, daughter of Whitard and Mary A. (Colbert) Brown. To Mr. and Mrs. Hays nine children were born: Fannie, Noah, Vitury, Mary E., Charles and Jerry, and three unnamed. Mrs. Hays is a member of the Christian Church, and Mr. Hays is a stanch Republican and cast his first vote for Fremont.

ORION B. HIXON, hotel proprietor, of Montgomery, Ind., is a son of James P. and Laura A. (Beckett) Hixon, born in Daviess County in 1833 and 1837. They were married in 1856, and settled on a farm in Harrison Township, where the father purchased his first land (forty acres) on credit, and paid for it by hauling bridge timbers for the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad. He now owns 220 acres of land on which he and wife are yet living. Subject is a native of the county where he now resides; born in 1857. He obtained a good practical education in the district schools, and afterward attended a term at the normal school, at Washington. When twenty-two years old he began farming on eighty acres of land given him by his father. Four years later he sold the place and entered the mail service. On account of failing health he soon abandoned this business and purchased an interest in the drug store known as Willeford &- Hixon. In May, of the same year, he became sole proprietor of the business. In 1879 he was united in matrimony to Lillie McCarty, born in 1861, daughter of Eli and Louisa (Allen) Mc-- Carty. The father was a Union soldier, but, being wounded at Perryville, he returned home and accepted the position of enrolling officer of Reeve Township, a position which others feared to fill. While on duty he was killed, and his body sunk in the White River by a body of men banded together to resist the draft, known as "Peace Democrats," but in reality rebels. To Mr. and Mrs. Hixon two children were born: Edith M. and Helen C. Mr. Hixon is a leading Republican and cast his first vote for Garfield. He takes an active interest in all enterprises tending to the common good, and is one of the prominent young business men of the town.

EZEKIEL HOPKINS was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1823. He received very poor educational advantages, owing to the undeveloped condition of the schools at that time. At the age of seventeen he took charge of his father's farm of 240 acres, and cared for his parents until their death. He then inherited the old homestead, about 180 acres of which are under cultivation. In 1853 he was married to Martha Hollingsworth, born in Daviess County in 1834, daughter of Samuel and Louisa (Lett) Hollingsworth. Mr. and Mrs Hopkins became the parents of ten children: Louisa, Mary 0., Samuel L., George E., Joseph H., Edna J., Eli F., Albert, Zelek and Laura (deceased). Both husband and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Hopkins is a stanch Republican and cast his first vote for Taylor. He has been a successful farmer, and is much respected as a neighbor and citizen. His parents were Esek and Mary (Aikman) Hopkins, born in Maryland and Pennsylvania in 1777 and 1779, respectively. They were married in Kentucky, in 1802, and in 1818 came to Daviess County, Ind., locating on the farm where Ezekiel now lives. The father died in 1859, and the mother in 1856.

PATRICK HOPKINS is a son of John and Julia (Skelly) Hopkins, who were born, raised and lived in Ireland, where the father farmed. Subject was born in Ireland, and when a mere boy came to the United States and began working in Philadelphia as lackey boy in a boarding house. Soon after he went to Maryland and carried the "grog kettle " for the men who worked on public works for about a year, and later drove a team for the same length of time. He removed to Ohio, where he worked at different occupations, and finally rose to salesman in a supply store on the canal. From there he went to Louisville, Ky., where he operated a steam engine slaughter house. Having purchased eighty acres of land in Daviess County, Ind., he came West and began to clear and make his land tillable. His farm now amounts to 172 acres, and is in good condition. In 1852 he married Catharine Riley, who died about two years later, leaving one child, Julia A. In about four months he took for his second wife Elizabeth M. Raney, who bore him fifteen children: John, Mary, Phoebe, Thomas Elizabeth, James, Edward, Henry, Maggie, Catherine, Francs, Julian, Peter, Rosa, and one who died. The family are Catholics. Mr. Hopkins is a strong Democrat,and cast his first vote for Polk. The children are working at various callings, and are doing well for themselves.

WILLIAM H. KENDALL is a son of John R. and Nancy (Ellis) Kendall, who were born in Kentucky in 1805 and 1809, respectively. They came to Indiana about 1817, and about 1825 were married. They acquired a considerable share of this world's goods, owning a 400 acre farm well stocked. Three of their sons and two grandsons were in the late war. His wife died in 1880, but he is yet living at the ripe old age of eighty years. William H. was born in Daviess County in 1830. At the age of seventeen he began working for himself at pork packing during the winter season, and farmed during the summer. For about eight years he worked in this way, and then turned his entire attention to farming. In 1883 he sold his farm and moved to Montgomery, and purchased the Kendall House, and kept hotel for over two years. On account of illness in the family he then retired to a private residence in the village. In 1852 he was married to Margaret Waller, born in Washington in 1832. They became the parents of ten children : Laura G., Mary, Sarah F., Margaret, Jennie B., William, Edward, John K., Joseph F. and one unnamed. At the breaking out of the war Mr. Kendall enlisted in Company H, Fifty-eighth Indiana Infantry, serving his country faithfully for nearly four years. He took an active part in the battles of Shiloh, Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge and others. At Chickamauga he was wounded severely five times, but so praiseworthy was his conduct at this battle that he was granted a thirty days furlough by Gen. Rosecrans as a recognition of his bravery. He served as sergeant for nearly a year, and was one of the pontoon corps who built the bridges for Sherman on his march to the sea. He returned home, and in 1870 was appointed assistant district marshal for taking the ninth census. In 1884 he was elected justice of the peace by a large majority, and has given satisfaction in every position that he has been called upon to fill.

WILLIAM KENNEDY is of Irish descent, born in Philadelphia in 1837. In boyhood he attended the common schools, and on reaching man's estate received instruction in graded schools. For ten years thereafter he followed the profession of teaching during the winter seasons and tilled the soil during the summer. In 1867 he was married to Mary A. Beckett, born in 1849, daughter of William and Mary (Graves) Beckett. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy these three children were born: Anna, Charles and Francis. Mrs. Kennedy died in 1874, and four years later Mr. Kennedy took for his second wife Ida M. Smith, born in 1857. To them were born these children: Alice, Cleophas, James, Frederick, John and Paul. The family are Catholics. For four years Mr. Kennedy held the position of county treasurer ; which office he filled with honesty and to the entire satisfaction of the people. He is a leading Democrat, and cast his first vote for Douglas. In 1866 his father presented him with eighty acres of land. Since then he has increased his farm to 330 acres, about 220 of which are cultivated. Mrs. Kennedy's parents are James H. and Nancy J. (Myers) Smith.

JAMES KENNEDY. James and Margaret (McNally) Kennedy, parents of our subject, were natives of Ireland. Both came to America early in life, and after marriage located in Pennsylvania. Some years later they came to Daviess County, Ind., and located on the farm where James now lives ; the father being quite a land-holder at his death in 1879. He was for some time justice of the peace. James Kennedy was born in Daviess County in 1847. As his services were very much needed at home he received a limited education. At the death of his father he and his brother took charge of the home farm, he having inherited 160 acres. In 1881 he was married to Hannah McGrath, born in La Fayette, Ind., in 1854. She is one of eleven children born to Dennis and Mary (Shannahan) McGrath. The father was a laborer on the railroad and his wife kept boarders. Later they purchased a farm, where the father died in 1867. To Mr and Mrs. Kennedy's marriage one child has been born, named Hilda. Both husband and wife are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Kennedy is a Democrat and a successful farmer.

JOHN MATTINGLY was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1826, and is a son of Henry and J. (Kidwell) Mattingly, the former born in 1804 and the latter in 1794, in Kentucky. They grew to maturity in their native State. After their marriage they came to Daviess County and followed the lives of farmers. Both parents died in 1871. John received a limited education, owing to the undeveloped condition of the schools at that time, and at the age of twenty-two began to make his own way in the world. After living on rented farms for about three years he purchased 145 acres of timber land, which he has since increased to 185 acres. In 1853 he was married to Mary A. Gootee, born in 1825, daughter of Silas and Barbara (Walker) Gootee. Her father was a native of Maryland and her mother of Kentucky. They were married in the mother's native State, and came to Indiana where the father farmed. Mr. and Mrs. Mattingly became the parents of five children: James M., Harriet A., Silas H., Albert S. and William A. The family are Catholics, and Mr. Mattingly is a Democrat and cast his first vote for Lewis Cass, of Michigan.

GEORGE McATEE is a son of Daniel McAtee, who was born in Kentucky in 1794. In 1818 he wedded our subject's mother, who was born in 1799. The day after their marriage they moved to Missouri, where they lived about eight years. They then came to Daviess County, Ind., where they spent the remainder of their days. The father was a farmer, and also worked at the millwright and carpenter's trade. He died in 1875 and the mother four years later. George was born in 1820 in Missouri. He attended the subscription schools, and after attaining his majority began to do for himself. In 1845 he led to the hymeneal altar Margaret Mattingly, born in 1821. She died in 1852, leaving these three children: Ann S., William E. and James L. Two years later Mr. McAtee married Martha M. Brewer, born in Kentucky in 1833. Her parents, James and Teressa L. (Sims) Brewer, were born in Maryland and Kentucky. To Mr. and Mrs. McAtee were born these children: Francis, Margaret, John, Susan, Clora, Thomas, Liza, Josephine, Joseph, July, Bridget and Martha. Subject is a stanch Democrat and cast his first vote for James K. Polk. He owns 180 acres of land, 150 of which are under cultivation.

ALFRED H. McBRIAR, farmer, is a son of David and Martha (Chambers) McBriar. They were born in Virginia in 1819 and 1833, respectively, and were married in their native State, where they lived a few years and then moved to Knox County, Ohio. By profession the father is a surgeon and dentist.About 1869 he took up his residence in Columbus, Ohio, where he still lives, doing a good business. Our subject was born in Ohio County, W. Va. His educational advantages were of the very best kind, having graduated at the Columbus High School in 1875. He also took a course of instruction at Notre Dame, and in 1880 graduated from the Columbus Commercial College. He then entered a wholesale house as assistant book-keeper, and later was traveling salesman for Marvell & Co. He then became traveling agent for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. In 1883, having traveled over twenty-six States, he decided to live a more settled life, consequently in June of that year he married Mollie Haynes, born in 1857. She is a daughter of Robert P. and Elizabeth (Darst) Haynes. Her father was born in 1821 in Virginia. He has held numerous honorable positions, and was one of the trustees of Purdue University, secretary of the state house building and member of the State Legislature. Her mother was a native of Ohio, born in 1818. They are now living in Kansas. Mr. and Mrs. McBriar have one child, Edna Lee. Mr. McBriar is a Democrat, and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

CAPT. GREEN McDONALD, son of Francis and Asenath (Allen) McDonald, was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1829. After attaining his majority he took charge of the home farm, caring for his parents until their death. In 1853 he married Maria J. Sparks, born in 1834, daughter of Daniel and Hannah (Sears) Sparks. She is a worthy member of the Christian Church. In 1861 Mr. McDonald enlisted in Company C, Sixth Indiana Infantry. After three months' service he returned home and helped organize Company H, Fifty-eighth Indiana Infantry, and as first lieutenant went out with it. He was soon promoted to captain and held that position till the close of the war. He is a Republican in politics and cast his first vote for Scott. He owns 160 acres of land, eighty acres of which was inherited from the estate. His father and mother were born in Kentucky and Ohio, respectively, the former born in 1806 and the latter in 1810. The father came with his parents to Indiana and settled on the farm where Green now lives. A few months before his death, which occurred in 1847, he was elected to the. office of justice of the peace. The mother died in 1882.

SAMUEL McKNIGHT is a native of Daviess County, Ind., where he was born in 1838. His parents were James and Rosann (Ginn) McKnight, born in Kentucky in 1796 and 1802 respectively. They were married and lived in Kentucky until 1833, when they came to Indiana, locating in the woods of Daviess County. The father died in 1866 and the mother in 1877. Samuel received the education and raising of the average farmer's boy. At the age of twenty he began working for himself among the farmers in the neighborhood, continuing to earn his living in this way for six years. He then began farming on the home place, and after buying out the other heirs to the property, he became sole proprietor. He is the owner of 146 acres and is well to do financially. In 1866 he married Malinda Dickerson, born in 1837, daughter of Zadock and Elizabeth (Cole) Dickerson, born in Maryland and Kentucky in 1795 and 1793 and died in 1877 and 1842, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. McKnight became the parents of three children: Laura B., Suda (deceased) and Lizzie (deceased). Both husband and wife are members of the Christian Church, and Mr. McKnight is a Republican in politics. He enlisted in Company I, Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry, in 1861, and was a faithful and courageous soldier while in the service. After serving eleven months he was discharged on account of disability. He has prospered well as a farmer and is one of the first men of the county.

LAWRENCE C. MEEHAN is a son of Thomas and Mary (Wierman) Meehan. The father was of Irish descent born in Pennsylvania, the mother of German descent born in Virginia_ They were married in Virginia, where they lived until 1841, when they came to Indiana and kept boarding house near New Albany. Later they purchased eighty acres in Daviess County, Ind., and lived there one year, when the father died. The mother's death occurred in 1880. Lawrence C. was born in 1834, in Pennsylvania. He received but very little schooling, but being very quick to learn, he obtained a fair education. He lived with his parents and took care of them as long as they lived. In early life he worked on a flat-boat, plying between Mt. Pleasant and New Orleans, and during the winter worked in a pork packing establishment. In 1864 he enlisted in Company F, Thirteenth Indiana Infantry, and served his country faithfully for about six months. He is a Democrat and a member of the Catholic Church, and has succeeded well in his financial undertakings.

BEL T. MORGAN is a son born to the marriage of Jesse Morgan and Elizabeth Cane, who were born in Pennsylvania in 1783 and 1788, respectively. The father was bound as apprentice to a blacksmith at Pittsburgh, but in a short time ran away to Kentucky. There he married and in 1819 came to Daviess County, Ind., and settled on the farm where Abel now lives. In 1833 he built him the finest brick house in the township, which is still in good preservation. He died in 1858 and his wife in 1860. Abel T. was born in Indiana in 1815. He obtained a somewhat limited education at the old time subscription schools, and at the age of eighteen began flat-boating, working at that in the spring and farming in summer time. He followed the river for twenty-three years and became pilot of a steamboat. In 1852 he was married to Rispha Sutten, born in 1834, daughter of Roland B. and Agnes (Smart) Sutten. Ten children were born to their union: Emily A., Elizabeth, John D., Lewis C., Eliza E., Lillie M., James A., Ada F., Rebecca A. and one unnamed. Mr. Morgan was constable of Barr Township for six years. He is a Democrat and is well to do financially, owning at one time 600 acres of land, but giving all to his children except about 120 acres.

JOHN D. MORGAN is the eldest son of Abel T. and Rispha (Sutten) Morgan. He was born in 1858 in the county where he now resides. In boyhood he acquired a good practical education in the common schools. At the age of twenty he began the battle of life for himself, and for about seven years traded in all kinds of stock. Since that time he has given his entire time and attention to farming. He has a nice farm of 107 acres in one of the best locations in the township. Besides this his wife owns eighty acres. In 1885 he led to the hymeneal altar Lizzie Honey, born in Barr Township in 1867. She is a daughter of John and Sarah A. (Spillman) Honey, both of whom were natives of Indiana, born in 1826 and 1842, respectively. They were married in 1865, and located in Daviess County, where both died, the father in 1882, and the mother in 1874. Mr. Morgan is one of the rising Democrats of the township, and cast his first vote for Hancock. He is an energetic young business man, and is respected by all who know him.

EDWARD MORRISON is a son born to the marriage of Michael Morrison and Mary Gibbons, who were born in the Emerald Isle, the father in 1798. They lived in their native land until 1832, when they embarked for America and landed in Canada, where they lived about twelve years, becoming proprietors of 400 acres of land. The father sold out and removed to Iowa, where he purchased a still larger tract of land, and settled his children around him. While a resident in Canada he was inspector of hotels and liquor establishments. He died in 1878. The mother's death occurred before leaving Canada. Edward was born in Ireland in 1829. His educational advantages were limited, and at the age of fifteen he began working for himself. He left home and crossed into Ohio, and later came to Lafayette, where he worked for a short period at odd jobs, and then learned the wagon and carriage-maker's trade. He then repaired to Pittsburg, Ind., and began working at his trade, with John Campbell as partner. He sold out and took a trip to St. Louis, Evansville, and Louisville, and finally settled at Terre Haute. In 1850 he went to California, and after remaining there two years he returned via Aspinwall, Jamaica, and New York, and after many hardships, sickness, and shipwreck, reached home in safety. He owns 244 acres of very fertile land. In 1853 he married Mary Meehan, born in 1839 in Pennsylvania. They have one child, Thomas J. The family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat in politics.

ABSALOM MYERS is a son of Absalom and Anne (Sherman) Myers. The father was born in Pennsylvania during the Revolution, and when only nine months old was deprived of his father, who fell in that war. From infancy he was raised to manhood by a farmer living in Pennsylvania. When twenty-four years old he married our subject's mother, by whom he had eight children. After living in Pennsylvania about twenty years he moved to Ohio, and died there in 1832. The mother lived till about 1875. Subject was born in Stark County, Ohio, in 1824. His services were very much needed at home in his boyhood days, consequently his educational advantages Are limited. At the age of seventeen he began to support himself and -Alter working several years at various occupations, was elected constable, which position he held for two years. He then gave his attention to well-digging, and when twenty-eight years old took up the carpenter's trade, and since has made that his occupation. In 1861 he disposed of his property in Ohio and came to Daviess County, Ind., and shortly after purchased his present farm. In In 1848 he was married to Nancy Gorsuch, born in Ohio in 1828, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Willard) Gorsuch. They became the parents of three children: Franklin A., Anne E. and Grant. Franklin is one of the three partners of the Washington Gazette. Mr. Myers is a Republican, and was ordained a minister of the United Brethren Church, his wife being a member.

GEORGE E. NORRIS, one of the prominent farmers of Daviess County, Ind., is a native of the county where he now resides, born in 1831. His parents, John D. and Elizabeth (Hays) Norris, were natives of Kentucky and Maryland, respectively, both born about 1808. They were married about 1829 in Daviess County, where they followed the lives of farmers. The mother died in 1854, and the father in 1880. Our subject's boyhood days were spent on the farm and in attending the district schools. At the age of twenty-one he began farming for himself on a rented place, continuing about fifteen years. He then purchased seventy-eight acres of land, and since that time he and his two boys have increased their farm to 340 acres. Besides this he owns a saw-mill and some very valuable machinery. In 1851 he was married to Julia A. Kidwell, born in Kentucky in 1836, daughter of Thomas and Theresa (Arvin) Kidwell. They became the parents of these children: John, James, Martha, Sarah, Theresa, Francis, Susan, Louis, George, Thomas, Mary, and an infant. The family are Catholic, and Mr. Norris is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Buchanan.


FATHER T. O'DONAGHUE, pastor of St. Mary's Church, is a son of James and Mary (Tooney) O'Donaghue, who were born in Cork County, Ireland. Some time after their marriage they came to New York City, where they lived about two years, and then moved to Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1840 they came to Daviess County., Ind., where they spent the remainder of their days in agricultural pursuits. They were the parents of ten children: Johanna, Mary, Margaret (deceased), Amelia, John (deceased), Timothy, James, Dennis, Michael (deceased) and Nora. Johanna, Mary and Nora belong to the sisterhood of the Benedictine order, Amelia to the Sisters of Providence, and Dennis is pastor of the St. Patrick's Church at Indianapolis. All the family are members of the Catholic Church. The father's death occurred in 1874. The mother is yet living, at the age of seventy-five, and resides with our subject, who was born in Daviess County in 1844. He attended the common schools, and also the college at Bardstown, Ky., for three years, and eventually finished his course at St. Meinrad's College in Spencer County, Ind., graduating in 1878. He then took charge of the church at Montezuma, Ind., for two years, and then came to St. Mary's, where he has remained ever since.

JAMES O'DONAGHUE may be mentioned as one of the prominent farmers of Daviess County, Ind. He is a son of James and Mary (Tooney) O'Donaghue, and was born in 1848. He received the advantage of the common schools, and when twenty-seven years old, his father having died, he took charge of the home farm of 235 acres, which he has farmed successfully ever since. In 1874 he was married to Bridget Bradley, a native of Daviess County, born about 1855, daughter of Francis and Ann (Kelley) Bradley. Mr. and Mrs. O'Donaghue are the parents of these six children: Mary, Anna, Hannah, James, Francis and Timothy. The family are members of the Catholic Church. Our subject is a stanch Democrat, and cast his first vote for Greeley. He owns one of the best farms in the township, and is one who takes an active interest in all that concerns the welfare of the community.

ALBERT PERKINS (deceased) was a son of Alfred and Rebecca (Ellis) Perkins, and was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1828. The parents were natives of Kentucky, where they married and lived until their removal to this county. The mother's death occurred in 1873, and the father's some years later. Subject received poor educational advantages, but on reaching manhood he began reading and traveling, thereby becoming a well informed man. In 1851 he took a trip across the desert of America to California, and after about three years returned and purchased 160 acres of land, and began tilling the soil. By his industry he increased his farm to 230 acres, and furnished it with good buildings. In 1856 he married Hannah L., daughter of James and Mary (Waller) Honey, born in 1829. Her parents were natives of Kentucky. The father died in 1847, but the mother lived several years afterward. Mr. and Mrs. Perkins became the parents of eight children: Peter T., Mary E., Sarah J., Ulysses G., James, Millard, George W. and Albert M. Mr. Perkins was a stanch Republican, and cast his first vote for Scott. The last nine years of his life was a period of constant suffering. He died in 1883, after a useful and well spent life. His widow and her two sons, Ulysses and James, have since taken charge of the farm.

JOHN W. PERKINS, hardware merchant at Montgomery, Ind., was born in the county where he now resides, in 1830. His educational advantages were limited, and he assisted his father on the farm until twenty years of age, when he married Kittle M. Dickerson, born in 1832, daughter of Zadok and Elizabeth (Cole) Dickerson. To Mr. and Mrs. Perkins ten children were born: Joseph P., Martha E., Mary L., Zadok, John W., Isaac D., David M., Robert, Lizzie and Abram C. In 1854 Mr. Perkins purchased his first eighty acres of land, and after farming it several years sold out and rented land until 1874, when he purchased the farm pre-empted by his grandfather, where he resided until 1882. He then moved to Montgomery and engaged in the hotel business for one year. Since that time he has been proprietor of the "Perkins Hardware Store." He has prospered in his business enterprises, and now owns a good store, dwelling-house and three lots. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-seventh Indiana Infantry, and fought bravely for the Union until he was honorably discharged in 1863. His parents, John and Eleanor (Jones) Perkins, were born in Bourbon County, Ky., the father in 1790 and the mother in 1796. They came to Davies County, Ind., when it was an almost unbroken wilderness. Here the father farmed in summer and operated a distillery in winter. His death occurred in 1872 and the mother's in 1871.

JUDSON PURCELL is a son of Jesse and Martha (Small) Purcell, , natives of this county. The father, who was born in 1823, was a farmer, and died in 1885, and the mother in 1866. Judson's grandfather, Purcell, came to Daviess County in 1808, and located in Washington Township, where the old fort stood, which he helped to build. He lived to be over ninety-five years old. Judson was born in 1852, and was educated in the common schools. When twenty-one years old he began the battle of life for himself, and worked at various occupations for a number of years. In 1874 he was married to Elizabeth Davis, born in 1852, daughter of Milton and Mary (Robinson) Davis. Mr. and Mrs. Purcell have six children: William D., Mary J., Anna B., Maria, Sarah and JesSe. Mrs. Purcell is a member of the Christian Church, and her husband is a stanch Republican, and cast his first vote for Hayes. By hard work and good management they own_ 118 acres of very good land.

JEREMIAH RANEY. James Raney, the father of our subject, was born in Kentucky in 1809. When nine years old he came with his parents to Martin County, Ind., where he grew to manhood, and lived for nearly sixty-four years on the same farm. He was a farmer, and owned at one time 1,000 acres of land. He married Mary Holland, born in Ireland in 1820. He died in 1882. Subject was born in Martin County in 1843, and aided his father on the farm until twenty-seven years old. In 1870 he led to the hymeneal altar Elizabeth A., daughter of Joseph and Rose Anne (Hayden) Arvin. She was born in 1847, and bore her husband six children: James, Helen, Mary, Charles, Anne and Margaret. All the family are Catholics, and Mr. Raney is a stanch Democrat. He received eighty acres of land from his father, and purchased forty more, but soon after sold out, and purchased 147 acres in this county, on which he built a residence. His house caught fire and was consumed shortly after, and after building another house he found he was in debt $1,900. By industry and good management he has increased his farm to 213 acres. He keeps a strict account of all receipts and expenditures, and at the end of each year takes an invoice of all stock, implements, growing grain, etc.

MICHAEL SAUSE is a son of James and Ellen (Stokes) Sause, natives of County Tipperary, Ireland. They came to America in 1838, and located on eighty acres of land in Daviess County, Ind. The father died in 1852, and the mother in 1857. Michael was born in the same county as his parents, in 1826. His educational advantages were limited to the common schools, both in the old country and America. When nineteen years old he purchased forty acres of land, and at the death of his father fell heir to eighty acres more. At a later date he sold his land and purchased his present farm of 160 acres, since increased to 240 acres. In 1852 he married Margaret Downey, born in Ireland in 1834. Her father was also a native of the Emerald Isle, and in 1845 came to America, locating in Pennsylvania. He died in 1846, and the mother, in Indiana, in 1872. Mr. and Mrs. Sause became the parents of eight children: Mary 0., Alice, Catharine, James T., Agnes, Margaret H., Matthew M. and Michael R. All the family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Sause is a Democrat. and cast his first vote for Cass.

SAMUEL J. SCOTT, druggist, of Montgomery, Ind., is a son of Thomas J. and Elizabeth (Kennedy) Scott, and was born in Wayne County, Ky. At the age of fifteen years he began the battle of life for himself, working as a farm laborer. About four years later he entered the dry goods store of J. C. Montgomery as salesman, continuing at that occupation for about fifteen years, the greater part of the time being spent in a drug store. In 1883 he began selling drugs on his own responsibility. carrying a 82,000 stock of goods. In 1877 he was married to Anna Doane, who bore him three children: Florence E., John and James. Since 1880 Mr. Scott has been clerk of the town of Montgomery, and has filled that position very creditably. He is a leading Republican of the township, and cast his first vote for Grant. He is a good business man, ever ready to aid the poor and distressed, and is well fixed financially. His father was a native of Kentucky, and the mother of Virginia. They were married and lived in Kentucky until the war, when they were compelled to leave that State by the persecution of the rebels, as the father was a strong Union man. They came to Indiana, locating in Daviess County, where the father followed the occupation of farming, and also worked at the stone-cutter's trade to some extent. At his death he left about 1,500 acres of land in Kentucky to be divided among his four children. The father's death occurred in 1865, and the mother's, in Pike County, in 1885.

ROBERT A. SHIRCLIFF is a son of Thomas and Catherine (Cissel) Shircliff. The parents were natives of Kentucky, the father born in 1803 and the mother in 1806. The father was a farmer, and owned 420 acres of land. He died in 1857, and the mother in 1863. Robert was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1832, and had only the advantages of the old-time subscription schools, but improved every opportunity in order to acquire a better education. He taught school two terms and received 87-i cents per day. Since that time he has given his attention to farming. In 1855 he purchased 100 acres of land, which by industry he has increased to 350 acres. In 1857 he wedded Mary E. Summers, born in 1836, daughter of Benjamin and Catharine (Nalley) Summers. To Mr. and Mrs. Shircliff eleven children were born: Catherine A., Sarah A., Thomas K., Benjamin, Joseph R., Vincent, Mary, Robert, John, Basil and Philip. The family are Catholics. Mr. Shircliff is a Democrat, and for two years during the war served as justice of the peace.

SYLVESTER SMITH was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1823, and is a son of James and Martha (Mattingly) Smith. He received a limited education, and at the age of twenty began as a farmer on a rented place. Some three years later he purchased twenty acres of timber land, on which he built his first log house. He now owns a good frame dwelling, surrounded by 409 acres of very fine land. In 1843 he married Martha A. Gootee, born in 1825, who bore him fifteen children: James, William, John, Martha, Sarah, William, Barbara, Charles, Marion, George, Thomas, Lee, Francis, Catherine and Augusta. The family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Smith deals extensively in stock, and during the last four years has given almost his entire attention to stock trading. In 1874 he purchased a thoroughbred Norman horse at a cost of $2,750, and in 1883 purchased another which cost $1,800. He has held the positions of director, vice-president and superintendent of the Martin County Fair Association. He is a Democrat, and as a farmer has been very successful. Mrs. Smith is a daughter of Silas and Barbara (Walker) Gootee, who were born in Kentucky. They both died in 1848, within four weeks of each other.

ANDREW SOEDER is a native of Bavaria, Germany, where he was born in 1825. His parents, John and Anna (Faulstich) Soeder, were born in the same place in 1798 and 1800, respectively. The father served sixteen years in the regular army of Germany as musician. He died in 1842, and the mother in 1855. Our subject was educated in the German schools, and in 1856 he bade adieu to home and native land and embarked for the United States. He worked by the month in Switzerland County, Ind., for over two years, and then he and his brother purchased 120 acres of very poor land. He soon after purchased his brother's share, and later sold out the entire farm at a good profit, and in 1870 came to Daviess County, where he bought 113 acres of the farm where he now lives, since increased to 277 acres. In 1851 he was married, in Germany, to Mary Rost, born in 1832, who bore him thirteen children: Monika, Andrew, Ferdinand, Barbara, Joseph, John, Anna, Regina, Mary, Paul, Simon, Rosa and Lawrence. All the family are members of the Catholic Church, and Mr. Soeder is a Democrat. He has been quite prosperous and is much respected by his friends and neighbors.

ELIJAH TODD is a son of Nathan and Esther V. (Hooks) Todd, natives of Virginia, where they married and lived until 1810, when they came West, traveling through Kentucky, Indiana and Illinois, but three years later returned to Virginia, and there spent the remainder of their lives. The father was a farmer, and was also quite a noted hunter and Indian fighter. Elijah was born in Virginia in 1817. He received no educational advantages, for during the winter seasons the schools were too distant to permit his attending, and during the summer his services were needed at home. When seventeen years old he began working for himself. He joined his brother in Illinois, and with him worked on the Mississippi River and its tributaries for about three years. After coming to this State, in 1840, he worked on flatboats, and made twenty-one trips to New Orleans. While working on the Mississippi, in 1838, he was one of the men who took Jackson to New Orleans to celebrate the battle fought by him at that place. Mr. Todd owns 127 acres of good land, and in 1844 was married to Senath Burrass, who bore him seven children: Elizabeth, Susan, James, Mary A., John, George and Rebecca. Both parents are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Todd was one of the most distinguished hunters of his township, and killed numerous buffalo, bear, wolves, deer, turkeys and panther.

ANDREW J. VEST was born in 1844 in Greene County, Ind. He remained at home until sixteen years old, when he began to work his own way in the world and worked by the month for about a year. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Indiana Infantry and fought for the preservation of the Union for three years. He was at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and in that famous series of battles from Ringgold to Atlanta. At the battle of Winchester he was taken prisoner and for four months was an inhabitant of the loathsome prisons of the South. After his return home he attended school for some time, and in 1865 was married to Miss J. Parsons, born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1846, daughter of Dr. I. J. and Mary (Patterson) Parsons. Mr. and Mrs. Vest became the parents of these eight children: Mary, John, Olive, Susan, May, Martha, James and Edith. Both husband and wife are members of the Christian Church and he is a Republican. He purchased his first forty acres in 1867, but now owns 240 acres. His parents were Andrew J. and Elizabeth (Wilson) Vest, natives of Virginia and Tennessee, born in 1815 and 1818, and died in 1845 and 1873, respectively.

JOHN R. WEDDING. Lloyd Wedding, our subject's father, was born in Maryland in 1793, and moved with his father to Kentucky in 1811, where he married Anne L. Raney, in 1817. She was born in 1799. They came to Daviess County, Ind., in 1818, where they located on forty acres of timber land. At a later period he purchased the farm where John now lives, and there spent the remainder of his days. He was a merchant the last thirteen years of his life and was constable and magistrate of Barr Township for five years. He died in 1863 and the mother three years later. John R. Wedding was born in 1819 in what was then
Daviess County. He received poor educational advantages; but on reaching manhood he again attended school and thus obtained a fair education. When twenty-nine years old he rented a farm, and after working in this way for about five years he purchased 120 acres of land. Some time later he sold his farm and moved on the old homestead and cared for his parents until their deaths. In 1846 he married Elizabeth Kidwell, born in 1820, who bore him these children: Lloyd, Nicholas, Theodore, George, Emily, Mary, Louisa, john, Arnold, Francis and Elizabeth. All of the sons are farmers. In 1873 Mrs. Wedding and Emily died and in the early part of 1874 Mary also died. In 1875 Mr. Wedding married Sarah (Morgan) Adkins, born in 1834. She is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Wedding served as justice of the peace for twelve years, and in 1876 was chosen to fill the position of county commissioner. He is a Democrat though he voted the Whig ticket until 1856.

WILLIAM C. WILLEFORD, M. D., one of the leading doctors of Barr Township, Daviess Co., Ind., is a son of George A. and Minerva (Hogan) Willeford, who were born in Virginia and Tennessee in 1802 and 1808, respectively. The father went to Tennessee when quite young, where he married and lived until 1837, when he moved to Illinois. He was a machinist by trade and during the war constructed a cotton gin from his own model, but the greater part of his life was spent in farming. He died in 1877 and the mother in 1883. Our subject, William C., was born in Illinois in 1849. He attended the common schools when quite young and later the high school at Marion, Ill. He clerked about two years in a drug store and was in the recorder's office for the three following years. He devoted much of his spare moments to the study of medicine and in 1873-74 took a term of lectures in the Chicago Medical College, and after practicing about seven years completed his medical course in the College of Indiana in 1881. The same year he located in Montgomery where he has since remained, meeting with good success in the practice of his profession. He operated a drug store for about four years, but finding that his practice required his entire attention he sold out his drugs. He has held the positions of county and township physician and was postmaster of Montgomery for over three years. He is a strong supporter of Republican principles and cast his first vote for Grant. In 1876 he was married to Louisa Wiley, born in 1854, in the same county as himself. To their union were born these children: Laura, George A., Edna and Anna.

JOSEPH WILSON, an old pioneer preacher of southern Indiana, is a son of Jesse and Winnie (Humphrey) Wilson, both natives of North Carolina. They came to Indiana in 1821, and located in Greene County. The father was educated for the Presbyterian ministry, but before his death he united with the Christian Church, and became a minister of that denomination. Subject was born in North Carolina in 1796. He received but little education, barely learning to read and write. At the age of -twenty-four years he united with the Christian Church. For about sixty-three years he has proclaimed the Gospel in southern Indiana and adjoining counties of Illinois. He is the oldest minister of his denomination in the State, and has been the means of converting about 4,000 persons to Christianity. For the first thirty years of his labor he received not a cent in payment. In 1820 he married Anna Goad, born in Tennessee in 1804. She -was a daughter of Stephen and Rachael Goad. To Mr. and Mrs. Wilson these children were born: John, Matilda, William, David, James, Mary, Malinda, Lucinda, Martha, Joseph and Sarah. Mr. Wilson owns eighty acres of land, and, though not rich in worldly goods, he is rich in noble deeds, and the love, respect, and universal confidence of all who know him.

MADISON TOWNSHIP.

GEORGE D. ABRAHAM, harness and hardware merchant at Odon, Ind., was born October 16, 1844, in Columbiana County, Ohio, and is a son of Daniel and Eliza (Ransom) Abraham. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, and was born June 6, 1814, in Steubenville, Ohio. He was a farmer; married in 1842, and in 1855 came to Indiana, and in 1870 moved to Kansas, where he died in June, 1876. The mother was a native of the " Buckeye State," born December 3, 1816. She died December 15, 1878. Subject attended the district schools, and at the age of seventeen became one of the "boys in blue," enlisting in August, 1862, in Company I, Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, for three years or during the war. He took an active part in the battles of Resaca, Nashville, Franklin, Kenesaw Mountain, siege of Knoxville, the Atlanta campaign, and numerous minor engagements. He was among the fortunate ones, not receiving a wound or being sick while in the service, but was always ready for active duty. He remained in the field until hostilities ceased, when he received his discharge, July 5, 1865, at Indianapolis, Ind. After returning from the war he manufactured wagons at Odon for ten years, meeting with good success. December 23, 1869, he married Emma Smith, born April 11, 1852, a daughter of John V. and Susan Smith. His wife died April 23, 1874, after having borne her husband two children, one now living, Cora E. July 5, 1875, he married Adaline Blough, daughter of Joseph and Mary E. Blough. Mrs. Abraham was born August 6, 1852, in Stark County, Ohio. To them were born six children, four of whom are living: Nora E., Daniel J., Clarence W. and Mabel J. In 1874 Mr. Abraham began selling agricultural implements, and in 1881 he and Howard Crooke became partners in a general hardware and harness store in Odon. The following year Mr. Crooke sold his interest, and since that time Mr. Abraham has been sole proprietor of a fine stock of goods. He is one of the solid business men of the township, and has the reputation of being honest and enterprising He owns seventy acres of land, and good business and dwelling house; also property in Elnora. He is a Republican in politics, and was constable of Madison Township for four years, and deputy sheriff for two years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

REV. ALBERT W. ARFORD, farmer and minister, was born in Ohio, July 31, 1847, and is a son of Jacob and Catharine (Bash) Arford. He remained with his parents until seventeen years of age, and at the age of eighteen entered the Mt. Morris College, at Mount Morris, Ill., and remained two terms, and in 1866 entered the Hartsville University, in Bartholomew County, Ind., and pursued the teachers' course of instruction for two years. At the age of twenty he began pedagoging, and continued at that occupation for eight years. He taught three years in Kansas (until 1875), when he returned to Indiana and assisted his father on the farm until 1878. He then began studying for the ministry, and in June of the same year was licensed to preach. In 1882 he was placed in charge of the Shoals Circuit, and now has charge of the Raglesville Circuit. He is an able minister, and is spoken very highly of as a Christian gentleman. October 6, 1869, he married Louisa Winklepleck, born May 7, 1854, in Ohio. She is a daughter of S. and B. Winklepleck. Mr. and Mrs. Arford are the parents of these children: Luna E., Edwin K., Frank W., Louis D., Mina M., Albert B. and Jacob Ray. In 1878 Mr. Arford purchased forty acres of land in Madison Township, where he hasmade his home. He now owns 120 acres of good land. In polities he is Republican, and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant.

FRANK B. ARFORD is a son of Jacob and Catharine. (Bash) Arford, and was born in Ohio, October 26, 1851. The father was of German lineage, born in Maryland, in 1800. His first marriage occurred in Pennsylvania, in 1821. In 1831 he moved to Ohio, where his wife died. In 1843 he married our subject's mother, and in 1854 he came to Daviess County, Ind., where he purchased 160 acres of land in Madison Township. His death occurred December 8, 1884. The mother was also of German lineage, born in Ohio, in 1812. She was twice married. Since the death of her husband she has made her home with her son, Frank, who in boyhood attended the district schools and aided his father on the farm. He attended the seminary at Roanoke, Ind., for one term, and when nineteen years old began teaching school, and taught two terms. July 6, 1871, he married Jane Wilson, who was born in Ohio, February 5, 1852. She is a daughter of Dorsey and Caroline (Hayes) Wilson, and became the mother of these children: Albert R., Mary M., Carrie C., Roland D. and Lillian R. Since his marriage Mr. Arford has resided on the old home farm, where he owns 120 acres of land. He has been quite prosperous as a farmer, and is a good citizen of the township. In politics he is a Republican, and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. He and wife are members of the United Brethren Church.

JOHN W. BURRELL, undertaker, of Odon, Ind., was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, January 3, 1829, son of Richard T. and Margaret (Canestrick) Burrell, who were born in Maryland and Ohio, respectively. The father went to Ohio in his youth, where he spent the remainder of his life. He died in the prime of his life, in 1844. At the time of his death he owned seventy-five acres of land. The mother was of German descent, and died in 1832. Our subject lived with his people until he was eighteen years old, working on the farm and attending district school. In 1847 he begat working as an apprentice at the cabinet-maker's trade, continuing at that occupation many years. July 7, 1853, he wedded Sarah, daughter of Hughey and Ruth McCoy. She was born in Ohio, in March, 1837. To their union eight children were born, six of whom are living • James A., Richard T., Harley T., Samuel D., Henry H. and Anna M. (wife of William Odell). The children are all industrious and are doing well for themselves. Mr. Burrell settled in New Cumberland, Ohio, after marriage, where he lived four years, working at his trade. In 1858 he moved to Daviess County, Ind., and began farming. In 1863 he abandoned this occupation and moved to Odon, where he resumed his trade. A few years later he gave up this occupation and began the undertaker's business. In politics he is a Republican. He was constable of Madison Township for about two and one-half years, and supervisor for eight years. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

WILLIAM CLINTON was born in Orange County, Ind., March 23, 1833, being the son of Henry Clinton. The father was born in the Emerald Isle," and when an infant was brought to America by his parents. His father was a Revolutionary soldier and died from a wound received in that war. Subject's father came to Indiana at a very early date, and in 1842 came to Daviess County and followed the life of a farmer. He died about 1873. The mother was a North Carolinian by birth, and died about 1863. Our subject, William, received the most of his education at the subscription schools. He remained at home until twenty-one years of age. November 19, 1857, he married Elizabeth Flinn, daughter of Jacob and Berlinda Flinn. She was born January 7, 1834, in Lawrence County, Ind. They became the parents of these children: Sarah and Jacob M. (deceased), Martha J. (wife of Jesse F. Ketcham), Laura B. (wife of Jacob
Shields), Flora (died in 1880 aged fourteen years), Rozilla, Charles W. (deceased) and William Oily (deceased). After his marriage Mr. Clinton lived one year on the home place, and then located on forty acres of land which he had purchased in 1853. He now owns 204 acres of good land, on which he erected a fine residence and good farm buildings. Mr. Clinton is a Democrat, and in 1869 was commissioned justice of the peace, and was twice re-elected. He is one of the few surviving old settlers who yet remain to tell interesting incidents of early times. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

JAMES M. CROOKE is a native of Kentucky, where he was born August 12, 1822, son of Oily and Nancy (Cruse) Crooke (elsewhere written). Subject attended the subscription schools in boyhood and made his home with his parents until 1841. When nineteen years of age he began teaching school and continued that occupation for eight years, meeting with flattering success. He received for his services $12 per month. November 5, 1845, he married Maria Ann Barnes, born November 4, 1827, in Orange County, Ind., daughter of Dean and Mahala (Athon) Barnes. January 24, 1861, his wife died after having borne eight children, three of whom are living: 011y F., James M. and John B. 01ly is living in Martin County, farming; James is in Mitchell, Ind., in a printing office, and John is a teacher by profession. In 1858 Mr. Crooke came to Daviess County and settled at Odon, and entered into partnership with his brother, Howard, and another gentleman, in a general merchandise store, at which he and his brother continued for several years after their partner had sold out his interest. In 1875 Mr. Crooke moved to California and lived for about three years near the " Golden Gate," keeping hotel; but not liking the country he returned to Odon, in 1878. July 17, 1862, he married Julia M. Calvert, born in Kentucky, April 24, 1833, daughter of George and Sarah Calvert. To their union five children were born, four of whom are living: Charles, who is in partnership with his father; William, clerking in a store in Mitchell; Lizzie V., and Albert E. Mr. Crooke as a merchant is enterprising and possesses rare business qualities. He has a fine stock of goods and commands a large trade. He is the oldest merchant in Odon, a Democrat in politics, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HOWARD CROOKE, attorney, of Odon, Ind., was born in Lawrence County, Ind., February 7, 1825, and is one of thirteen children born to Oily and Nancy (Cruse) Crooke. The father was of Irish descent, born in 1798, in Kentucky. He was a tanner by trade, and was married in 1819, and in 1823 moved to Lawrence County, Ind., where he built a tannery and worked at his old trade. In 1863 he came to Daviess County, Ind., where he and his son James purchased a farm of 156 acres. His death occurred October 11, 1884. The mother was born October 7, 1802, in Virginia, and died March 17, 1882. Subject received his education in the district schools, and made his home with his parents until twenty years of age. In early life he learned the tanner's trade of his father, but on attaining his majority abandoned that occupation, and hired out as a traveling salesman to a merchant at Springville, continuing in this business eight years. April 6, 1854, he married Ann Culmer, daughter of Stephen and Sarah Culmer. Mrs. Crooke was born in the parish of Kent, England, July 23, 1833. She came to the United States with her parents when a child, and lived for some years in Pennsylvania, and then came to Lawrence County, Ind. To Mr. and Mrs. Crooke's union six children were born, five of whom are living: Sarah M. (wife of James Burrell), Fanny C., Margaret A., Harry H., and Lillie B. Mr. Crooke came to Daviess County after his marriage, and purchased 115 acres of land and began his career as a tiller of the soil. He lived there bat a short time when he sold out and moved to Odon, and began merchandising. In 1855 he and Oily Owen began doing business together, but in the fall Owen sold his interest, and the next spring Zimri Garten became his partner. Four years later they took our subject's brother James in as partner, but Garten soon sold his interest, and the property then belonged to the brothers. In 1864 they sold out to Carrell & Garten. Since that time our subject has given his attention to farming and serving as notary public. He owns 165 acres of land in Daviess County, and 133 acres in Martin County, besides a dwelling-house, office, and business block in Odon. In politics he is a Republican, and cast his first vote for Taylor. He is one of the leading men in his party in the county, and in 1855 was elected justice of the peace for Madison Township, and served eight years. In 1864 he was elected to the State Legislature, and served one regular term and one special term. In 1876 he was appointed notary public, and was twice re-elected. He came to Odon when there were only six families in the place.

DR. JOHN DEARMIN, of Odon, Ind., is a native of Monroe County, Ind.., where he was born April 27, 1845. His parents, Joseph and Mary E. (Reiney) Dearmin, were natives of Virginia, born in 1812 and 1826, respectively. The father was of Scotch descent and a farmer. He came with his parents to Indiana in 1820 and located near Bloomington, but in 1875 come to Daviess County, and died at Raglesville in 1876. The mother died. in Monroe County, Ind., in 1855. Our subject received his education in the district schools. When nearly seventeen, March 10, 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry for three years, or during the war. He was in the battles of Buckton Station, Winchester, Chancellorsville, Antietam, Gettysburg, Resaca, and siege of Atlanta. In 1864 he was transferred to Company C, Seventieth Regiment, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea. He remained in the field until April 5, 1865, when he received his discharge at Goldensburg, N. C. After his return from the army he worked as a day laborer on the farm for one year, and then commenced the study of medicine under Dr. Howard Smith at Sydney, Ill., with whom he remained three years. September 15, 1865, he married Eliza A. Smith, daughter of William Smith. She was born February 22, 1849, in Monroe County, Ind., and died March 1, 1874, leaving these three children: Minnie, Walter, and Elbert. November 24, 1875, he married Susan Pershing, daughter of Solomon and Magdaline Pershing. Mrs. Dearmin was born January 3, 1851, in Ohio. To their union four children were born, two of whom are living: May and Day. In 1872 Dr. Dearmin began practicing his profession in Hindoostan, Ind., and after remaining there two years, came to Daviess County, and continued his practice. In 1882 he moved to Odon, and has a good practice. He has erected him a fine dwelling-house, and is comfortably and elegantly situated. He is a Republican, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

WILLIAM GARTEN, an old settler of Daviess County, Ind., was born in Lawrence County, Ind., August 7, 1822, and is one of four children born to James and Betsey (Sears) Garten. Our subject's paternal grandfather was of Welsh descent. He was a pioneer of Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky and Lawrence County, Ind., having killed deer and wild game of various kinds in each State. He was a skillful marksman and rivaled Daniel Boone in his love for forest life. James was born in Tennessee in 1788. He removed to Kentucky in youth, where he resided until 1816, when he moved to Lawrence County, Ind., purchased land and began tilling the soil. He speculated largely in stock, which he took to Chicago, driving them through unbroken forests and across rivers and creeks. He moved to Daviess County in 1839 and purchased 320 acres of land. He died in said county May 30, 1874. He was one of the first settlers in the township and assisted largely in forming the first settlements. The mother died in 1822. Subject's mother died when he was but two weeks' old. He was reared by his people with whom he remained until twenty-two years old. February 22, 1844, he married Margaret, daughter of Zacharias and Peggy Dicks. Mrs. Garten was born November 13, 1822, in Monroe County, Ind. To their union eight children were born, seven of whom are living. The children's names are Sarah E., Mary A., Zacharias T., James M., John L., William H., Zimri M. and Henry S. After marriage Mr. Garten lived on the old home place for two years, and in 1846 he purchased 180 acres of land, where he settled and has since resided. He has been an industrious, hard-working man, and by his energy and close attention to business now owns 330 acres of land, besides giving 145 acres to his children. In politics he is a Republican and cast his first vote for Henry Clay.

JOHN M. HINDMAN is a native of Scotland, Ind., born December 6, 1846, son of John and Maria (McDonald) Hindman natives of Indiana, born in 1819 and 1817, respectively. The father was of Irish descent, married in 1838, in Dubois County, Ind. In 1848 he purchased 100 acres of land near Newberry, Ind., where he has since lived. The mother died May 24, 1878. Our subject was reared at home and received his education in the district schools and in addition attended school for three months at New Lebanon, Ind., and three months at Hartsville, Ind. In the winter of 1873 he entered the teacher's profession, but taught only one term. October 20, 1872, he wedded Elizabeth Wesner, -daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Wesner. Mrs. Hindman was born December 1, 1853, in Indiana. They became the parents of these children: Lulu, May, Aldo Frasier, Alvin Ernest (deceased) and Ermin Elden. After marriage Mr. Hindman located in Newberry, Ind., but remained there only a short time. He then lived two years in southern Illinois and then came back to " Hosierdom," locating in Odon, where he began merchandising. He sold his stock of goods in 1877 to Odell Bros. The same year he established himself in the same business and continued about two years, when he sold out and removed to Washington. In 1885 he purchased 120 acres of land in Madison Township, where he now resides. He is an enterprising business man, and in politics is a Republican, and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant.

WILLIAM HUBBARD, brick-mason, of Odon, Ind., was born in Kentucky September 6, 1826. He resided with his parents and attended the district and subscription schools until he was sixteen years of age, when he began working as a day laborer. At the age of eighteen he entered the teacher's profession, continuing that occupation for eight years. February 22; 1849, he wedded Hannah M. Laughlin, born July 30, 1829, and daughter of John and Sarah Laughlin To them were born eight children, these seven now living: Sarah C. (wife of Lewis Carpenter), Thomas J., William C., Mary C. (wife of John Bowers), Martha E., John Sherman and Joseph Harvey Monroe. After marriage Mr. Hubbard entered 160 acres of land and began tilling the soil. March 14, 1848, he enlisted in the Third Regular Dragoons in the Mexican war, but went no farther than Jefferson Barracks, Mo., as the war closed that same year. When the Rebellion broke out he enlisted August 6, 1861, in Company B, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry and fought in the battles of Winchester, Cedar Mountain, Antietam, Chancellors-vine and numerous minor engagements. While fighting at the last named battle he was shot in the foot by a nainie-ball May 3, 1863, and was taken to the hospital at Washington City. In July of that year he was sent home on furlough, but not recovering his former health he remained at home. In 1873 he sold his farm and purchased forty-nine acres of land near Odon, where he has a fine residence. He is a Republican, and a member of the I. 0. 0. F. Since 1854 he has given the most of his attention to the brick-mason's trade. His parents were William and Henrietta (Baker) Hubbard, natives of Kentucky, born in 1791, and died in 1865 and 1840, respectively. They were married in 1812 and came to Indiana in 1833. The father was a farmer and owned 120 acres of land.

SETH L. KETCHAM is a native of Daviess County, Ind., born November 8, 1839, and is one of ten children born to Daniel and Elizabeth (Goodwin) Ketcham. The father was of English extraction, born in Shelby County, Ky., in 1810. He came to Indiana at the age of fourteen, and lived in different parts of the " Hoosier State," until 1838, when he came to Daviess County, where he afterward became the owner of 600 acres of land. He died in October, 1865. The mother was born in Jackson County, Ind., in 1817. Since the death of her husband she has kept house, keeping some of her children, or grandchildren with her. Subject attended the common schools, and also the State University of Bloomington, Ind., in the winters of 1857 and 1858. At the age of seventeen, he began pedagoguing and followed that occupation for about twenty years, teaching continually, with the exception of two years, and meeting with the best success. He was one of the boys in blue, and in August, 1861, enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Indiana Infantry for three years, or during the war. He remained in the field seven months, and was then discharged, owing to disability from chronic rheumatism. July 16, 1864, he wedded Elmira Benham, daughter of Ira and Mary Benhan. She was 'born in 1839 and bore these five children: Mary, Daniel W., Laura M., John M. and W. Evert. Mary is a teacher, and Daniel is a student at West Point; the remainder are at home. Mrs. Ketcham, died January 13, 1881, and September 15, of the same year, Mr. Ketcham married Mary Benham, a half sister of his first wife. She was born September 16, 1855, in Greene County, Ind. Mr. Ketcham was given eighty acres of land by his father, which he has since increased to 180 acres. He has a fine two-story residence, and good substantial barns and granaries. He is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for George B. McClellan. In June, 1884, he was appointed trustee of the township, by the county board of commissioners, to fill an unexpired term. In 1880 he was appointed to take the census of Madison Township.

ALLAN K. LANE, M. D., of Odon, Ind., was born in Washington County, Ind., January 25, 1843, and is one of five children born to Richard and Jane (Martin) Lane, born in Tennessee and Kentucky, in 1811 and 1813, respectively. The father was of French-Irish descent, and was a merchant, and a minister of the Christian Church. He was married in Kentucky, about 1837, and soon after moved to Martinsburg, Ind., where he passed the remainder of his days. He died in 1845. The mother died in 1873. Our subject's literary education was acquired in the common schools. At the age of seventeen, he commenced the study of medicine under Dr. James McPheeters, at Fredericksburg, Ind., with whom he remained about four years. In 1865 he commenced practicing his profession at Pitt's Point, Ky. He remained there until 1869, when he came to Daviess County, Ind., and located first in Raglesville, and then in Odon, in 1876. By a thorough knowledge of his profession, he has the entire confidence of the people and is pronounced a first-class physician and surgeon. He owns 200 acres of fine land on the outskirts of Odon, besides his fine town property. In politics he is conservative, but rather favors Republican principles. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and I. 0. 0. F. He has been married three times. He married his first wife, Angie Glenn, in 1863. She was born in 1844 and bore three children; only two, Maud and Blanche, are living. Mrs. Lane died in 1875, and the next year he married Mary J.Kelsey, born in 1853, and died in 1878. To them was born one child, now deceased. Dr. Lane took for his third wife Sarah Kelsey, sister of his second wife. They have one child, named Bradie. The Doctor and his wife are members of the Christian Church.

JOSEPH D. LAUGHLIN, attorney at law and notary public at Odon, Incl., was born in Martin County, Ind., February 1, 1845, and is one of ten children born to John 0. M. and Elizabeth (Gyger) Laughlin. The father was of Irish descent, born in Kentucky, in 1815, and is a farmer by occupation. He came to Indiana, when but three years of age. In 1843 he moved to Martin County, where he entered forty acres of land, and where he has since resided, but now owns 160 acres of land.. The mother is of German extraction, born in Tennessee in 1814. Our subject attended the district schools, and in addition attended two terms at Zion's Seminary, in Zion, Ill., in 1869, and the following year attended the two terms at Dover Hill, Martin County. He was one of the " boys' in blue," and August 9, 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He took part in the battles of Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg,Resaca, Dalton, Peach Tree Creek, siege of Atlanta, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea, and in the grand review at Washington, D. C. In November, 1864, he was transferred to Company C, Seventieth Regiment. He was in the field until the close of war. October, 1873, he married Lakie, daughter of Charles and Amanda Legerwood. She was born in Daviess County in 1852. To them were born these children: Laurette, Edgar Tecumseh, Lillie, Maud, Bertha, Oliver and Elizabeth. Mr. Laughlin has lived in Odon since his marriage. In 1870 he began teaching school, continuing that occupation eight years. The last three years of his school teaching he studied law, and, since 1877, has given his entire time to the study and practice of that profession. In 1881 he drew up a petition for the purpose of changing the name of the town (then Clarksburg) to Odon, and presented it to the county board of commissioners. The petition was granted. Mr. Laughlin is a Republican, and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. In 1874 he was appointed notary public, and has since held that office. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.

DANIEL L. MCCARTER was born in Daviess County, Ind., February 16, 1840, son of Moses and Sarah (Ketcham) McCarter. Daniel attended the common school and remained with his people until after he was twenty-one years of age. He was a strong Union man, and September 10, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Regiment Indiana Infantry, for three years. He took an active part in the battles of Resaca, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Winchester, and a number of lesser engagements. At the battle of Winchester he received a flesh wound, but was in the hospital only a short time. He was also slightly wounded at Gettysburg. At the expiration of his term he returned home, and September 17, 1867, married Amanda Ledger-wood, daughter of 'Charles and Amanda (Chambers) Ledgerwood. Mrs. McCarter was born in Daviess County, Ind., May 9, 1847. They have these six children: William H., Charles M., Moses A., John W., Daniel E. and Mina. Mr. McCarter located on the old home place after marriage, where he has since resided. He owns 265 acres of land, and is well to do financially. He was a brave and faithful soldier during the war, and is a useful and honest citizen. He is a Republican, and cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

WILLIAM H. McCARTER is a son of Moses and Sarah (Ketcham) McCarter, and was born in Daviess County, Ind., April 4, 1847. His father was born in Tennessee September 24, 1813, and was of Irish descent and a farmer by occupation. He was married in Monroe County, Ind., in 1834, and a few years later came to Daviess County, Ind., where he became the owner of 505 acres of land. He died of consumption December 27, 1856. The mother was a German by birth, born June 21, 1812, in Kentucky, and died in the fall of 1863. Subject attended the common schools, and after the death of his parents still resided on the home farm until his marriage to Miranda C. Laughlin March 29, 1866. Mrs. McCarter was born in Martin County, Ind., August 1, 1846, and is a daughter of John 0. M. and Elizabeth Laughlin. To their union eight children were born, six of whom are living: Minerva E., Daniel R., Mary I., John K., William 0., and Opha E. Mr. McCarter began farming on 100 acres of land given him by his father, which he has since increased to 190 acres, 150 acres of which are under cultivation. In politics he is a Republican, and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. His wife is a member of the Church of God. Minerva, their eldest daughter, was married November 5, 1885, to Frank Miller.

WILLIAM R. NEERIEMER, blacksmith, of Odon, Ind., is a native of Ohio, born June 10, 1854, son of David P. and Martha (McCoy) Neeriemer. The father was of German descent, born in Ohio in 1819, a tailor by trade. His marriage occurred in 1845, and he lived in different parts of the " Buckeye State " until 1867, when he came to Daviess County, Ind., and located near Odon, where he now resides. The mother was of Scotch-Irish descent, born in Ohio August 1, 1828. At the early age of eleven years our subject began working for himself as a farm laborer, receiving $2.50 per month for his services. After coming to Daviess County he did farm work until 1872, when he began working at the blacksmith's trade with Dunlap & McCoy in Odon. He worked for them two years, and then worked in Illinois and in Odon for other parties for about two years longer. In 1876 he established himself in business in Odon on his own responsibility. He is a very skillful workman, and, owing to the large amount of work be is called upon to execute, he employs a blacksmith and wagon-maker to assist him. In politics he is a Republican, and cast his first vote for Rutherford B. Hayes. October 18, 1875, he married Sarah, daughter of Reuben and Julia Ann Harman. Mrs. Neeriemer was born in Ohio September 29, 1855. They have five children: Hugh, Frank, Almeda, Ismay and Martin.

CALEB E. ODELL, brick-maker and contracter, of Odon, Ind., was born September 22, 1848, in Daviess County, Ind., son of Emsley and Sarah A. (Scott) Odell (mention of whom is made elsewhere). Caleb attended the district school near home, and in 1873 entered the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute, and remained until he nearly finished the full course, attending about six terms. At the age of twenty he began teaching school, and continued that work for eight years. He was highly successful, and was for three years principal of the high school at Odon, Ind. October 7, 1876, he wedded Mary M. Blough, daughter of Joseph and Mary A. Blough. Mrs. Odell was born in Ohio in 1855. To their union three children were born, two of whom are living: Letha, Grace and Raymond Clyde. In the spring of 1876 Mr. Odell entered into partnership with his brother Alexander in the general merchandise store in Odon. During the first two years of their partnership he also taught school. They continued together until 1884, when they disposed of their goods. In the fall of that year subject began manufacturing brick and taking contracts for building houses. In 1884 Mr. Odell manufactured 250,000 brick, and 175,000 in the summer of 1885. He is one of the wide-awake business men of the village, and is doing well financially. In politics he is a Republican, and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. In 1878 he was elected trustee of Madison Township, and served four years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His wife is a member of the United Brethren Church.

ALEXANDER ODELL is a son of Emsley and Sarah (Scott) Odell, who were natives of North. Carolina and Kentucky, born in 1806 and 1813, respectively. The father went to Kentucky in his youth, and about 1828 went to Lawrence County, Lad. He was married in 1830, and kept hotel in Springville for about three years. In 1840 he came to Daviess County, Ind., where he owned at one time 120 acres of land. He died February 12, 1868. The mother is now residing with her children. Subject was born September 22, 1848, in Daviess County, and made his home with his parents until twenty-six years of age.. He attended the district schools, and in addition attended the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute for one term. When twenty years of age he began teaching and followed that occupation very successfully for six years. December 10, 1874, he married Mary F., daughter of William and Julia Ballou. She is a native of Daviess County, Ind., born June 22, 1858. To their union five children were born, three of whom survive: Edgar, Fannie and Harry. After marriage Mr. Odell farmed the old homestead one year, then moved to Odon and began keeping a general merchandise store, with his brother Caleb as partner.. They worked together eight years and then disposed of their stock in the spring of 1885. Since that time subject has clerked in C. L. Pierson's merchandise store. Mr. Odell is a very energetic young man, and in politics is a Republican, and was commissioned postmaster of Odon in 1877 and held the position five years, and was re-commissioned in 1884 and held the office until October, 1885. He is a Mason, and is tolerably well to do financially.

REZIA OVERTON was born in Daviess County,, Lid., January 25, 1850, son of Moses and Susan (Fletcher) Overton. The father was born in North Carolina in 1808. He moved to Tennessee in his youth and there married, about 1830. His wife died five years later, and in 1836 he married our subject's mother. In 1839 they moved to Lawrence County, Ind., and lived one year, and then came to Daviess County in 1840, where he became the possessor of 660 acres of land, being one of the largest landholders in Madison Township. He died May 20, 1883. The mother was born in Tennessee in 1811, and died in August, 1877. Our subject, Rezia Overton, attended the district schools in boyhood, and made his home with his people until he attained his majority. February 2, 1871, he wedded Phoebe Ann Chesnut, born in Daviess County, Ind., January 4, 1854, daughter of Julius and Rosa Ann Chesnut. To their marriage seven children were born, six of whom are living, named John A., William J., Rosa M.,James M., Rezia E. and Frederick B. Mr. Overton began his married life as a farmer on 100 acres of land given him by his father, and where he has since resided. He now owns 120 acres of land. He is a Republican and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. He is a Mason, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

ELIJAH S. PERSHING, teacher and farmer, of Daviess County, Ind., was born February 2, 1849, in Ohio. He is the eldest of eleven children born to Solomon and Magdaline (Resler) Pershing. The father is of German and Irish -descent, born. March 9, 1824, in the "Buckeye State." After his marriage, which occurred in 1846, he resided in his native State until 1863, when he sold out and came to Daviess County, Ind., and bought 160 acres of land, and at one time owned 205 acres. He is yet living but has retired from active life, and is now living with his daughter Susan in Odon. The mother was of German-Scotch descent, born in Pennsylvania in 1827. She died November 5, 1882. Subject obtained his education in the district schools of Daviess County, and in addition attended the graded schools of Dover, Ohio, and Raglesville and Liberty, Ind., for one year. When eighteen years old he began teaching school, and has followed that occupation nearly ever since. He is spoken of as one of the ablest and most successful instructors in the township, and is a thorough scholar and gentleman. December 9, 1869, he wedded Sarah, daughter of George C. and Susan Winklepleck. Mrs Pershing was born August 13, 1849, in Ohio. They are the parents of these eight children: Mary L, Emma J., Jonas E., Charles A., Roland G., John D., Susan E. and Solomon E. After Mr. Pershing's marriage he made several changes of residence, but now owns eighty acres of land in Madison Township. He is a Republican and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and his *wife of the United Brethren Church.

ELDER WILLIAM E. RITTER, minister and farmer, was born in Indiana April 7, 1836, son of John L. and Jane (Fate) Ritter, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee. The father followed the millwright's business and also farmed to some extent. About 1820 he came to Indiana, and after residing here a number of years moved to Texas, where he died in 1859. The mother died in 1836, when our subject was only a few days old. He was taken to raise by William Moore, with whom he lived until. twenty-five years old, and received his education in the subscription and free schools. September 18, 1856, he married Cecelia A., daughter of John and Rachael (Raney) Hastings. Mrs. Ritter was born January 3, 1836, in Indiana. They have two children: Eliza Ellen (widow of Samuel Guthrie) and John William. After his marriage Mr. Ritter lived with Mr. Moore four years, and then located on an eighty-acre tract, given him by Mr. Moore. By his energy and good management he now owns 240 acres of land on which are erected good buildings He is a Republican and cast his first vote for Lincoln. He and his wife are members of the Church of Christ. He was ordained elder of said church in 1864, and in 1878 was ordained evangelist, and has since been preaching the doctrines of that church. He is a true Christian, and a gentleman in the truest sense of the word.

WILLIAM SENEFF was born in Fayette County, Penn., December 20, 1831, and is one of eleven children born to Daniel and Susannah (Barnett) Seneff, who were born in Pennsylvania in 1799 and 1806, and died in 1878 and 1881, respectively. They were of German descent, and the father was a farmer. At the time of his marriage, in 1826, he lived in his native State. They moved to Ohio in 1846, and in 1863 came to Daviess County, Ind., where he purchased 154 acres of land, and lived about seven years. He then sold out to his son William, and purchased 140 acres in Bogard Township, and lived there until his death. Our subject attended school about three months during his life, and resided with his parents until twenty-two years of age. October 27, 1853, he wedded Ann Fisher, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Crits) Fisher. Mrs. Seneff was born October 22, 1835, in Ohio. To this union these children were born: John H., Sarah A., Daniel W., George E., Mary E. (who was murdered near Philadelphia, Ohio, May 14, 1880, by Ellen A. Athey. The trial lasted fifteen days, and the verdict of the jury was "imprisonment for life"), Susan N., Lydia E., Ida M., Claranetta (deceased), Emma A., Mertie L. and Aida L. John is living near Shoals, Ind., farming; George is in the regular army. Mr. Seneff lived in Ohio for ten years after his marriage. He came to Daviess County, Ind., in 1863, and began farming. In 1884 he built a fine two-story dwelling-house, one of the best in the township, and has his farm well improved otherwise. In politics he is a Republican and cast his first vote for John C. Fremont. He and wife are members of the United Brethren Church.

HARVEY SMILEY, brick and drain tile manufacturer, of Odon, Ind., was born November 22, 1833, in Ohio, and is one of seven children of William and Elizabeth (Swighart) Smiley. The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1800, a farmer and blacksmith by profession. He moved to the "Buckeye State" in his youth, and made his home in Tuscarawas County, where he died in 1848. The mother was of German descent, born about 1807. She is yet living. Our subject's boyhood days were spent on the farm, and in obtaining such education as the district schools afforded. May 22, 1856, he wedded Catharine, daughter of Joseph and Margaret Crout. Mrs. Smiley was born in Pennsylvania February 10, 1836, and became the mother of six children, three of whom are deceased. Those living are Milo, Evalena and William. Soon after his marriage Mr. Smiley purchased fifty-four acres of land in his native county, and began farming. In 1862 he sold this and bought a tanyard in Dundee, Ohio, where he worked two years, meeting with good. success. In 1864 he sold his property and came to Daviess County, Ind., and built a tanyard in Odon, continuing fifteen years. He then returned to agricultural pursuits, and was a tiller of the soil about eight years. In the spring of 1884 he turned his attention to manufacturing brick, and in 1885 also began making tile, taking his son Milo in as equal partner. They do an extensive and paying business. They are enterprising business men, and although the establishment is new, they are doing well financially. In politics Mr. Smiley is a Democrat and cast his first vote for James Buchanan. He and wife are members of the United Brethren Church.

JOHN V. SMITH, editor of the Prairie Scorcher, of Odon, Ind., was born November 7, 1831, in Lawrence County, Ind., near Bedford. He is one of a family of three sons and six daughters of Peter and Margaret (Ford) Smith. John attended the district schools about three months during the year, and remained at home with his parents as long as he remained single. July 24, 1851, he wedded Susan A. Collins, daughter of Samuel Collins. Mrs. Smith was born in Monroe County, Ind., about 1831. To their union nine children were born, all of whom are deceased. During the war Mr. Smith became one of the "boys in blue," enlisting in Company I, One Hundred and Twentieth Indiana Infantry, in 1864, for three years, or during the war. He participated in the Atlanta campaign, and numerous minor engagements. He remained in the field until hostilities ceased, receiving his discharge in 1866. He then came to Daviess County, and located in Clarksburg, now Odon, and began life as a merchant. Two years later he was burnt out, and he then began selling drugs, continuing for about the same length of time. In 1873 he combined his drug store with George Barber's dry goods store, the firm being known as J. V. Smith & Co. In connection with his store Mr. Smith established the newspaper called the Clarksburg Spy, and continued its publication until 1877. The same year he disposed of his store and moved his pi ess to Bedford, Ind., where he resolved to devote his entire time to editorial work. He published the Bedford Journal for seven years with good success. In 1884 he sold his entire interest, and soon after purchased the Mitchell Commêrcial, assuming control as editor and proprietor,which position he now holds. In the fall of 1885 he established the Prairie Scorcher, and is meeting with the best of success. He is a Republican in politics and cast his first vote for Fillmore. He was appointed postmaster of Clarksburg by U. S. Grant, and served in that capacity for several years. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the G. A. R. He and wife are members of the Christian Church, and he is highly respected by all classes.

DANIEL J. SMITH, M. D., of Odon, Incl., was born in Lawrence County, Ind., May 13, 1829, and is one of nine children born to Peter and Margaret (Ford) Smith. The father was a German by birth, born in Kentucky. He was a farmer and came to Indiana about 1828, and located on a 160-acre farm in Indian Creek Township, Lawrence County. He soon afterward traded this farm for 160 acres near Bedford. He was a successful farmer, and owned at the time of his death 500 acres of land. He died in the spring of 1849. The mother was born in the State of Tennessee. After her husband's death she made her home with her children until her death. Subject remained at home and received his education in the district schools. At the early age of seventeen, on March 11, 1847, he married Catharine Woody, daughter of Robert and Mourner Woody. She was born February 13, 1829. They became the parents of seven children, three of whom are living: Sarah Jane (wife of Capt. Z. V. Garten), Mary E. (wife of John Smiley), and Margaret E. (wife of John Crooke). Mrs. Smith was intelligent and well educated and her husband perceived the advantages of a good. education, and accordingly received instruction from his wife and attended school a few terms. He learned very rapidly and at the age of twenty years entered the teacher's profession. About 1850 he commenced working at the carpenter's trade, at which he continued about eight years. In 1859 he began the study of medicine under Dr. E. E. Rose. At the end of one year he took a course of lectures at the Eclectic Medical College at Cincinnati, Ohio, and after completing his course commenced practicing his profession at Fayetteville, Ind., where he remained two years. August 1, 1861, he came to Clarksburg, now Odon, where he resumed his practice and has since resided. Dr. Smith lost his wife October 14, 1870,and May 14, 1871, he wedded Sarah J. Clinton, daughter of Henry and Delphia Clinton. Mrs Smith was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1839. To their union two children were born, one of whom is living, Arnley. His second wife died March 1, 1881, and October 3 of the same year he married Mrs. Catharine (Stoy) Crater, daughter of Rev. John and Sophronia Stoy, born December 25, 1844, in Ohio. Dr. Smith has been a resident of Odon twenty-four years, where, by his thorough knowledge of his profession, he has built up an extensive and paying practice. He graduated at the Medical College at Cincinnati in 1866. In politics he is independent. He is a member of the Christian Church, but is an Evolutionist in belief. He was for some time justice of the peace in Lawrence County, and was elected in 1880 to the Greenback National Convention at Chicago.

ROBERT D. STOTTS is a son of John L. and Elizabeth E. (Laughlin) Stotts, born in Daviess County, Ind., August 18, 1851. The father was of Scotch descent, born December 11, 1820, a teacher by profession. Soon after his marriage he came to Daviess County, where he purchased 240 acres of land. During the Rebellion he enlisted in Company G, Twenty-eighth Indiana Infantry, February, 1864, and during his stay in the field was taken sick at Ringgold, Ga., died February 9, 1865, and was hurried at that place. The mother was of Irish lineage, born in Lawrence County, Ind., January 26, 1826. They were married in 1843 and came to this county in 1846. Since her husband's death she has lived with her son, Joseph, on the old place. Our subject attended the district schools and the high school at Dover Hill, in Martin County, and attended the Indiana Normal School at Mitchell, Ind., for one term. At the early age of seventeen he began teaching school, and has followed that occupation during the winter months ever since with the exception of one term, and is considered one of the best teachers in the county. October 19, 1871, he married Eliza J. Phipps, daughter of Benjamin and Mary H. Phipps. She was born in Daviess County March 3, 1851. They have three children, named Alva E., Zeta M. and John B. After marriage Mr. Stotts located on the old home place, where he yet resides and owns eighty-three acres of land. In politics he is a Republican and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. He and wife are church members.

PHILIP S. WARD was born in Ohio September 2, 1830, and is one of eight children born to Jesse and Rachael (Shplor) Ward, who were of German descent, born in 1797 and 1802, respectively, in Pennsylvania. The father was a carpenter, but later in life became a farmer. They were married in their native State in 1821, and moved to Ohio about 1826. At the time of his death, January 22, 1864, he owned 160 acres of land. He was married three times and was the father of twelve children. The mother died March 12, 1832. Subject attended the common schools, and when twenty-one began working at the carpenter's trade and continued at that occupation about six years. January 22, 1855, he married Margaret Fry, daughter of Moses and Catherine (Bash) Fry. Mrs. Ward was born in Ohio September 15, 1838. To Mr. and Mrs. Ward these children were born: Jesse F., Henry W., John A., Corad B., Charles F. and Edwin B. (twins), and Arthur A. In 1852 Mr. Ward came to Daviess County, Ind., and entered 120 acres of land. In 1856 he sold out and bought forty acres where he now resides. In September, 1864, he was drafted in Company H, Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry, for one year or during the war. He was in the Atlanta campaign, and received his discharge at Indianapolis, Ind., in July, 1865. He has been an industrious farmer, and now owns 594 acres of excellent and well-improved land, besides giving his boys eighty acres. In politics he is a Republican and cast his first vote for James Buchanan.

LEONARD C. WARD was born in Holmes County, Ohio, May 21, 1835, and is a son of Jesse and Rachael (Shplor) Ward. His boyhood days were spent on the farm and in attending school. When twenty-three years old he began doing for himself, and in March, 1859, he married Barbara Shutt, a native of Ohio, born December 4, 1838, daughter of John and Susan Shutt. Mr. and Mrs. Ward became the parents of these children: Olivia, Mary E., Susan B., Harvey E., Lavina and Maggie. Mr. Ward resided in his native State two years after marriage, and in 1861 came to Daviess County, Ind. He owned 150 acres of land in Greene County, Ind., which he traded for eighty-two acres in Daviess County. Two years later he purchased part of his present farm of 250 acres. In 1864 he was drafted in Company H, Thirty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He was in the battle of Nashville. He received his discharge at Indianapolis, Ind., in 1865. After his return he resumed his work on the farm. He has a beautiful residence, and a good substantial barn and granaries. In politics he is a Republican, but cast his first vote for James Buchanan. He and wife are members of the United Brethren Church.

HARRISON TOWNSHIP.

REASON S. CHAPMAN, a pioneer of Daviess County, Ind., a representative farmer and stock raiser of Harrison Township, is a native of Ohio, born near Cincinnati, February 3, 1814, son of Elijah and Elizabeth (Miller) Chapman. The family, who are of English-Dutch origin, came to Indiana in 1818. The father died in New Orleans about 1821. The mother was twice married, and died near Glendale, in 1831, in her eighty-fourth year. Subject grew to manhood in what was then an almost unbroken wilderness. He attended the early subscription schools, and later located on a farm near Glendale. where he continued to reside until 1880, when he moved to his present place of residence in Harrison Township, where he owns 290 acres of land. He has been married three times; the first time, in 1823, to Polly Baldwin, who bore him nine children, six of whom are living. After fifteen years of wedded life Mrs. Chapman died. Mr. Chapman then married Caroline Lashley, who died in February, 1880, leaving four children. The following April Mr. Chapman took for his third wife Mrs. Lucy A. (Cook) Wilson, a native of Ohio, born in 1835, daughter of George and Elizabeth Cook. Mr. Chapman is a firm Republican. • He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and has been for more than twenty years a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.


CAPT. JOHN W. CLARK (deceased) was born in Washington, Daviess Co., Ind., August 6, 1832, and is a son of John W. and Catherine Clark, who were born in 1806 and died in 1863 and 1848 respectively. They came to Indiana at an early day, and were among the first settlers of Harrison Township. Subject obtained his education in the common schools, and in 1861 enlisted in Company D, Eightieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was afterward commissioned captain in that regiment. By the explosion of a shell at Resaca, he was disabled and compelled to resign his command.. He was a gallant officer and a true and brave soldier. In early life he learned the carpenter's trade, and followed that occupation almost exclusively through life. At the time of his death he owned eighty-five acres of land near Glendale. March 15, 1855, he married Sarah E. Steen, who bore him one child, named Benjamin W. Mrs Clark died in 1856, and in 1867 Mr. Clark took for his second wife Eliza C. Wise, a native of Daviess County, born in 1849. To their marriage these four children were born: Ephraim T., born in 1868; Carrie D., born in 1870; John M., born in 1873, and Harlan T., born in 1884. In politics he was a stanch Republican, and was for many years a Mason. He was noted for his charity and for his many sterling virtues. His death, which occurred October 16, 1885, was the result of rheumatism contracted in the army. At the time of his death he was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mrs. Clark is a woman of much intelligence, and a kind and accommodating neighbor.

JACOB W. CLARK, M. D., was born in the township where he now resides February 12, 1842, son of John W. and Catherine Clark, and is of German-Irish origin. He is the sixth of a family of ten children, and spent his boyhood days on a farm and in attending the common schools in his neighborhood. He began the study of medicine at Glendale under Dr. John S. Mitchell, a graduate of the Louisville Medical College. He attended lectures at the University of Louisville during the winters of 186869, and graduated in the winter of 1870. He then located at Glendale, where he has since resided. In July, 1877, he began the drug and dry goods business, continuing at that occupation until 1885, when he sold out to Dr. Ragsdale. Dr. Clark owns ninety-two acres of well-improved land. In 1874 he was married to Miss Lucinda J. Gillespie, a native of Benton County, Ind.., born in 1852. They have two children, viz.: Ethel B. and Larry L. Politically the Doctor is a member of the National party, and has taken an active part in the political affairs of the county. He was formerly a Republican, and cast his first vote for Lincoln. He joined the Masons in 1866, and the I. 0. 0. F. in 1874. He is a representative of one of the old families of Daviess County, and is one of its most prominent men.

HENRY C. CLARK, farmer, was born in Daviess County, Ind., June 6, 1845, son of John W. and Catharine Clark, and is of Irish lineage. (Mention is made of the parents' history elsewhere.) Subject remained at home until eighteen years old. He received a common school education, and enlisted in his country's cause, in 1864, in Company K, One Hundred and Forty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war, when he was honorably discharged. Returning from the service he engaged in farming, and now owns 100 acres of good land and is a successful farmer. He was married, November 22. 1868, to Miss Mary A. Robinson, a native of Daviess County. born in 1850. To their marriage two children were born, named Arthur B., born April 6, 1873, and Effie E., born February 23, 1880. Mrs. Clark died October 17, 1883, and March 5, 1884, Mr. Clark married Miss Nancy, daughter of John and Sallie Nash. She is a native of Benton County, Ky., born in August, 1855. In politics our subject is a Republican. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and his wife of the Presbyterian.

JESSE B. COLBERT, a pioneer farmer of Daviess County, Ind., was born May 30, 1822, son of Tolliver and Sarah (Miller) Colbert, and is of English extraction. His father was born in Virginia and his mother in Ohio. The Colberts came to what is now Daviess County, Ind in 1816. Tolliver Colbert was one of the first men in the county. He killed a bear on the tract of land now owned by our subject, and the old rifle he used is in the possession of the family and is kept as a relic of the primitive days of the county. Subject grew to manhood in Daviess County and attended the subscription schools in boyhood. When twenty years old he began farming for himself and has continued that occupation ever since. He was engaged in the general merchandise business in Epsom, Ind., for about three years. He owns a farm of eighty acres. In 1841 he took for his life companion Phoebe Brown, who died in 1843. In 1845 he wedded Winnie Gilley, who bore him twelve children, five of whom are living: Tolliver P., Viola J., Bettie G., Laura M. and George W. Mr. Colbert is a Republican, and has been justice of the peace and was trustee of the township under the old law. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and is one of the oldest native residents of the county.

ALEXANDER THOMPSON CONLEY, trustee of Harrison Township, dealer in general merchandise and farmer, is a native of Owen County, Ind., son of John and Elizabeth Conley, and was born January 7, 1835. The family are of Scotch-English descent. The father was born in North Carolina in 1798. His grandfather, William Conley, came to Lawrence County, Ind., in pioneer times, or about 1820. He was probate judge of Lawrence County for several years. He died in 1845. John Conley, our subject's father, came to Daviess County in 1856 and died in 1861. Alexander Conley came to Daviess County in 1855, and for four years worked for Elisha Hyatt. He owns a well-improved farm on which he located in 1860. In 1871 he engaged in the general merchandise business in Glendale, where he has since continued with good success. He is a Republican in politics and has held a number of positions of honor and trust in the township, but not undeservedly. He was elected trustee of Harrison Township in 1882, and was re-elected in 1884. He was elected over two men each time. His first majority was fifteen and the second seventeen. He made a very -trustworthy and efficient official and was the means of wholly clearing the township from debt, and filled the position with honor to himself and to the entire satisfaction of the people. He joined the I. 0. 0. F. in 1865 and the Masons in 1870. He was married in 1856 to Rosanna C. Greenwood, a native of Greene County, Ind., born in 1840, daughter of William and Sarah Greenwood. To Mr. and Mrs. Conley these children were born: Nancy A., Addie, Sarah E., John W., William, Clementine, Rolla J.,...Adah M. and Nellie R.

WASHINGTON COSBY is a representative of one of the pioneer families of Daviess County, Ind. He is commonly known as "Doc" Cosby, so called on account of being the seventh son of the family. He is of Scotch-German origin and was born February 24, 1825, son of Overton and Susannah (Ryser) Cosby. The father was born near Richmond, Va., in 1785, and the mother in what is now West Virginia in 1787. They were married in 1806 and came to Indiana about 1817, and located in Daviess County. Overton Cosby erected the first brick house in the township. It was built about one-half century ago and was only torn down in 1884. He and wife died in 1859. Our subject was reared on a farm and attended the early schools. He remained at home assisting his father on the farm until twenty-one years of age, when he began farming for himself. He owns 130 acres of land and since 1850 has resided where he now lives. For some years he has given considerable attention to bee culture and owns about thirty, stands. He was married, in 1850, to Martha J. Thomas, a native of Daviess County, born in 1830. Of five children born to them only two survive: Ziba and Grandison T.In politics Mr. Cosby was formerly a Whig, now a stanch Rep. He became a Mason in 1859. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

CLARINGTON G. CROSS, farmer, was born in Fleming County; Ky., April 30, 1823, son of John and Mary (Johnson) Cross, and is of German descent, the fifth in a family of eleven children. His father was born in Tennessee and his mother in Virginia. In 1826 the family came to Daviess County, Ind. The father died in Pike County, Ind., at about thirty years of age. The mother died in Daviess County. Subject was reared on a farm and attended the subscription schools. When about eighteen years of age he began working for himself by the month ; this he continued until twenty-seven years old, when he began farming for himself. He settled on his present farm in 1852, and now owns 250 acres of well-improved land. He was married, in 1849, to Miss Eliza E. Small, a native of Kentucky. To their marriage three children were born, two of whom are yet living, viz.: Frank, born in November, 1850, and Theodore, born in September, 1855. Mrs. Cross died in 1881. Mr. Cross is a Republican and is a charter member of the L 0. 0. F. Lodge of Glendale. He is a successful farmer and is one of the prominent men of the county.

WILLIAM DONNOLLY, farmer and stock raiser, is a native of Ireland, born January 6, 1805, son of Thomas and Catherine (Redman) Donnolly, who were also born in the "Emerald Isle." When our subject was about fifteen years old he left his native land and went to Canada, where he remained two years. He then came to the United States, and after living an unsettled life for some time finally came to Daviess County, Ind., in 1836, and located where he now resides. He owns 190 acres of well-improved land, and is one of the principal farmers of Harrison Township. In 1834 he was married to Mary Molloy, by whom he had eleven children, four of whom survive their mother, who died in 1859, viz.: John, Dennis, Kate, and Peter. Mr. Donnolly married, in 1874, Mrs. Mary (Treanor) Crosby, born October 5, 1829, daughter of James and Catherine Treanor. Mrs. Donnolly came to Daviess County, Ind., in 1840. The family are all members of St. Patrick's Catholic Church, of which Mr. Donnolly was one of the principal fouhders. He is a prominent and worthy citizen, and the family are highly respected.

A. M. JOHNSON was born near where he now lives March 28, 1829, and is a son of Hiram M. and Maria (Martin) Johnson, who were born in Kentucky, the former in 1802, and the latter in 1805. The Johnson family came to Daviess County, Ind., about 1822, and located in Harrison Township. Our subject's father died in Daviess County in 1872. The mother yet lives, and resides with our subject. Subject attended the common schools and resided with and aided his father until twenty-four years of age, began when he bean doing for himself. In 1853 he located on a farm near his present place of abode, where he remained until 1864, when he moved to his present place of residence. He owns 299 acres of the best improved land in the county. He was married, in 1852, to Lydia Ann Davis, daughter of Abner M. Davis, who was a native Kentuckian, and for a number of years represented Daviess County in the General Assembly. Mrs. Johnson was born in Indiana in 1835. and bore her husband these two children: Henry S., born November 27, 1854, and died July 18, 1879, and Priscilla A., born January 1, 1858. They have two grandchildren, viz.: Henry P. Johnson and Harvey A. Caylor. Formerly Mr. Johnson was a Democrat, but later became a Republican and an uncompromising Abolitionist. After the election of R. B. Hayes to the presidency he became a National, and has since been identified with that party. He is president of the County Central Committee, and is considered one of the first men of the county. Mrs Johnson is a member of the Christian Church. Her mother's maiden name was Priscilla Kirk.

WILLIAM W. JONES was born in Daviess County, Ind., August 4, 1832, son of Joseph and Hannah (Johnson) Jones. The family are of Welsh descent. The father was born near Charleston, S. C., in 1801, and the mother in Kentucky, in 1798. They both died. in this county, the father in 1866, and the mother in 1862. Joseph Jones came to what is now Daviess County in 1816 with his father, who was also a native Carolinian and a slave-holder in that State. He died in Daviess County in 1840. William W., our subject, attended the common schools and farmed until 1864, when he enlisted in Company E., Forty-fourth Indiana Volunteer •Infantry, and served about one year, when he was honorably discharged. He had a brother in the late war who was shot at the battle of Cedar Mountain, and died there. After his return from the army Mr. Jones resumed farming, and now owns 300 acres of .good land. In 1852 he was married to Eliza Collins, a native of Knox County, Ind., born in 1832. They became the parents of thirteen children, five whom are living: Franklin S., Lydia 0., Hannah M., Milton C. and Mason R. Two sons were accidentally drowned in the White River while bathing July 9, 1884. Mr. Jones is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

JAMES LAMB, farmer and stock raiser, is a native of Daviess County, Ind., born September 3, 1838, son of Edward and Catherine (Bradley) Lamb, who were born in the "Emerald Isle" in 1811 and 1822, respectively. The paternal grandfather, James Lamb, was also Irish, and lived and died in his native land. The family came to America about 1832, and resided two years in New York and then came to Indiana, locating in Daviess County, where they still reside. Subject attended the subscription schools of early days, and when twenty-three years old began working for himself. For some years he worked at the cooper's trade, but settled on a farm in 1863. He owns 400 acres of good land, and is one of the leading farmers of Harrison Township. February 3, 1863, he led to the hymeneal altar Miss Ellen Cussack, born in Indiana in 1839, daughter of Nicholas Cussack. To their union these two children were born: Edward, born in June, 1869, and Thomas F., born in 1873. Mr. Lamb is a Democrat, and an enterprising and public-spirited man, and an honorable citizen. The family are members of the St. Patrick's Catholic Church.

FENWICK McCAFFERTY is a native of Harrison Township, Daviess Co., Ind., born May 12, 1829, son of Thomas and Catherine (Palmer) McCafferty, who were born in South Carolina, the father being of Irish lineage. They came to Daviess County, Ind., about 1809, and settled in what is now Harrison Township. The father was a soldier in the war of 1812. Both parents died in this county. Subject spent his boyhood days on a farm, and when twenty-one years old began working for himself. About twenty-four years ago he located on his present farm, which is moderately well improved, and is about two miles west of Glendale. At intervals for the last twelve years he has clerked in the store of A. T. Conley, at Glendale. He is in every sense of the word a self-made man, and has battled his own way through life. He received a common school education, and takes much interest in the education and welfare of his children. He is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Pierce. He has held the office of assessor of Harrison Township, and was justice of the peace for three years. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and in 1855 was married to Miss Anis Gilley, a native of Daviess County. To them were born these four children: Mary C., Franklin L., Elizabeth J. and Tillman R.

JAMES PORTER, JR., is a son of James W. and Ann (McCoy) Porter, and was born in Daviess County, Ind., May 3, 1845, of Scotch-Irish descent. His father was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, in 1814, and his mother in Virginia in 1813. They came to Daviess County in 1838, and located in Reeve Township. Subject lived with his parents until twenty-one years old, when he began life for himself. He tilled his father's farm for three years, and then purchased a farm in the southern part of the county, on White River, remaining there until 1877, when he purchased and located on his present farm. He owns 640 acres of good land, of which 540 acres are in a fine state of cultivation. In 1869 be began buying and selling stock, and raises a great many short-horn cattle. In August, 1863, he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served nine months. He was honorably discharged in 1864. In September, 1874, Mr. Porter married Judith Lemmon, a native of Dubois County, Ind., born March 5, 1851, daughter of Elijah and Elizabeth Lemmon. Two children blessed their union: Artie, born in 1878, and Clara, born in 1880. Mr. Porter is a Republican, and joined the Masons in 1872. He is the largest land owner and heaviest tax payer in Harrison Township, and is one of the most esteemed and respected citizens of the county. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

REV. MARION PORTER is a son of James W. and Ann (McCoy) Porter (elsewhere written), and was born in Reeve Township, Daviess Co., Ind., January 22, 1850. He is the seventh of the family, and grew to manhood on the farm. At the age of twenty-one he began working for himself. He was educated in the common school, and attended one term of school at Washington, Ind. The greater part of his education has been obtained through self exertion. He began teaching school in Reeve Township, and has taught every winter, with the exception of one, since 1869. He has met with excellent success, and is considered one of the best teachers in the county. In 1875 he purchased his present farm of 160 acres, where he lived until 1885, when he rented his farm and moved to Harrison Township, where he now resides. October 30, 1873, he was married to Laura Jackson, a native of Reeve Township, born December 2, 1851. They have two children: Inez G., born in 1874, and Amy M., born in 1879. Mr. Porter and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and August 9, 1884, he was or-dained a minister of that denomination. He is a Republican, and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant.


DR. MARK H. RAGSDALE is of Scotch-English descent, born in Harrison Township, Daviess Co., Ind., August 26, 1836, son of John and Elizabeth (Palmer) Ragsdale, and is the fourth of their eight children. His parents were born in South Carolina in 1802, the former in November and the latter in August. The family located in what was then the Northwest Territory, but what is now Daviess County, Ind., in 1811. Here the grandparents of our subject died. The Doctor's father died in 1848, and his mother in 1874. The family were among the pioneers of the county. Subject was reared on a farm, where he remained until 1857, when he began the battle of life for himself. In 1864 he enlisted in Company I, Forty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served one year. He began the study of medicine in 1871, under Jacob W. Clark, M. D., of Glendale, and attended medical lectures at the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, and began the practice of his profession in the spring of 1875 at Algiers, Pike Co., Ind. After a one-year's practice in that place he located in Otwell, the same county, remaining five years. He then came to Glendale, where he has continued to practice his profession ever since. In September, 1885, he engaged in the drug and dry goods business at that place. He has been a very successful physician, and is a National in politics. He was married, February 22, 1866, to Harriet P. Chappell, who bore him these two children: Francis A., born in 1866, and Arsulla E., born in 1881. Mrs. Ragsdale is a native of Daviess County, born in 1845, and is a daughter of Elliott Chappell, who was a pioneer of the county.

P. H. RAGSDALE is a son of John and Elizabeth (Palmer) Ragsdale (elsewhere written), and was born in Daviess County, Ind., near Hudsonville, October 26, 1839. He ig the sixth in the family, and was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. He remained at home, aiding his parents on the farm, until the breaking out of the war in 1861, when he enlisted in Company G, Forty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, for three years or during the war. He was so severely wounded at the battle of Perryville that he was unable to attend to his duties, and was honorably discharged February 28, 1863. Since that time he has followed agricultural pursuits, and in 1879 located on his present farm of 150 acres, where he has met with good success. September 8, 1864, he was married to Miss Melvina Combs, a native of Illinois, born December 18, 1839. To them were born these five children: Tolman R., Denby H., Arla May,Aden H. and Ira H. Mr. Ragsdale was formerly a Democrat in politics, but is now a radical member of the National party. He and. wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

REUBEN ROBINSON is a native of Daviess County, Ind., born December 31, 1844, son of Elijah G. and Lucretia (Sanford) Robinson, and is of Irish origin. He is the eldest in a family of seven children. His father was born in Kentucky in 1816, and his mother in the same State in 1818. His paternal grandfather was Elijah Robinson, a native Virginian, who immigrated to Kentucky in early life, and from there came to Indiana and located in Daviess County. He died here in 1845. Our subject's father died in Harrison Township, in December, 1879. Subject was reared on a farm. and attended the common schools. He began teaching the " young idea" in 1863, and continued that occupation eight years, meeting with good success. Later in life he gave his attention to agricultural pursuits. In 1874 he settled on his present farm of 100 acres. He was married, in 1869, to Miss Catherine Ax, a native of the " Buckeye State," born in 1850. To their union six children were born, four of whom are living: John W., Ada, Lattie L. and Lydia. In politics Mr. Robinson is a Democrat. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

HAMLET ROBINSON is a native of Daviess County, Ind., where he was born July 11, 1846, son of Elijah and Lucretia (Sanford) Robinson. He grew to manhood on the farm, and in early childhood 'removed with his parents to Harrison Township, and attended the public schools. After attaining his majority he began working for himself, and has always followed the life of a farmer with the exception of four years. He settled on his present farm in 1872. He owns 161 acres of good and well-improved land. He has a fine residence and a good barn. In 1868 he married Adelia A. Young, a native of the county, born in 1850. They have seven children, as follows: Edwin, Flora, Ephraim, Stella, Frank, Amy M. and John. Prior to 1876 Mr. Robinson was a Republican, but since that time he has been a true and ardent worker of the National party, and was one of the first men in the county to advocate the principles and doctrines of that party. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is, in every sense of the word, a self-made man, and one of the best known and most prominent citizens of the township.

C. J. SMOOT was born in Washington Township, Daviess Co., Ind., October 22, 1831, son of William P. and Elizabeth (Jett) Smoot. He is of Scotch-German descent, and is the second in a family of seven children. His parents were natives of Kentucky, and came to Daviess County about 1820. Subject spent his boyhood days on the farm and in attending the subscription and public schools. When about sixteen years of age he began learning the plasterer's trade, and followed that occupation for twenty years. In 1861 he enlisted in Company A, Fifty-second Indiana Volunteers, for three years. He re-enlisted at Canton, Miss., and was in the battles of Fort Donelson, Nashville, Mobile and many minor engagements. He was honorably discharged in 1865. In 1871 he settled on his present farm of 211 acres of well-improved land, and in 1879 erected one of the finest houses in the township. In October, 1855, he was married to Miss Rachel L., daughter of Job Martin, born in Wayne County, Ky., in 1836. To their union ten children were born, seven of whom are living: John T., Jemima, Elizabeth, Ida M., William P., Harley A. and Laura E. In politics Mr. Smoot was formerly a Republican, but is now a National. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

WARNER G. SMOOT, farmer, is a native of Daviess County, born August 28, 1833, son of William P. and Elizabeth (Jett) Smoot, and grandson of Clayborn Smoot, who was a Virginian, and immigrated to Kentucky in the pioneer days of that State. The family came to Indiana about 1820. The father of our subject came to Daviess County in 1826, and located in Washington Township. His death took place July 22, 1872. Subject grew to manhood on a farm, and received a common school education, and in addition attended the Indiana State University and Franklin College in Johnson County, Ind. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry for three months, and re-enlisted the same year in Company A, Fifty-second Indiana Infantry, and served until after the battle of Fort Pillow. He then returned home and assisted in organizing and recruiting a battery. This done he was transferred to the Eightieth Indiana Battery, and served until 1865. when he was honorably discharged. He was at Perryville, Knoxville, with Sherman at Atlanta, and participated in many minor engagements. He was commissioned first lieutenant in July, 1864, and was a true and brave soldier during the war. Returning from the field and scenes of war he began teaching school, continuing this until 1872, when he engaged in farming. He owns 131 acres of fine land. January 24, 1864, he married Lydia E. Robinson, born December 2, 1844. They have these five children: Emma J., Walter G., Richard B., Mary D., and Edwin R. In politics Mr. Smoot is an uncompromising Republican, and is a leader of that party in his township. He has been trustee of Harrison Township, and is a representative man of the county. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and his wife of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

BENJAMIN W. STEEN was born in South Carolina January 4, 1834, son of John C. and Phoebe (Gregory) Steen. and of German-Irish descent. The parents were born in South Carolina in 1805 and 1806, respectively. The father died in 1878, and the mother in 1850. The family came to Daviess County in 1837, and located in Harrison Township, where the parents died. Subject attended the subscription schools, and aided his father on the farm until twenty-one years of age, when he began for himself. He located on his present farm in 1855, and now owns 160 acres of well-improved land. He was married in 1855 to Martha R. Colbert, born January 18, 1834, in Harrison Township, daughter of Tolliver and Sarah Colbert. Mr. and Mrs. Steen have two children: Oliver B., born in 1857, and Luella, born in 1872. Oliver has been twice married; both wives are deceased. He has two children: Emma by his first wife, and Leona by the second. Leona now resides with our subject. Mr. Steen is a Republican in politics, and has served two years as trustee of Harrison Township. Both husband and wife are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Steen is a valuable citizen of the county, and is the soul of integrity. Mrs. Steen's parents were born in 1789 and 1796, respectively. The former was a native of Virginia.

STEPHEN STEPHENSON, plasterer and farmer, was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, November 18, 1829, son of Peter and Jane (Crabbs) Stephenson, and is one of eleven children, and of Dutch-Welsh extraction. His father was born in Cape May County, N. J., in 1804, and the mother in Washington County, Penn., in 1807. The paternal grandfather was a native of Wales, and died in Hamilton County, Ohio. The family came to Daviess County, Ind., in April, 1839, and settled in Veal Township, where the father died in 1880. By occupation he was a cooper and farmer. He was an ultra-Abolitionist, and later became a stanch Republican. His wife died in 1884. Our immediate subject received a common school education, and his .early years were spent in learning the cooper's trade. Subsequently he learned the plasterer's trade, and this has been his principal calling through life. In 1865 he located on his present farm of 126 acres. Politically he is a thorough Democrat, and for many years has advocated the principles of that party. In 1884 he was chosen assessor of Harrison Township. He was married, in December 1852, to Miss Sarah Edwards, born in 1834, daughter of John and .Elizabeth Edwards. To their union five children were born: Seth, born in 1856; Jesse, who is a teacher in the Washington Public School, is taking a course at Du Pauw University, and was born in 1859; Lillie B., born in 1862; John, born in 1864, and Lizzie J., born in 1867. Mr. 'Stephenson joined the I. 0. 0. F. in 1862, and the Masons in 1865.

FRANCIS ASBURY WARD, Deputy United States Marshal for Indiana, and ex-sheriff of Daviess County, is a native of Knox County, born near the farm of the late Governor James D. Williams (who was an intimate friend of the father of our subject) in 1839, and is a son of Andrew and Lydia (Atchison) Ward. The Ward family were of Irish origin, and the father was a native of North Carolina, and came to Daviess County, Ind., in early times. He died in Harrison Township of that county in 1866, at fifty-six years of age. The mother died in 1843. Subject was educated in the public schools, and attended -the Evansville Commercial College, graduating from that institution in 1861. He then taught school for about nine terms, and was a successful pedagogue. He served about one year in the late war in Company I, Forty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He has a good farm of 172 acres in Harrison Township, and politically is a Democrat. In 1870 he was. elected trustee of the township, and subsequently served one term as deputy sheriff of Daviess County under Nathan G. Read. In 1880 he was elected sheriff of the county by a majority of fifty-eight, and was re-elected in 1882 with a majority of 280. He is one of the most popular and efficient officials the county has ever had, and has filled the duties of his office to the entire satisfaction of his constituents. In October 1885 he was appointed deputy-United States marshal for Indiana. He is a Mason, and a member of the I. 0. 0. F. He was married, in 1864, to Mrs. Mary E. Arthur, a native of the county, who has borne him seven children.

DR. GEORGE W. WILLEFORD is a native of Williamson County, Ill., born February 6, 1847, son of George A. and Minerva (Hogan) Willeford, and is of Welsh-Irish descent. His parents were born in Tennessee in 1804 and 1809, and died in Minos in 1876 and 1881, respectively. The boyhood of Dr. Willeford was spent on a farm. He attended the common schools, and began teaching the "young idea" in 1864, and continued that occupation four years, meeting with the best success. He began the study of medicine in 1866, under Dr. T. D. Ferguson, of Marion, Ill., and afterward attended lectures at the Chicago Medical College, graduating in 1874. He practiced five years before his graduation. He located in Glendale, Ind., where he has an extensive and lucrative practice. In 1882 he engaged in the drug and dry goods business, and in connection with his practice continues that occupation. He was appointed postmaster of Glendale in 1881, and held the office until 1885, when he was superseded by a Democrat. He was married in 1871 to Martha McClure, born in Knox County, Ind., in 1850. They have these five children: Otis, Cora, Nora, Ralph W. and an infant unnamed. Dr. Willeford is a member of the I. 0. 0. F.

MICHAEL ZINKAN, one of the leading farmers of Harrison Township, Daviess Co., Ind., and native of the same, was born April 4, 1842, son of Philip and Ann Barbara Zinkan, who were born in Germany. They came to the United States in 1832, and located in Daviess County, Lad., where they resided until their death. Subject obtained a common school education, and spent his boyhood days on a farm. He remained with his parents until twenty-six years of age, when he located on his present farm. He has 200 acres of good land, the most of which is in a fine state of cultivation. He engages quite extensively in stock raising, and is considered a prosperous and enterprising tiller of the soil. He has a fine barn, built in 1883. He was married in November, 1867, to Elizabeth Byrne, a native of Ireland, born in 1839, daughter of J. L. Byrne. She came to America when a child. Their union has been blessed with three children, viz. : Philip M., born October, 1868; Mary J., born May, 1873, and John J. A., born June, 1875. Mr. Zinkan is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for McClellan. In 1881 he was appointed to fill out the unexpired term of 0. B. Steen, as trustee of Harrison. The family are members of the Catholic Church.

REEVE TOWNSHIP.

JAMES P. ARVIN was born in Washington County, Ky., January 31, 1828, and is a son of Harry Arvin, born November 7, 1787, in Maryland. His grandfather, Edwin Arvin, was of Irish parentage. Mr. Arvin's mother was Theresa Montgomery, born in Maryland in 1787. Our subject lived on a farm in Kentucky with his parents until seventeen years of age, when they moved to Daviess County, Ind., settling near the eastern boundary. Here he lived until after attaining his majority. He then married Miss Mary Miles, daughter of Hillary and Frances (Clemmons) Miles, who were native Kentuckians. After Mr Arvin's marriage he began doing for himself, working on the neighboring farms. In 1850 he purchased forty acres of land where he now lives and owns 150 acres, 100 of which are under cultivation. They are the parents of two children: Theresa Elizabeth, born December 2, 1850, and Thomas Hillary, born October 24, 1852. Mr. Arvin is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Pierce. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812. The family are members of the Catholic Church.

W. DAILY BAKER, is a native Virginian, born October 1, 1848, one of twelve children born to Isaac Baker, who was also born in Virginia. The mother's maiden name was Bagnal, and she was born in North Carolina. Mr. Baker was reared in his birthplace, and learned the blacksmith's trade with his father. He attended the common schools and remained with his parents until twenty-two years of age. He then moved to his present place of abode. November 9, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss M. Alford, daughter of John W. and Margaret Alford. They became the parents of six children: Minnie A., William F., Rolla, Maggie, Clara B. and Hugh G. Mr. Baker cast his first presidential vote for Horace Greeley, and has always been identified with the Democratic party. He is a member in good standing of the I. 0. 0. F., and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. By hard work he has accumulated some valuable farming land, and in all respects he is a valuable citizen.

REV. CHARLES CURRAN, pastor of St. Patrick's Church, was born October 22, 1851, at Seneca Falls, N. Y. He is one of twelve children born to the marriage of Richard Curran and Catherine Maley, who were born in County Clare, Ireland, in 1801 and 1810, respectively. They were married in 1831 and lived in Ireland until there were ten children born to them. In 1849 they came to America. The father died in 1859. Our subject obtained his early education 'in the public schools of Seneca Falls. At the age of fourteen years he entered St. Bonaventures College at Allegany, N. Y., where he studied for the priesthood for one year. He then came. West and visited his brother, Rev. Daniel Curran, residing in Greensburg, Ind. He attended the St. Meinrad College, in Spencer County, Ind., for the completion of his education. He took a six years' course and was ordained a priest. June 19, 1881. After being ordained his first appointment was at Brightwood, a suburb of Indianapolis, and he became assistant pastor of the St. John's Church, Indianapolis proper. After having charge of this congregation for over two years, he was given charge of St. Martin's Church and was resident pastor of both of these congregations. About two years later he took charge of his present pastorate. He is a man of much ability and is much liked by his congregation.

JOHN FANNING was born September 8, 1843, and is a son of Thomas and Bridget (Riley) Fanning, who were born in Ireland in 1811 and 1810, respectively. Our subject was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and lived in that city until ten years of age. He then moved with his parents to Reeve Township, Daviess Co., Ind., and located on a farm, where he learned to be an expert tiller of the soil, and has followed that occupation since his father's death in April, 1871. The father owned 200 acres of land, and our subject has added 120 acres of land, on which he lives with his mother. He takes considerable interest in stock raising. He cast his first vote for McClellan, and has ever been a stanch Democrat. In April, 1878, he was elected trustee of the township, which office he held two years, and in 1882 to the office of county commissioner, and was re-elected in 1884 and still holds the position. He was one of the youngest men ever elected to this position. He is a Catholic, as are all his family. He belongs to the St. Patrick's Temperance Society, of which he is secretary. He is a good farmer and a worthy officeholder.

F. M. HEDRICK was born in Daviess County, Ind., March 16, 1842, and is the fourth of six children born to George F. Hedrick, who was a Kentuckian by birth, born in 1790. The mother was born in 1808. Mr. Hedrick was reared on a farm, where he remained until nineteen years of age. He secured a good common school education. In 1860 he purchased forty acres of land—which he has since increased to eighty—and commenced his career as a farmer. On the 4th of February, 1866, he was united in marriage to a Miss Ishem, daughter of Joel and Bettie (Scott) Ishem. They became the parents of these children: Laura Ann, Mary, Thomas, Albertie and Pearlie May. Mr Hedrick is a Democrat. On the 22d of September, 1864, he enlisted in Company F, Eighteenth Ohio Infantry, and was in the battle of Nashville. He was honorably discharged June 10, 1865, and returned home and resumed his duties on the farm. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. Mr Hedrick is sober, industrious and a worthy type of the self-made man,

E. C. HORNADAY is a native of Jackson County, Ind., born December 1, 1879, and is a son of Isaiah H. and Nancy (Thompson) Hornaday. The parents were natives of North Carolina, born in 1789 and 1796, respectively. Our subject re-, mained with his parents and assisted them on the farm until 1841, when he began working for himself. He rented land for two years and then purehased eighty acres of land. By his untiring industry he has increased his farm to 1,200 acres. He was married to Elizabeth, -daughter of Thomas and Catharine (Mathews) Meadows. They became the parents of these chil= dren: Mary, Thomas, Elizabeth C., Bell L., John K. and Benjamin. He was not a soldier in the late war, but rendered good service in raising troops and supplying money to aid the cause of the Union. He belongs to the Republican party and cast his first vote for Tan Buren. He takes some interest in local polities, but has never aspired to office. He and wife have been members of the Methodist Episcopal Church for about twenty years. He is one of the self-made men of the county, and has met with fair success in his business ventures.
THOMAS J. HORNADAY was born in Scott County, Ind., October 28, 1845, and is the second of eight children born to Eli and Elizabeth (Meadows) Hornaday. They are natives of Indiana and Kentucky, born, respectively, in 1819 and 1821. When our subject was but six years of age his parents moved to Washington County, Ind., and his early days were divided between attending the district schools and farming. He remained at home until the age of twenty, when he entered Asbury University at Greencastle, Ind., where he finished his education. He then returned home and continued farming. October 17, 1871, he was united in marriage to Mollie A., daughter of Rev. W. W. and Mira (Duncan) Puett, who were born in Monroe County. Mr. and Mrs. Hornaday became the parents of four children: Du Pauw, born in 1872; R. G., born in 1875; Orth L., born in 1880, and Mira B., born in 1882. Subject has always been a stanch Republican in politics, and takes considerable interest in the political affairs of his county. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since 1875, and is a charitable and generous contributor to all religious causes. He owns 214 acres of land, 110 of which are under cultivation.


P. A. HORRALL was born in Daviess County, Ind., November 23, 1827, son of Coleman C. and Lucinda (Lett) Horrall, natives of South Carolina, born in 1805. The father died in 1829, and the mother in 1882. Subject was reared in his native county, and received but little education. At sixteen years of age he started out in life for himself, and at the age of eighteen years began farming. September 11, 1848, he was united in marriage, and to their union these children were born: Priscilla, Precia, Lucinda, John C., Rachel, Sarah, Lovel, Randall, Hattie and Lillie. Subject has always been a stanch Republican, and his first presidential vote was cast for Harrison. He was not a soldier in the late war, although he applied three times, but was not admitted on account of deficiency in size. He was then made captain of the home guards. He is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Horrall's grandparents were natives of Ireland, and the father was a soldier in the war of the Revolution, and was one hundred years old at the time of his death. Mr. Horrall rented land for some years after his marriage, and after living in various parts of the county finally settled in Alfordsville, where he engaged in managing a flouring-mill. He owns eighty acres of land and some valuable town property in Alfordsville.

JOHN JONES was born in Ireland in the year 1809. He lived with his parents until fifteen years of age, when he began working for himself at farming. At the age of twenty-four he left his native isle and embarked for England, thinking to make it his home. He worked for about six months in a soap factory, and then took passage in a vessel sailing for America. May 31, 1832, they landed at Quebec, Canada. Here our subject resumed farming, and followed this occupation for about eighteen months. He then went to Oswego, N. Y., and worked on a farm near that town for about a year, and then came to Indiana, and then worked near Fort Wayne on a canal. After some time he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and shipped on board a flat-boat bound to New Orleans. After about eighteen months he returned to Indiana and worked in Jeffersonville, and then again returned to New Orleans the following fall. From that city he went to Mobile and worked on the Alabama River. The following April he went to Kentucky; thence to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he remained one month. He worked on the railroad for some time, then returned to New Orleans, and the following spring returned to Cincinnati. April 12, 1850, he was married to Ann Gallagher, a native of the Emerald Isle. She was born August 12, 1818, daug. later of Maurice and Ann (Patton) Gallagher. Mrs. Jones came to America with her brother Maurice in 1849. Several years after his marriage he moved to Daviess County, Ind., where he located and began farming. He owns 273 acres of land. Mr. and Jones have five children: Mary J., John, Ellen, Annie and William. Mr. Jones is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Catholic Church.

JAMES MAHAN was born in County Meade, Ireland, June 24, 1800. His parents, Thomas and Bridget (Riley) Mahan, were born in the same place as himself. The father died at the age of sixty and the mother at fifty-eight years of age. Mr. Mahan, our subject, lived in the old country until he was thirty-six years of age, when he went to Liverpool, England, and embarked for the United States on the sailing vessel " Wakefield." They reached New York June 8, 1838, and the same year went to New Jersey, where he worked on a farm a few days, when he went to Pennsylvania and worked on canals in that State for about a year, and then went to Madison, Ind., and worked for one year on the railroad. He then went to New Orleans, where he spent a few days, but not liking the South he returned and again worked on the railroad, continuing at this for some time. He soon came to Daviess County and entered the eighty-acre farm where he now lives. In 1839 he married Catharine Hart (daughter of James Hart), who died in 1842. In February, 1849, he married Mrs. Margaret (McDowell) Whiteface. To them were born these four children: Ellen, Catharine, Elizabeth and Thomas. Mrs. Mahan had five children by .her first marriage, named William, John, Mary Ann, Margaret and Sarah J. He has owned 160 acres of land, but deeded it to his son in 1885. He has always been a Democrat politically, and has been quite successful as a farmer and stock raiser.

J. A. McCORD is the tenth of eleven children, and was born March 6, 1824, son of William and Margaret (Allen) McCord. The father was a native of Pennsylvania. Our subject was born in Kentucky, where he lived with his mother until the age of fourteen years. He then removed to Daviess County, Ind., where he has since remained. He engaged in farming, which occupation he followed eighteen years. He obtained his education in the public schools, and was married, April 8, 1849, to Emily, daughter of James and Hannah (Baker) Alford. Mr McCord became the father of these fourteen children: Helen, Mason, Florian, Sarah, William, Benjamin, Margaret, Joseph,
Emily, George, Matthew, Clara, Orlena and Thomas. Mr. McCord is a stanch Republican, and cast his first vote for Taylor. He was elected township trustee in 1873. He has been postmaster of Alfordsville since 1861, with the exception of a short time. He has been a member of the Christian Church since 1865, and has raised his family in that belief. He owns 140 acres of land, and has a fine stock of general merchandise. He carries on farming and stock raising, and is the most prosperous merchant in his town.

DANIEL MURPHY was born in Reeve Township, Daviess Co., Ind., May 4, 1857, and is one of eleven children born to the marriage of Patrick Murphy and Mary Agan, who were born in " Old Ireland" in 1817 and 1825, respectively. The father came to America in 1840, and after his marriage settled in Daviess County, Ind., where the subject of this sketch was born. The father died June 11, 1874. Subject spent his boyhood days on a farm. He was married in October. 1877, to Miss Kate Mahan, born in Daviess County, in 1854, daughter of James and Margaret (Miller) Mahan. To their marriage these three children were born: Mary Margaret, born August 15, 1878; Patrick, born in December, 1880, and Lizzie, born August 17, 1883. Mr. Murphy belongs to the Democratiä party, but has never given his name for public patronage. He is a member of the St. Patrick's Temperance Society, joining in 1881. He is a Catholic in religious belief, his family being the same. He owns eighty acres of land, sixty-five acres being under cultivation.

JOHN ROARTY is one of nine children born to the marriage of John Roarty and Hannah Reddin. The parents were born in Ireland, the father in 1809. They came to America about 1832, and were married in New York City in 1837. Here our subject was born November 12, 1840. He received a common school education, and worked at the blacksmith's trade for two years. He then worked at carpentering for about six months, when he and his father emigrated West in July, 1857, and settled in Daviess County, Ind., on a farm, and at the end of about five years the family moved to Washington. Here the father died in 1876, and the mother the following June. Our subject now lives on the farm, and owns 140 acres. In June, 1864, he was married to Mary Fanning, daughter of Thomas and Bridget (Riley) Fanning. She was born in 1841, and has borne her husband these children: Mary A., William, James, Rose and Joseph, and two infants (deceased). Mr. Roarty is a member of the Democratic party, and cast his first vote for McClellan. He has held the office of justice of the peace for two terms. He has been a member of the St. Patrick's Temperance Society since 1881.

JAMES W. PORTER, SR., was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, December 14, 1814, and is the fourth of ten children born to James Porter, a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1791. The mother's maiden name was Elizabeth Wilkey, born in Virginia in 1795. Our subject lived at home until after attaining his majority, when he married Ann S. McCoy, February 17, 1836. Her parents were Robert and Mary (Stewart) McCoy, natives of England. After our subject's marriage he lived in Jefferson County for about four years, and then immigrated to Daviess County, Ind., and settled on the farm of 160 acres, where he now lives. He was one of the first settlers of the township. To their union these ten children have been born: Robert M. (deceased), Calvin W., John C., William M. (deceased), James, Steward, Marion, Elizabeth, George W. and Joseph M. Hattie Robinson they took to raise. Mr. Porter cast his first vote for Gen. Harrison. He voted the Democratic ticket until the Rebellion, and since that time has voted the Republican ticket. He has held the office of justice of the peace. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Porter's wife died September 5, 1876. Subject has always been a farmer and stock raiser, and he at one time owned 600 acres of land, but has given the most of it to his children. His five sons, Robert, Calvin, John, William and James, were in the late, war. All returned.

JOHN C. PORTER was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, March 22, 1841. He is the third of ten children born to James and Ann (McCoy) Porter. The parents came to Daviess County, Ind., when our subject was an infant. He attended the common schools when an opportunity afforded, thus obtaining a very good education. August 16, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, Eightieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was in the battle of Perryville, and for gallant conduct was promoted to sergeant. He was wounded in the battle of Resaca, and was in the hospital three months. He was at Franklin and Nashville. After his return from the army he taught school and farmed. He now owns 225 acres of land. September 30, 1869, he was united in marriage to Margaret, daughter of John and Margaret (Chandler) Collins. They are the parents of these four children: James Austin, Stephen M., Emma and Cora J. Mr. Porter has always been a stanch Republican in politics, and cast his first presidential vote for U. S. Grant. He takes an active part in the political affairs of the county, and was appointed commissioner in 1878. He joined the Odd Fellows in 1867, and is a member in- good standing in his lodge. He is a successful and enterprising citizen of the county. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church.

STEWARD PORTER was born November 13, 1847, and is the sixth son of ten children born to James and Ann (McCoy) Porter (see sketch of J. W. Porter, for parents' sketch). He secured a common school education, and has always followed the occupation of farming. While his five brothers were serving in the war of the Rebellion, he remained at home and aided on the farm, as he was too young to enlist. He cast his first vote for Grant, and in politics has always been a stanch Republican. September 3, 1871, he -took for his companion through life Helen J. McCord, daughter of J. A. and Emily (Alford) McCord. To their union have been born four children: James Allen, William Mason, Charles Steward and Robert Wilkey. Mr. Porter commenced life for himself a poor boy, but by close attention to business and by industry, has accumulated 310 acres of good land. He was elected township trustee in 1882, on the Republican ticket, and was reelected in 1884. He became a member of the I. 0. 0. F. in 1877, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

ALEXANDER RAYHILL, is a son of John and Elizabeth (Cathcart) Rayhill. He was born in Washington County, Ind., in July, 1837, and is one of eight children. Alexander was reared in New Philadelphia, and remained with his father until his marriage, which occurred February 16, 1855, to Mary Jane Hornaday. To this union these children were born: Mary J.. Elizabeth K., Etta B.,. Martin A., Eliza T., John C., Sabine J. and Caroline. Mr. Rayhill owns 266 acres of land, 160 of which are under good cultivation. He is a stanch Republican in his political views, and has always been so. He enlisted in the cause of the Union in September, 1863, in Company B, Thirteenth Indiana Cavalry, and was first-lieutenant of his company. He participated in the siege of Mobile, Nashville, and numerous other engagements, and was honorably discharged at Vicksburg November 16, 1865. He then returned to Daviess County, where he has ever since remained. He has taken considerable interest in political affairs, but has never placed his name before the people as a candidate for any office. He cast his first presidential vote for U. S. Grant. He is an excellent farmer and citizen, and engages quite extensively in stock raising. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

THOMAS SCALES is a son of Thomas and Winnie (Hammond) Scales, and was born March 13, 1814. The father was married three times, and was the father of twenty-four children. Our subject was born in South Carolina, and removed with his parents to Washington, Ind., when only three years of age. Later they removed to Reeve Township, and there our subject was reared on a farm. He received a common school education, and in 1845 was married to Pollie Hedrich, born in Kentucky in 1820. She is a daughter of George and Hannah Hedrich. Mr. and Mrs. Scales became the parents of seven children, only five of whom are living: John B., born in 1839; George T., born in 1843; Philip, born in 1845; Elizabeth, born in 1853, and Mary Jane, born in 1866. Mr. Scales has reared his family near where he now lives. His three sons, John, Philip and George, were in the war of the Rebellion. In his political views Mr. Scales is a Republican. His name has never been before the public for patronage, but he has held numerous minor offices in his township. He and wife are church members, and are among the old pioneers of the county. He owns eighty acres of good land.

DR. WILLIAM B. WALLS was born in Orange County, Ind., August 24, 1834, and is the seventh of twelve children born to the marriage of William C. and Cynthia (Barnett) Walls, natives of Virginia and Tennessee, and born in 1798 and 1800, respectively. The Doctor lived in his native county until about ten years of age, and then moved with his parents to Crawford County, Ind., where he engaged in farming, and secured a good common school education. September 1, 1853, he led to Hymen's altar Mary Ann Newton, a native of Crawford County, born April 14, 1837, daughter of John and Cynthia (Fleming) Newton. After his marriage Dr. Walls taught school for about nine years, and then began studying medicine under the direction of Dr. Joel Vanderver, remaining with him some five years. He practiced his profession in Crawford County until August 25, 1865, when he went with his family to Haysville, Dubois Co., Ind., where he continued his practice until 1867. He then came to Alfordsville, where he has since remained. He was for some time associated with Dr. George W. Walls, and since their dissolution, in 1871, has met with good success. He is a stanch Republican, and cast his first vote for Fremont. He is a Mason, and owns forty acres of land. He is the father of these children: Sarah E., John W. A., Martha A., Mary Isabel, Leconius, L. E., George B., Frank M., Allan and Laura M. The Doctor is not a member of any church, but his family are Methodists.

BOGARD TOWNSHIP.

JAMES M. ACHOR, M. D., of Daviess County, Ind., residing at Cornettsville, is the eighth of a family of eleven children born to Abraham and Nancy (Ellis) Achor. The father was born in Virginia in 1791. He married the mother in Kentucky, where they lived about twenty-five years, and then moved to Lawrence County, Ind., and six years later moved to Daviess County, and located near Raglesville, where the father died in 1876. He was a farmer, and a soldier in the war of 1812. The mother resides with a daughter at Cornettsville. Our immediate subject was born in Owen County, Ky., December 31, 1813. He was brought to Indiana when quite young. He was raised on a farm, and remained with his parents until twenty-three years old. He taught school two terms, and had also begun the study of medicine when the war broke out. April 23, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Fourteenth Indiana Volunteers, and served until March, 1865, when he was discharged on account of a serious wound, received in 1864 at Spottsylvania Court House. He also received four gun-shot and shell fragment wounds. Coming from the army he studied medicine for three years, and during the years 1874-75 attended the medical college at Louisville, Ky. After graduating he began practicing his profession in Cornetts-vine. He has been very successful, and has a large practice. December 8, 1870, he was married to Margaret Galbreth, a native of Daviess County, born in 1848. To them were born three children, two of whom died in infancy. The one living is Alice J. Dr. Achor is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and has always been an ardent and uncompromising Republican. His wife is a member of the Methodist Church.

ELKANAH ALLEN, a prominent farmer and trustee of Bogard Township, was born near where he now lives March 11, 1853. His father, Thomas Allen, was born in Lawrence County May 23, 1829. Thomas was one of sixteen children born to Elihu and Elizabeth (Litters) Allen, who were natives of North Carolina and came to Indiana in 1818. Thomas was raised on a farm and received but very little schooling. When twenty years old he married Rebecca Henderson, who bore him eight children, all of whom are deceased except Elkanah, the subject of our sketch. His wife died in 1874, and in 1875 he married Nancy (Wilkey) McWhirter. He was a Democrat until the breaking out of the war, when he became a Republican and has remained so ever since. Elkanah lives about one mile from where his father now resides. He was raised on his father's farm and attended the common schools in boyhood and afterward attended normal school two terms and also one college term at Bedford, Ind. When twenty-one years old he married Eliza J. Sears, March 29, 1874. At the age of eighteen years he began teaching school and taught every intervening year for thirteen years. He has been quite prosperous and owns 220 acres of very fine land, well improved and with a large two-story frame residence. He and wife became the parents of four children, two of whom died in infancy. The two living are Eugenie R. and Thomas. In politics he is and always has been a Republican, and is recognized as one of the leading men of the county.

ABRAHAM CHESNUT, a prominent farmer of Bogard. Township, Daviess Co., Ind., is the youngest of a family of nine children born to Benjamin and Mahala (Howard) Chesnut, who were born, raised and married in Kentucky. After several years of married life they came to Lawrence County, Ind., where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father was a blacksmith and farmer, and was ordinarily successful. He died when our subject was but eight years of age, and the mother when he was but eighteen months old. He was born December 1, 1822, and was raised by his eldest brother until he was sixteen years old, when he began doing for himself. His educational advantages were limited, and what education he has had has been secured by desultory application since attaining his majority. He worked as a farm hand for a number of years, and when twenty-three years old purchased land in Martin County, where he farmed for about four years and then sold out and located on the farm where he now lives. He owns eighty acres of land, sixty-five acres being under cultivation. February 19, 1846, he was married to Mary Taylor, born in Kentucky, in 1825. Five children were the result of their union, all of whom are dead but one: Nancy J., born in 1847, and died in 1880; William M., born in 1849, died in 1850; Susan M., born in 1851, and is now the wife of Louis Williams; Benjamin H., born in 1854, and died in 1876; Harvey T., born in 1858, died in 1881. Mr. Chesnut and wife are members of the Methodist Church, and politically he is a very ardent Republican. He has held the office of township trustee and has been urged many times to accept other positions.

THOMAS W. FAITH is the third of seven children born to Abraham and Frances (Myers) Faith. The father was born in the " Buckeye State," and came to Daviess County, Ind., with his father, Thomas Faith, at the age of three years. The grandfather was' a native of Pennsylvania, and was in the war of 1812, under Gen. Harrison. His father was a native of the " Emerald Isle," and was of Revolutionary fame. The Faith family have ever had the welfare of their country at heart, and have participated in all its wars, with the exception of the Mexican war. The father came to Indiana in 1817, and was raised in Daviess County, near Washington. He followed the occupations of farming and carpentering until about 1879, when he retired from active life, and now lives at Plainville. The mother is a native of Daviess County, and is a daughter of William Myers. Subject was born August 27, 1844, also in Daviess County. At the age of eighteen, August 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, and after serving about three years was discharged, in 1865. He was at Richmond, Ky., and in all the battles before Vicksburg. He was with his regiment all the time, except a three months' term of sickness, and was home on furlough for a short time. While there he married Matilda J. Strange, October 31, 1863. She was born August 30, 1847, and is a daughter of John and Mary (Scott) Strange, who came from Kentucky to Indiana about 1835. The father was a farmer and a minister of the Regular Baptist Church. His mother lived to be about one hundred and three years old. The father was also very aged when he died. To Mr. and Mrs. Faith were born these children: Ulysses G., Edward C., Milton Z., John H. (deceased), Henry C., George A. and Hugh G. Mr. Faith is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. and G. A. R. fraternities. He is a very ardent Republican, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Church. They own 160 acres of land, and Mr. Faith has dealt quite extensively in lumber, and has operated and owned a saw-mill for a number of years.

JOSEPH HASTINGS. John Hastings, the father of our subject, is the eldest of nine children, and is a son of Joseph Hastings, who was one of the first settlers of Indiana, and who died in Daviess County at the age of eighty years. John was born in North Carolina, June 10, 1805, and came with his parents to Indiana, where he lived until 1856, when he moved to Kansas and yet lives there, at the age of eighty years. He has been a farmer. He was married to Rachel Rainey, who was born in Tennessee in 1801. She died in this county when on a visit from Kansas, in 1871. Our subject was born in Lawrence County, Ind., September 14, 1825. He made his home with his parents until thirty-one years of age, when he married Abigail Simes, in 1856, and located on the farm where he now lives. He owns 160 acres of well-improved land. He is a Republican, and has been assessor of Bogard Township for eight years, and has also been township trustee. He and wife are members of the Christian Church, and became the parents of seven children: John A., Malinda A. (deceased), Rachel, Emily, Andrew J., Sarah and an infant (deceased).

HENRY C. HAYNES, merchant and farmer, of Daviess 'County, Ind., was born in Lawrence County, Ind., November 27, 1844, and is the sixth of thirteen children born to John and Lavina (Sapp) Haynes. The father was born in Kentucky, and was brought to Indiana by his parents when only ten years old. About 1850 he came to Daviess County, where he spent the remainder of his days. He was a farmer, and died about 1873. The grandfather was a native of North Carolina, and came to Indiana about 1823. The mother was born in 1821, and is still living. Our subject was reared on a farm in Daviess County, and obtained but little schooling. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in Company I, Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteers, in 1862, and was discharged July 9, 1865, after a three-years' service. After his return from the army he attended several terms of school, and and then taught a number of years. At the age of twenty-one he married, and then turned his entire attention to farming, until 1881, when he engaged in the merchandising business at Epsom, continuing there four years. He has lately sold his stock, and expects to move to Plainville. He has been a successful farmer and merchant, and owns seventy-four acres of very fine land. He owns a coal lease in a vein of three feet of good coal, and operates the mine. March 2, 1866, he wedded Mary M. Myers, daughter of William T. Myers, whose sketch appears in this work. She was born near Epsom in 1848. - They are members of the Methodist Church, and politically he has always been a warm and zealous Republican. He was engaged in the practice of law for nearly five years, and is a member of the Daviess County bar.

JAMES W. KEPLINGER is the youngest of a family of three children born to Jacob and Anna (Myers) Keplinger. The father is a native of Virginia. He was married twice, his first wife bearing five children. He married our subject's mother in Ohio, and is yet a resident of that State. The mother died September 29, 1885. Of this parentage was born our subject, May 17, 1859, in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. He was reared on a farm and secured the education of the average farmer's boy. He afterward attended normal school three terms. He made his home with his parents until attaining his majority,, when he married and farmed on the home place for two years. He moved to Daviess County, Ind., September, 1882, where he has since farmed very successfully. He owns fifty-five acres of very fine land, well improved. His marriage to Mary E. Arbaugh was solemnized September 23, 1880. She was born in Ohio, January 4, 1861, and has borne her husband two children, one of whom died in infancy. The one living is Waldo H., born January 25, 1885. Mr. Keplinger and wife are members of the United Brethren Church. He is a warm Republican and a prominent young farmer of the county.

JOHN G LITTELL is the fourth of a family of nine children born to Josiah T. and Elizabeth (Gilmore) Littell. The father was born in Pennsylvania and when but five years old came to Indiana with his parents. He was raised in Clark County, Ind., where he married and followed the life of a farmer. He was born in 1795 and died in 1865. The mother was a native of Kentucky. John G. was born in Clark County, October 9, 1830„ and received the education and raising of the average farmer's boy. He resided with his parents until twenty-three years old, when he married and began his career as a tiller of the soil. He soon moved to Daviess County, Ind., and located in Madison Township. August 10, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteers, and was discharged after a three-years' service. After coming from the army he continued farming. He owns 200 acres of very fine land, well improved and mostly under cultivation. February 28, 1854, he was married to Hannah A. Burns. To them were born these five children: William 0., Thomas E., Ella A., George C. and Charles A. Mr. and Mrs. Littell are members of the Christian Church, and politically he has always been a zealous Republican.

ELIAS MYERS, farmer, and justice of the peace of Bogard Township, Daviess Co., Ind., was the second of a family of ten children born to Joseph and Mary M. (Sefrit) Myers, who were natives of North Carolina, where the father was born in 1802. He came with his parents to Indiana in 1816, and was among the very early settlers of the county. He was a farmer, and a very pious and upright man. The mother is a resident of Epsom, where she has lived ever since her marriage in 1825. Our subject was born in Bogard Township December 8, 1827, near where he now lives. He has never lived outside of the township and has never been outside of the State. His life has been spent on a farm, and his educational advantages in boyhood were very limited, but since attaining his majority he has done much to remove this deficiency. When twenty-one years old he settled on the farm where he now lives. He soon lost his eighty acres of land by a security default, but has since succeeded fairly well and has made a comfortable living. August 31, 1848, he married Dica Wesner, who died in 1866, having borne eight children, five now living: Mary E., William H., Jacob M., Joseph T. and Minerva J. January 31, 1867, he took for his second wife Sarah M. Rice. They have one child, a daughter, named Isabel. Mr. Myers is a member of the I. 0. 0. F. and F. & A. M. fraternity. He is a member of the Methodist Church and politically he is a very zealous Republican, and is now filling his third term as justice of the peace.

GEORGE W. MYERS was- born March 28, 1852, and is a son of William F. and Christiana (Sefrit) Myers, and grandson of William and Frances (Clyne) Myers. The grandparents were natives of North Carolina and came to Daviess County, Ind., in 1818, being among the very early settlers. Our subject's father was born in Daviess County July 8, 1820. When William F. was twelve years old his father died, but the mother lived until 1852. William F. received a very limited education, owing to the undeveloped condition of the schools at that time. He remained with his mother to the age of twenty-three years, when he married and located on the farm where he now lives. He has been fairly prosperous as a farmer, and owns 110 acres of very fine land well improved. April 19, 1843, he was married to Nancy McGuire, who died in 1846, leaving one child, Sarah E. February 23, 1847, he took for his second wife Christiana Sefrit. She was born in Daviess County and bore her husband nine children: Mary M., George W., William H., Elijah B., Thomas J., Margaret M., Emma J. and Ida M., and one who died in infancy. Mr. Myers is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Church. He is a very warm Republican politically, and as a farmer and citizen is very highly respected. George W. Myers was reared on the farm and after receiving only limited educational advantages in the common schools he attended normal school several terms and began teaching the young idea in 1870. He has continued at that occupation since, meeting with excellent success. He has one-half interest in the store at Epsom, carrying a line of general merchandise. He followed the life of an agriculturist for some time, but now devotes his time solely to teaching and merchandising. As a teacher he ranks among the first educators of the county. Politically he is a Republican and takes an active interest in that party.

NICHOLAS RYAN may be mentioned as one of the influential farmers of Bogard Township. He was the eldest of nine children, whose parents were Michael and Mary (Agars) Ryan, who were born in the "Emerald Isle," and came to the United States in 1836 and 1838, respectively, and located in Barr Township. They were married in September, 1839, and passed the remainder of their days upon a farm in Daviess County. They were members of the Catholic Church. Nicholas Ryan was born July 10, 1840, near where he now lives. He was reared on a farm and secured a fair business education. He remained under the parental roof until twenty-seven years of age, when he married and located on his present farm. He is the owner of 360 acres of excellent farming land, all of which is under cultivation but about 140 acres, and all cleared but about twenty acres. May 7, 1867, he was married to Mary Ann Doyle, a native of Missouri. Eleven children have been born to their union, nine of whom are living: Mary, Michael, Patrick, James, Katie, Martin, John, Maggie and Ellen. The family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Ryan is a zealous Democrat, and is one of the prominent and highly respected farmers of the county.

JAMES WADE, a prominent farmer of Daviess County, Ind., is a son of Evan and Ellen (Brewer) Wade, and was born in Washington County, Ky., June 13, 1816. He was brought to Indiana when only five years old, and lived with his parents in Lawrence County until 1837, and then came to Daviess County. He was raised on a farm and obtained his education in the old log schoolhouse of primitive days. After his marriage, January 28, 1840, he resided for some time near where he now lives, but for a number of years later lived in various parts of Indiana, but finally located on his present farm, where he has resided forty-one years. He has been very successful and owns 160 acres of very fine land. He was married to Mary Cook, a native of North Carolina, who bore him seven children, these four of whom are living: William H., Harriett, Evan and Green. His wife died in 1857, and April 13, 1858, he wedded Nancy Queen.. To them were born eight children, six now living: Alfred P., Mary A., Sarah E., James M., Thomas D. and Martha J. The family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Wade is a Democrat, and a prominent man and highly respected citizen of the county.

BENEDICT J. WADE is a descendant of one of four brothers who came from Virginia to Kentucky at an early period where they became extensive slave-holders and acquired considerable wealth.Two of the brothers went to Ohio where they freed their slaves, as did the two who remained in Kentucky. On emancipating their slaves each of the brothers gave his negroes forty acres of land. The Wades continued to amass wealth and were in all probability the ancestors of all the Wades in this section of the country. Benedict J. Wade is a descendant of one of the brothers who remained in Kentucky. He was the fourth of a family of ten children born to Evan and Ellen (Brewer) Wade. Evan was the grandson of one of the original four brothers. He was born in Kentucky in 1793, and in 1820 came to Lawrence County, Ind., where he resided until 1837, when he moved to Daviess County, where he spent the remainder of his days. He was in the war of 1812 and in the battle of New Orleans. He was a farmer in good circumstances and at the time of his death was the owner of 320 acres of well-improved land. He was a member of the Catholic Church and a Whig until 1852, when he became an uncompromising Democrat. He was one of the early pioneers and died in 1865. The mother was a native of Maryland and when twenty-two years old moved to Kentucky. She was born in 1790 and died in 1864. She had three brothers who came to Daviess County, Ind., and one yet lives in Barr Township. The Brewer family came from Belgium to this country in the same vessel with Lord Baltimore. Benedict Wade was born in Kentucky, May 19, 1820. He was reared in Lawrence County, Ind., and when seventeen years old came to Daviess County with his parents. When twenty-two years old he married and located on the farm where he now lives. For forty-nine years he has continued to farm on the same place, and has been very prosperous. He and his sons own 640 acres of very fine land. In 1842 he was married to Malinda Cook who died a. year later, leaving one child, Zibea. In 1844 he took for his second wife Marietta Gibson, a native of Kentucky, born in 1822. Twelve children have blessed their union: Thomas A., Maria J. (deceased), William S., Samuel, Sarah (deceased), Jamei M., Andrew J., Julia A. (deceased), George L., Ann E. (deceased), Ella (deceased) and Mary F. The family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Wade has been a Democrat since 1852, but previous to that time was a Whig.

THOMAS A. WADE is the eldest child of Benedict J. and Marietta (Gibson) Wade, and was born on the place where his father now resides April 7, 1845. (See father's sketch for ancestral history.) His boyhood days were spent on a farm and in attending the common schools. In 1868-69 he attended school at Bloomington, Incl., but previous to that time had taught school. He afterward followed that occupation until 1882, teaching every alternate year. He was very successful in his calling and ranked among the first educators of the county. He began farming for himself in 1870 and five years later married and settled on his present farm. He owns 100 acres of fine land, and is doing well as a farmer. He was married to Lena J. Dwyer, a native of Martin County, Ind. To their union four children were born, two of whom died in infancy. The two living are Anna M. and Agnes E. The family are Catholics and politically Mr. Wade has always been a Democrat, and has held the office of township trustee one term.

VEAL TOWNSHIP.

JOHN A. ALLISON, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Washington Township, Daviess Co., Ind., April 23, 1838, and is a son of Joseph and Mary (Ragsdale) Allison, and is of Irish-German descent. The parents were natives of Pennsylvania and South Carolina, born in 1792 and 1800, and died in Daviess County, hid., in 1873 and 1870, respectively. About 1817 the father came to Daviess County and settled in Washington. He was a soldier in the war of 1812 and was one of the pioneers of the county. Our subject received a common school educatiOn and pedagogued about seven terms. In 1877 he located on his present farm and now owns 180 acres of good land. He was married, in 1863, to Mary Carroll, a native of the county, born in 1843. daughter of Dixon Carroll, one of the early settlers of the county. They have six children: Smith M., born in 1866; Owen, born in 1869; Ivie I., born in 1871; Laura G., born in 1873; Lillie A., born in 1875, and Robert K., born in 1880. In politics Mr. Allison is a Democrat and cast his first vote for Stephen A. Douglas. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is one of the leading farmers of the township and this year (1885) sowed seventy-five acres of wheat. He has been the architect of his own fortune, and an honorable and enterprising citizen.

JOSEPH C. ALLISON, ex-trustee and farmer of Veal Township, was born about three miles from the town of Washington, Ind., April 23, 1842. He is a son of Joseph and Mary (Ragsdale) Allison (see sketch of John A. Allison for ancestral history), and was educated in the common schools of his native township and the public schools of Washington. He began teaching school in 1865, and continued that occupation during the winter seasons for about twelve years, and farmed during the summer. In 1870-71 he taught school in Newton County, Mo., and in 1873 settled on his present farm. He was married, in 1872, to Charlotte Brown, a native of the county, and daughter of Alex and Malinda Brown. She was born in 1853, and has borne her husband these four children: Frederick L., born in 1875; Ufa J., born in 1878; Edith B., born in 1880, and Nelson H., born in 1883. Mr Allison is a Democrat, and was elected trustee of Veal Township in 1874, and re-elected in 1876. He has been a fairly prosperous farmer, and owns ninety acres of well-improved land. He is a Mason, and in 1862 enlisted in Company G, Forty-second Indiana Volunteers, and served his country for three months, but was honorably discharged on ac count of physical disability. He was at the battle of Stone River.

ADIN BARBER (deceased) was a pioneer of Daviess County, Ind., born in the "Empire State" April 20, 1805, son of Lemuel and Judith (Barnes) Barber, who were born in 1763. In , early times the Barber family moved from New York to Kentucky, and were among the pioneers of that State. They came to Indiana in 1819, and located in Daviess County. Lemuel Barber was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and the family now have in their possession a miniature-keg which he carried through the war, and in which he kept liquor in case of an emergency. He died in Kentucky. Our subject located on a farm, and through life was a tiller of the soil. In 1830 he was married to Aliza flouts, born in Kentucky in 1813, daughter of George and Jane flouts, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, born in 1791 and 1788, respectively. The father died in Indiana in 1864, and the mother in 1878. To Mr. and Mrs. Barber were born children as follows; George L., born in 1831, died in 1832; Nelson, born in 1833 ; Jane, born in 1835 ; Laura, born in 1837 ; George, born in 1839 (was a soldier in Company D, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, and served until 1864; he is now a clerk in the pension department at Washington, D. C.), and Emily, born in 1841. Mr. Barber was a Whig and Republican. His death took place January 31, 1844. Mrs. Barber, an estimable lady, still resides on the old Barber homestead. The family have been prominent in the county for more than half a century.

NELSON BARBER, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Daviess County, Ind., June 12, 1833, son - of Adin and Aliza (flouts) Barber, and is of English lineage. His parents were natives of New York and Kentucky, respectively. The Barber family came to Indiana in 1819, and located in Daviess County, where the father died in 1844. Nelson Barber, our subject, was reared on the farm where he now resides. His father died when he was eleven years of age, and he remained with his mother and began working for himself after attaining his majority. During the winter of 1854-55 and the summer of 1856 he taught school in Franklin County, Ill., and the winter of 1857-58 he continued that occupation in his native county. He has since given his attention to farming, and now owns 220 acres of land, besides the old homestead. In the month of May, 1857, he was married to Mary Bachelor, born in 1838, daughter of George and Mary (Thomas) Bachelor, who were early settlers of the county, To Mr. and Mrs. Barber these children were born: Aden C., Frank, Ellis, Lewis, Edgar, George L., John N., Stanton, Cora B., Bertha, Otis and Jennie. In politics Mr. Barber is a Republican, and was elected justice of the peace in 1857, and served four years. In 1863 he was elected township trustee, and was reelected in 1864. He and wife are members of the Methodist Church, and he is one of the most public spirited citizens of the county, and a man of true merit.

WILLIAM M. COLEMAN was born in what is now Veal Township, Daviess Co., Ind., December 6, 1822, and is a son of Christopher and Margaret (Beard) Coleman. His father was a_ native of South Carolina, born in 1776, and his grandfather, John Coleman, was born in the same State. In 1811 they came, by wagon, to what is now Indiana, and located in Daviess County. Here the grandparents and parents died. The father helped to raise the first house in Washington, Ind., and was a soldier in the Black Hawk war. Subject was reared in the woods of Indiana, and when about twenty years of age began working for himself. He owned the old Coleman homestead until October, 1885, when he sold it and removed to where he now lives. In 1844 he was married to Lucinda Pry, who died in 1854, leaving one child—Nelson. That same year he took for his second wife Mrs. Sarah Braton, whose maiden name was Wallace. To their union four children were born, two of whom are living: Samuel A. and John C. Mrs. Coleman died in 1879, and late in that year he married Mary Ragsdale. To this marriage three children were born. Stella is the only one now living. Mrs. Coleman's death occurred in 1885. Mr. Coleman was a Whig, but is now a Republican in politics. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as were his wives.

JOHN F. FRANKLIN, ex-county commissioner of Daviess County, Ind., is a native of Germany, born in 1823, son of Christopher and Elizabeth Franklin. The early boyhood of our subject was spent in his native country. His father was born, lived and died in Germany, and subsequent to his demise his widow immigrated to America, bringing her son, John F., who was then about eight years old. His mother died in Baltimore, in 1834, and he was then thrown upon his own resources to obtain a livelihood. He remained for some time with an uncle, and in 1837 came to Daviess County and began working on a canal then being built. Later he worked for Hon. John Scudder and Hon. Elijah Chapman, and thus obtained a start in life. He made a number of flat-boat trips down the river, and in 1848 purchased the place where he now lives, and since that time has farmed very successfully. He owns 600 acres of land, besides holding mortgages on considerable real estate. He is a Democrat, and in 1876 was elected commissioner of Daviess County, at the time of the building of the court house, and was the leading spirit in its construction. In 1860 he was married to Laura Ragsdale, daughter of Larkin Ragsdale. They have six children: Joseph, Charity, Elizabeth, Susan, Cora and Stella. Mr. and Mrs. Franklin are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a prominent and leading citizen of the county.

EDWARD G. JACOBS, farmer and stock raiser, is a native of Jackson County, Ind., born November 17, 1829, son of Edward and Jane Jacobs, whose maiden name was Douden. Mr. Jacobs is one of a numerous family, all of whom are deceased save himself and a sister. He is of German extraction. His father was born in Virginia, and immigrated to Indiana in very early times, and settled in Jackson County, where he died about 1835. Subject, by force of circumstances, was early put at farm labor, as the father died when he was quite young, and the family were obliged to support themselves, consequently the work fell largely on our subject. He attended the district schools, and remained in Jackson County until 1859, when he removed to Washington County, where he resided until 1863, and then came to Daviess County, locating in Veal Township, where he now resides. He owns a fine farm of 478 acres. He has a good residence, built in 1881, and one of the best farms in Veal Township. In 1855 he wedded Mary Ann Hornaday, who died in 1866, leaving six children. In 1867 he took for his second wife Margaret Keelin, born in Pennsylvania, by whom he is the father of six children. In politics he is a Democrat, and is a successful and enterprising farmer.

JOSEPH JONES, merchant and farmer, was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1837, son of John and Rachael (Harrall) Jones. The father came to Daviess County at a very primitive day, and followed the occupation of farming. His death occurred in 1854, and the mother's in 1879. Our subject was reared on a farm, and attended the common schools in boyhood. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served three years. He re-enlisted in the same company, and remained in the service until the close of the war. He was in a number of the principal engagements of the war, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea. After his return from the army he devoted his time to farming, and for the last three years has been engaged in the general merchandise business. He is postmaster of Cumback postoffice, having been appointed in 1883. Mr. Jones was married, in 1864, to Burnetta Baldwin. In 1867 he took for his second wife Lucy Haley, a native of Ohio. They have two children: Oliver L. and Essie L. Subject is a prominent man of Veal Township, and is a Mason and a thorough Republican. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HAMILTON LETT (deceased) was born on what is known as the old Lett homestead, December 17, 1823, and is of English extraction, son of James and Nancy (Veal) Lett. The father was a North Carolinian, and immigrated to Indiana in pioneer times, and was one of the early settlers of Daviess County. He was reared in what was then an almost unbroken wilderness. He was a student at one of the first schools in the township, and when twenty-one years old began the battle of life on his own responsibility. In 1849 he was married to Arrilla Coleman, born in Daviess County in 1831, daughter of John B. and Frances Coleman. To Mr. and Mrs. Lett were born these children: Eli (deceased), Ellis, Eliza, Artimecy, Ida, Gibson, Emery, Laura and Dora. Mr. Lett's death occurred December 24, 1884. He was a prosperous farmer, and at the time of his death owned 250 acres of land. Mrs. Lett's paternal ancestors came to Indian:a at a very early day,when the woods of Indiana were thickly inhabited by Indians. They suffered many of the privations incident to pioneer life, but in time enjoyed the fruits of their labor.

HON. JOHN SCUDDER, a pioneer of Daviess County, Ind., was born in New Jersey April 20, 1812, and is a son of Dr. John A. and Elizabeth (Forman) Scudder, who were natives of the same State as himself and of English lineage. The father was born in 1743 and the mother in 1755. The paternal grandfather was Col. Nathaniel Scudder, a native of Long Island. He was a graduate of Princeton College, and was several times elected to the State Legislature. He was a colonel in the Revolutionary war and was killed in battle in 1781. Dr. Scudder, our subject's father, was a prominent physician and surgeon in that war. Their ancestry may be traced back to settlement in America as early as 1643. Our immediate subject is the youngest and only living one of thirteen children. In 1815 his parents removed to Mason County, Ky., and there resided until 1819, when they came to Indiana, locating in Veal Township, Daviess County, where the father practiced his profession. His death occurred in 18.36 and the mother's in 1848. Our subject was raised in what was then a wilderness, there being only one house between where his father then lived and Washington that indulged in the luxury of glass windows. At the age of twenty he began working on a fiat-boat and continued that occupation for ten years. Since that time he has carried on farming. Since 1845 he has voted the Democratic ticket, prior to that he was a Whig. In 1840 he was elected justice of the peace for Veal Township, and in 1851 was elected to represent Daviess County in the General Assembly. He has been trustee of Veal Township two terms. In 1855 he attended a reunion of the surviving members of the Constitutional Convention and of the Assembly of 1851-52. July 20, 1844, he was married to Alice Arrell, born in 1824, daughter of James and Sarah (Crabb) Arrell. They became the parents of six children, only three of whom survive: Jacob F., Sarah E. and William. The parents are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and Mr. Scudder is one of the leading men of Daviess County and one of the few living pioneers.

GEORGE W. WHITE is a native of Gibson County, Ind., where he was born in 1837. He is a son of Elias and Margaret (Pomeroy) White, and is of Dutch-Irish extraction. His father was born in Virginia in 1820, and in early life came to Indiana, and for a number of years lived in Gibson County. When our subject was about six years of age he came with his father to Daviess County and settled in Veal Township. His father died in Harrison Township. At the age of sixteen years George W. began the battle of life for himself. In 1861 he enlisted in his country's service in Company A, Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteers. He was wounded at Chancellorsville and was a prisoner of war for four months. He served three years and was honorably discharged in 1864. In 1865 he located on his present farm of about 400 acres of good land, and in 1869 he was married to Mary E. Jones, a native of Knox County, Ind., born in 1839. To their marriage two children were born, both of whom are deceased. Mr. White is a Republican, and is in every sense of the word a self-made man. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

JOSEPH WILLEY, farmer, was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, December 18, 1834, and is a son of Charles and Tilitha (Stephenson) Willey. The father was born near Boston, Mass., in 1800, and the mother born in Cape May County, N. J., in 1802. They came to Ohio in early life, where they married, and in 1839 came to Indiana. They moved to Knox County and there the father died in 1846. The mother then returned to Hamilton County, Ohio, where she now resides. In 1854 Mr. Willey returned to Daviess County, Ind., and settled in the neighborhood where he now lives. December 16, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Fifty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry for three years or during the war. He was at Fort Donelson, in the Red River campaign and at the last battle of Nashville. During service he contracted sore eyes which has almost ruined his sight. He was discharged at Eastport, Miss., in 1865. After his return he engaged in the cooper's trade, but abandoned this in 1870 and has since followed the life of a farmer. He owns fifty-five acres of land. February 21, 1856, he was married to Jane Cummings, daughter of Charles and Delilah Cummings. She was born in Pike County, Ind., June 23, 1838. To Mr. and Mrs. Willey were born these children: Talitha, John R., Joseph H., Mary, Carrie, Sarah, Bertha and Cora. Mr. Willey is a Republican in politics and was a brave and trustworthy soldier during the war. He is one of the foremost men of Veal Township, and is much respected by all.

VAN BUREN TOWNSHIP.

Receiving but a common school education. He began working at the wagon-maker's trade with George Deser, and continued at that occupation about twenty years. January 6, 1853, he led to the hymeneal altar Lucinda Dunlap, daughter of James and Crissie Dunlap. She was born March 20, 1828, in the Buckeye State, and bore her husband four children: Ira P., Amanda J.. James L. and Mary C. (deceased). Mi. Evans owns 455 acres of land, and, besides farming, deals extensively in stock. Politically he is a Republican and cast his first vote for Scott. His wife is a member of the United Brethren Church. During the years 1848-50-52 he drove about 1,300 cattle to Pennsylvania, and about 800 head of sheep, making fair profits.

DR. WILLIAM P. HOBBS, physician and surgeon, of Raglesville, Ind., was born in November, 1821, and is a son of Samuel and Ruth (Parker) Hobbs. The father was a native of North Carolina, born in 1800. He came with his parents to Indiana in 1812, and was a mason by trade. His death occurred in 1833. The mother was also born in North Carolina, in 1790, and died in 1828. When William, our subject, was about eight years old his mother died, and he lived about a year with Rev. John Strange, and spent the next year with Nathan Trueblood. He then returned to his father, who had begun keeping house, and remained with him until his death. He received a very good education, and, April 25, 1844, married Mary Elrod, daughter of Jacob and Mildred Elrod, born January 7, 1825, in Indiana. They became the parents of eight children: Mildred, Cyrus; Melville, Jacob (deceased), Wilson, Thomas (deceased) Rosetta and William. In 1850 Dr.Hobbs began the study of medicine, and after studying four years began practicing in Orange County, meeting with good success. When the war broke out he served his country as hospital steward for eight months, and then was promoted to assistant surgeon, serving for eighteen months, when he returned home on account of ill health, and resumed his practice. In 1874 he removed to Daviess County, Ind., where he has remained ever since, meeting with good success. Politically he is a Republican and cast his first vote for Taylor. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1846 he was licensed to preach and in 1868 was ordained a deacon of that church.

J. W. RANSBURY, an enterprising young farmer of Van Buren Township, Daviess Co., Ind., was born September 21, 1854, in Monroe County, Penn., and is one of five children born to the marriage of Henry Ransbury and Elizabeth Kern. The father is a native of the " Keystone" State, and was born in 1828. He is a tiller of the soil, and at the time of his marriage was a resident of his native State, where he now resides. The mother was born in the same place as her husband in 1832. Our subject attended the common schools and at the age of nineteen years began teaching school, continuing at that occupation four terms. He remained at home with his people until attaining his majority. In 1882 he and a friend by the name of George Kern came West and purchased a farm of 240 acres in Daviess County Ind., and remained partners for about two years; then Mr. Ransbury purchased his partner's share of the farm. His sister Sally, who came to Indiana in 1883, is keeping house for him. In politics he is a Republican and cast his first vote for R. B. Hayes.

ABNER G. SMILEY is a native of Ohio, where he was born November 19, 1828, and is one of four sons and three daughters born to William and Elizabeth Smiley. The father was a blacksmith by trade, and was born in Pennsylvania in 1800. In 1816 he came with his parents to Ohio, where he remained until his death in 1848. The mother was also a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1804, and is living with her eldest son and is eighty-two years of age. Owing to ill-health in his boyhood, our subject received a limited education. He remained with his parents until twenty-one years of age. May 28, 1851 he married Esther Bear, daughter of Leonard and Mary Bear. She is a native of the " Buckeye" State, born in 1833. They have seven children named Payson, Wilson, R. M., Reison, Sarah (deceased), Eliza, (deceased) and Jonas. In 1863 Mr. Smiley removed to Daviess county, Ind., where he owns 205 acres of land. His farm is well improved and furnished with good buildings. In politics he is a Democrat and cast his first vote for Franklin Pierce.

JOHN B. SPALDING was one of the well-to-do farmers of Daviess County, Ind. ; was born September 24, 1826, and has never been further than fifty miles from the place where he now lives. He is a son of Ignatius and Julia (Montgomery) Spalding, who were born in Maryland in 1777 and 1788, respectively. When quite young the father removed with his parents to Kentucky. In 1819 he came to Indiana. His death occurred in 1840 and the mother's in 1877. Our subject attended the common schools, and remained with his people until he attained his majority. At the age of nineteen he began teaching school, and followed that occupation for nearly thirty years. February 11, 1859, he married Mary A. Pate, born in Kentucky in 1831, daughter of Allen and Mary Ann Pate. To Mr. and Mrs. Spalding these children were born: George, Clementine, Simeon, Lewis, Frances, Sidney, Joseph (deceased), Melvina, Alfred, Daniel, Martin and E. L. Mr. Spalding has been treasurer of Daviess County four years. He owns 201 acres of land, and in politics is a Democrat. He and wife are members of the Catholic Church.

DR. HARVEY TAYLOR is a native of Kentucky, born April 10, 1821, son of John and Malinda (Woodall) Taylor. The father was born in Virginia in 1795. He was a farmer, and died in Kentucky in 1850. The mother was born in 1799 and died about 1854. Our subject obtained the education of the average farmer's boy, and when nineteen years old began working for -himself. April 10, 1842, he married Elizabeth Davis, born in 1817. She died in 1880, leaving one child, James S. In 1846 Dr. Taylor began the study of medicine with Dr. John Hill, of Bloomington, Ind., remaining with him one year. After a two years' study with Dr. Matthew Fee he began practicing his profession in Daviess County, Ind., meeting with good success. In 1875 he took a course of lectures at the medical college of Indiana, and graduated from that institution the same year. During the war he was a strong Union man, and served in Company C, Fourteenth Indiana Volunteers. He was promoted to first lieutenant of Company F, and remained with that company four years. He then joined Company I, Sixty-fifth Indiana Infantry, and took an active part in many of the principal battles of the war. In 1875-76 he represented Daviess County in the State Legislature. He owns 250 acres of land, and is a Democrat politically, and is a member of the F. & A. M.

THOMAS WADSWORTH, SR., was born June 30, 1828, in Lawrence County, Ind., and is one of eight children born to the marriage of Thomas and Nancy (Skaggs) Wadsworth. The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1782, and was a farmer by occupation. After living for some time in Kentucky and Tennessee he moved to Indiana, and finally located on a 100-acre farm in Van Buren County, where he remained until his death in 1841. Our subject was raised on a farm, and received a common school education. He remained at home with his parents until he reached his majority, and April 12, 1850, married Elizabeth Jane Odell, daughter of E. and S. Odell. She was born in Indiana in 1832, and bore her husband nine children: .John, Emsley, Peter, Martha, William, James, Thomas, Mary and Silas (deceased). December 26, 1868, Mrs. Wadsworth died. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a Christian in every sense of the word. January 2, 1870, Mr. Wadsworth took for his second wife Sarah J. Killion, born in 1841, in Indiana. They have two children: Bloomer and Hubert (deceased). Mr. Wadsworth owns 200 acres of land, and in 1882 erected him a fine residence. He is a Republican, and cast his first vote for Franklin Pierce. He was a strong Union man, and during the war served in Company C, Ninety-first Indiana Infantry, and was in a number of hotly-contested battles. He received his discharge in August, 1864.

PETER WADSWORTH is a son of Thomas and Nancy (Skaggs) Wadsworth, and was born in Lawrence County, Ind., July 26, 1831. He was reared on a farm, and obtained a fair education. August 6, 1854, he married Martha Crooke, who was born July 28, 1838, in Daviess County, Ind., and has borne her husband the following children: Leander, Charlotte (wife of William Mitchell), Sarah (wife of Albert Styles), Jane, Ida, John. David, Oscar, Anna B., Frances, James, Flora (deceased), and Albert. About 1848 Mr. Wadsworth purchased some land in Van Buren Township, which he afterward sold, and some time later purchased the farm of 120 acres on which he now lives. In 1867 a coal vein was discovered on his farm which, after being worked some time, proved of little value. Soon after another vein close by was opened, which has proven very valuable. During the Rebellion Mr. Wadsworth enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Forty-third Indiana Infantry, and was placed in guard of Murfreesboro, Tenn., and a number of other places. He is a Republican in politics, and in 1881 was elected constable of Van Buren Township. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

GEORGE WINKLEPLECK, JR., an enterprising farmer of Daviess County, Ind., was born in Ohio, April 2, 1846, and is one of thirteen children born to George and Susan (Bare) Winklepleck. George, the subject of this sketch, was raised on a farm and remained with his people until he was thirty-one years old, receiving a good common school education. From the time he was twenty-one till he was thirty-two years of age, he earned his living in various ways. August 20, 1878, he married Katharine Fisher, daughter of John Fisher. She was born in Ohio in 1854. To them one child was born, Walter W. June 29, 1884, he took for his second wife Laura Lynam, who bore _him one child, named Edward. In 1866 he came to Indiana, and located in Daviess County on a farm of 168 acres. In 1881 he purchased seventy acres of land, and in 1885 seventy-seven acres more. Politically he is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Seymour. Mrs. Winklepleck was born December 9, 1852, and owns- 124 acres of land in Bogard Township.

ELMORE TOWNSHIP.

W. T. DILLON was born in Daviess County, Ind., May 27, 1847, and is one of seven children born to William and Eliza (Sglerfield) Dillon. The father was of Irish descent, born in Ohio in 1798. He was twice married, and was the father of fourteen children. He moved to Daviess County, Ind., in 1821. He owned 145 acres of land, and was among the pioneer settlers of the county. He died in 1876. The mother was of French descent, born in Kentucky in 1812, and came to Indiana with her parents when a child. She now lives with her children. Subject was educated in the district schools, and made his home with his parents until twenty-one years old. July 26, 1871, he married Angeline Arford, born in Indiana March 5, 1851, daughter of Jacob and Catherine Arford. To Mr. and Mrs. Dillon these seven children were born: Ada, William, Walter, Albert, Franklin, Arthur and Inez. After marriage Mr Dillon located on a 120-acre tract of land given him by his father. He now owns 205 acres of land. In politics he is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Seymour. He was appointed assessor of Elmore Township in 1874, and in 1876 was elected Township Trustee, and was re-elected in 1878. He was a faithful and efficient official, and gave good satisfaction to all. He and wife are members of the United Brethren Church.

SAMUEL JOHNSON was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, .June 29, 1824, and is the youngest of ten children born to Robert and Dolly (Patterson) Johnson, who were born in the State of New York in 1784 and 1788, respectively. The father was a ship-carpenter during the early part of his life, but later followed agricultural pursuits. He was married in 1808 and was a soldier during the war of 1812. In 1817 he left the "Empire State " and moved to Ohio, where he purchased 100 acres of land. His death occurred in the prime of life, August 2, 1828. The mother resided on the old home place for a number of years after her husband's death, and later made her home with her eldest daughter Aletta, at Cincinnati. She died November 13, 1875. Subject resided with his mother on the farm, and acquired his education in the district schools. When seventeen years of age he commenced, as an apprentice, learning the cooper's trade, and continued that occupation for upward of fifteen years, and in connection carried on farming on a small scale. April 15, 1850, he married Eleanor Watson, daughter of Daniel and Ann (Tumbleson) Watson. Mrs. Johnson was born in Ohio August 10, 1832. To their union thirteen children were born, eight of whom are living: Alexander, Charles, Amy, Dolly (wife of Jesse Goshorn), Edward D., Elsworth L., Elmer B., Stanley B. and Eleanor G. Mr. Johnson continued working at his trade for about five years after marriage. He then gave his entire attention to farming. In 1869 he sold his farm of sixty acres and came to Daviess County, Ind., and purchased 440 acres of land in Elmore Township where he located and has since lived. He has been very successful and carries out the modern ideas of agriculture. In politics he is a Republican and cast his first vote for Gen. Taylor. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Church.

SOLOMON KETCHUM, SR., was born in Knox County, Tenn., February 29, 1812, and is one of fourteen children born to Joseph and Mary (Courtney) Ketchum. The father was of English-Irish descent, born in North Carolina in 1756. He went to Virginia in his youth. Here he married, and later moved to Tennessee, where he purchased property and followed the occupation of farming. In 1833 he came to Daviess County, Ind., and purchased 320 acres of land, on which he located and lived until his death, in August, 1840. The mother was a native of Virginia, and died in Daviess County in February, 1854. Subject was educated in'the old log schoolhouse of pioneer days, and in obtaining his education suffered all the inconveniences incident to those times. He resided with his parents until twenty-two years of age. March 3, 1837, he married Mary, daughter of William and Nancy Moore. Mrs. Ketchum was born September 22, 1820, and bore her husband twelve children, seven of whom are living: Joseph A. Mary Ann, wife of Isaac Boyd; John R. ; Nancy, widow of John Ferguson; Jesse F., Thomas J. and Solomon S., all of whom are living at or near home. Mr. Ketchum started in life with but forty-eight acres of land, but by untiring energy and close attention to business now owns 454 acres of well-improved land. He experienced many hardships in acquiring his property, and in early days was compelled to take his grain to Maysville to be ground—a distance of twenty-four miles—the trip taking three or four days. He hauled wheat to Vincennes, receiving 37/ cents a bushel for it. In 1834 he cast his first vote in the township, there being then but forty voters in the entire township. In politics Mr. Ketchum is a Democrat, and cast his first vote for Gen. Jackson, and his last for Grover Cleveland. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church_ His wife is the oldest native resident of the township. She spun and made their clothes for many years, and is yet skillful with the spinning-wheel.

RICHARD McHASTINGS was born in Martin County, Ind., November 15, 1845, and is one of six sons and two daughters born to the marriage of James McHastings and Eliza Webster. The father is a native of Indiana, born in 1812, a farmer by occupation. He owned 310 acres of land in Daviess County, Ind., and died in the fall of 1876. The mother was born in 1818 in Washington County, Ind., and died in 1874. Subject attended the district schools in boyhood and went two miles to receive instruction. He resided with his parents until twenty-four years of age. In November, 1870, he married Laura Vales, daughter of Lewis and Rhoda Vales. She was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1849 and died. in March, 1874, after having borne her husband three children, all of whom are deceased. In May, 1879, Mr. McHastings married Eveline (Dukes) Bryant, daughter of David and Mary Dukes. They have one child, named Susan. In the winter of 1871, subject purchased 120 acres of land on which he has since lived. He is an enterprising and energetic farmer, and has been quite successful in his business ventures. He is a Republican and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant.

MARTIN NUGENT was born in Parke County, Ind., February 11, 1831, and is a son of Charles and Mary Nugent, who were born in Shelby County, Ky., in 1800. The father was a farmer. He married in his native State, and came to Parke County, Ind., and located on an eighty-acre tract given him by his father-in-law. In 1845 he took a trip to the Southern States, and the next year died in Arkansas. After the death of her husband the mother made her home with her son Thomas. She died in 1875. Subject attended the subscription and free schools about three months during the year. He lived with his mother until fourteen years old, and when fifteen years old, hired out as a farm hand for $4 per mouth. The next year he bound himself out to a widow lady until he attained his majority. At the expiration of that time he remained six years longer as a renter. When twenty years old he began teaching school, which occupation he followed three winter terms, meeting with good success. March 2, 1859, he married Eliza C. Johnson, who was born- in Knox County, Ind., September 6, 1833. To their union five children were born, these three living: Eugenia, Mary Elizabeth and Thomas. In 1859 Mr. Nugent located on his 240-acre farm. He now owns 400 acres of land, about 260 of which being under cultivation. As a farmer he is enterprising and successful, and as a citizen is highly esteemed by all who know him. In politics he is a stanch Republican, and cast his first -vote for Fillmore. September 8, 1874, his wife died, and since that time his daughter Eugenia has kept house for him.

AMOS R. STALCUP, merchant, was born in Greene County, Ind., February 14, 1847, son of Stephen and Sarah Ann (Smock) Stalcup. The father was born in Tennessee in 1794, and was a stock speculator. His first wife, whom he married in Tennessee, died in Greene County, Ind. He then married our subject's mother, who was a native Kentuckian, born in 1812. The father died in 1867, and the mother in 1879. Subject received a common school education. When twenty years of age he began doing for himself. In July, 1866, he married Elizabeth Fate, born in 1851, daughter of William and Mahala Fate. To their union six children were born, three of whom are living: Ellen. William Henry, and Julia. After his marriage Mr. Stalcup worked at the blacksmith's trade in Marco, Ind., for two years, and then moved to Daviess County, Ind. In July, 1878, his wife died, and November, 1879, he wedded Nancy J. Crooke, born February 16, 1861, in Illinois, daughter of Jesse and Priscilla Crooke. They have one child, named Frank. In 1878 Mr. Stalcup abandoned his trade, and began selling mercantile goods on commission. Three years later he began selling goods on his own responsibility, and has continued. at that work ever since. In addition to the duties of his store, he looks after his shop and speculates in grain. He has a fine stock of general merchandise, and is the leading business man of the village. In politics he is a Republican, and cast his first vote for U. S. Grant. He held the office of postmaster for twelve years.

GEORGE WILLSON is a son of Le Roy and Rosanna (Clawson) Willson, born in Daviess County, Ind., February 14, 1835. The father was of English descent, born in Tennessee about 1803. He was a farmer, and at the time of his marriage lived in his native State. He afterward moved to Daviess County, Ind., and after a twelve years' residence in Madison Township he sold out. He then resided in Knox County, Ind., until 1858, when he moved to Missouri, and after the breaking out of the war lived in Stone County, where he died in 1863. The mother was of Irish descent. She was born in Tennessee and died in Missouri. Our subject made his home with his father until he was over twenty years of age. August 25, 1856, he took for his life companion Frankie Ann Hanna, daughter of Andrew and Sallie Hanna. Mrs. Willson was born in Daviess County, Ind., in 1837. They became the parents of these two children: Adrian and James. Mrs. Willson died in March, 1862, and September, 1865, he married Susan Scamp, daughter of John and Mary Scamp. To them were born five children, four living: Eliza, Ruth, Mary and Riley. This wife died in 1880, and in February, 1885, he wedded Mrs. Hester Crosby. Mr. Willson has been an industrious man, and owns 220 acres of land. In politics he is a Republican, but cast his first vote for James Buchanan.

STEELE TOWNSHIP.

JOHN CLARK, a very prominent farmer and county commissioner, of Daviess County, Ind., is a son of William and Elizabeth (Cunningham) Clark. The father was a native of England, and came to America when a young man, and located in Dearborn County, Ind. The mother was born in South Carolina, and when quite young came to Indiana with her parents, who were among the early settlers, and were obliged to protect themselves from the Indians by taking refuge in a block-house. Mr. and Mrs. Clark were married in Dearborn County, and when John, our subject, was but seven years old his father died. The mother died in 1875. Of their five children, our subject and one brother are the only surviving members. John's birth occurred July 22, 1824, in Indiana. He obtained his education in the old time log schoolhouse of other days, He remained with his mother until twenty-four years old, but worked for himself at the cooper's and carpenter's trades for several years. In 1848 he married Caroline Coman, and settled on a part of the old home stead and began farming. In 1854 he moved to Decatur County, and five years later came back to Dearborn County and engaged in the general merchandise business. From 1867 to 1871 he operated a saw-mill in Ripley County, and at the latter date moved to the farm of 160 acres, where he now lives. His farm is well improved, furnished with good barns, granaries, and an excellent frame residence. Mrs. Clark bore her husband ten children, four of whom died in infancy. Those living are Mary J., Clara A., Ada E., Ida 0., John L. and Howard H. In 1870 Mrs. Clark died, and three years later Mr. Clark married Elizabeth E. Ferguson, a native of Ohio. They are members of the Methodist Church, and he is a Mason, and a Democrat politically. He has held different offices in township and county, and has been county commissioner for five years. As a farmer he has been successful, and as a citizen is known as a thoroughly upright and honorable member of society.

JAMES HEINBAUGH is the third of eight children born to Samuel and Elizabeth (Shull) Heinbaugh. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, and moved to Indiana in 1849. He was a farmer, and died in 1863. The mother was also a native of Pennsylvania, and is now living in Missouri. James Heinbaugh was born in the "Keystone State" March 4, 1838. He came to Indiana when about eleven years old, where he received limited educational advantages. When twenty-two years old he began working as a farm hand, and at the end of four years farmed on rented land, and after coming to Daviess County rented land for two years, and then purchased part of his present farm. He now owns 108 acres of good land situated near the station of Plainville. In 1863 he wedded Tamzen Price. They became the parents of six children, four of whom are living: Charles W., Cora B., Lillie M. and Anna L. Mr Heinbaugh is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., and in politics is a Democrat. He has been justice of the peace four years, and is now holding the office of trustee. He was a soldier in the late war, enlisting in Company G, Eighty-fourth Indiana Volunteers in 1861, and served eighteen months.


DR. EDWARD D. MILLIS, physician, of Plainville, Ind., was the eldest of a family of six children born to John and Nancy (Cloud) Millis. The father was a native of Orange County, Lad., born in 1816, and was a farmer in good circumstances. He moved to Kansas in 1868, where he now lives. The mother was born in North Carolina, and when about six years old came to Indiana, where she was raised. She was born in 1815 and died in Kansas in 1875. Of this parentage was born the subject of this sketch in Orange County, Ind., May 22, 1845. He passed his boyhood days on a farm, and when eighteen years old enlisted in the army in Company K, Fifty-third Indiana Infantry and served until the close of the war. By exposure and hardships incident to army life he contracted chronic rheumatism, which has led to disease of the heart and gives him great trouble. After returning home from the war he attended school at different academies for about three years and afterward taught two schools. He began attending school at the State University but took only a part of one year's course, when his health failed him. He then studied medicine for several years, and took a course of lectures in the Kentucky School of Medicine at Louisville. He practiced his profession in Lawrence County, Ind., until 1880, when he came to Plainville, Daviess County, and still continues his practice. He owns ninety-five acres of good land, which his son cultivates. After his return from the army he married Eliza A. Burton, who was born April 25, 1846. They were married in 1867 and became the parents of five children, one of whom died in infancy. Those living are Tillie, Burton J., Carrie N. and William E. Dr. Millis is a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a successful physician and one who is ever ready to support worthy enterprises. His eldest daughter graduated in the common school course at the age of fifteen years, and taught her first school very successfully when sixteen years old.
 

JOHN C. WRIGHT is the youngest of a family of five children born to the marriage of Wiley Wright and Anne Coleman, natives of North and South Carolina, respectively, the father born in 1799 and the mother in 1802. They both came to Indiana with their parents when quite young. They were raised near Washington, where they lived and died. The father died April 17, 1855, and the mother April 21, 1855. Our subject was born near Washington, in Daviess County, February 11., 1841. He was reared on a farm' and attended the common schools. His parents died when he was fourteen years old., and he then lived With different persons until eighteen years old, when he enlist6d in Company D, Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry, in 1861. He was discharged August 18, 1864, after three years' service. He
was uninjured except by army exposure. After his return from the war he began farming near where he now lives. He has prospered fairly well and owns eighty acres of very fine land. January 31, 1865, he was married. to Emma Lee. They became the parents of three children, one of whom is dead. Those living are Amy I. and James E. Politically Mr. Wright is a zealous Republican, and is now assessor of Steele Township, and is much respected as a neighbor and citizen.


Index

Preface | Ch1 | Ch2 | Ch3 | Ch4 | Ch5 | Ch6 | Ch7 | Ch8 | Ch9 |Biographies

 

 
 
 

This information is the research of many people across the United States and may contain errors. It is presented as the best information to date. Like all of those whose work I have incorporated herein, my research is a work in progress and subject to change without notice. A special thanks to Marlene Ricci of CA, Dwayne Meyer of CA, Jacqueline Bean of TX, Debbie Dick of IN, Milus Miller of IL, Carol Hendricks Miller of IN, Clarence Miller of IN, and Harold Glen Miller of IN. There are numerous others too; many of which are unknown, but their findings and stories are still much appreciated. Much of this would not have been possible with out their information. Also this website includes historical facts gathered from Washington County History, Indiana History, Rowan County and Salisbury North Carolina Historical sources and other US Historical sources.

James A. Miller- Great -Great -Great -Great Grandson of Adam Miller and Hannah Sheets.

©2007 The Millers of Washington County

Visit our Book Store for More Indiana Reading!! 

 

 

  Last Updated 12/17/10 03:40:51 PM -0800